Army Medical School Scholarship

Last Updated on September 8, 2022 by Ngefechukwu Maduka

Do you want to join the Army and become a doctor? If yes, then this scholarship is for you. The scholarship covers tuition, room and board, books, fees, and provides living stipend ($3,000/month). You will have to attend Basic Training (6 weeks), Advanced Individual Training (11 weeks), and an internship year in a medical field of your choice. Applicants must have graduated from high school with a 3.2 GPA or higher. Good luck!

Everyone knows that joining the military is not a way to get rich, but the Army Medical Scholarship Program makes it possible to earn a free medical education in exchange for serving your country. And you’ll get paid in the process – as a commissioned officer of the Army.

Are you an international student? and been puzzled by the contradictory information you encountered on the internet. You need not look further, this article allows you to learn more about army medical school scholarships.

It is possible for you to find more information about army medical school scholarship requirements on Collegelearners. Read on to discover the latest information on army reserve medical school scholarship.

About US Army Medical School Scholarships

The Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP) offers full support (tuition, fees, and a monthly stipend) to medical students while in medical school in exchange for military service once the scholarship recipient has completed the M.D. degree.

How to Get Army Scholarships for Medical School | HowStuffWorks

Air Force HPSP
Jorge A. Nevarez, Technical Sergeant
Health Professions Recruiter
3906 Raynor Parkway, Suite 102
Bellevue, NE 68123
Phone: 402-200-8669
Email: [email protected]

Army HPSP
Jennifer L. Anderson, Sergeant First Class
Army Health Care Recruiter
7900 International Drive, Suite 1068
Bloomington, MN 55425
Cell: 952-239-8454
Phone: 952-288-5308
Fax: 952-854-6014
Email: [email protected]

Navy HPSP
Julian Aryee, Chief Hospital Corpsman
Navy Medical Programs Recruiter
808 Washington Avenue SE
Minneapolis, MN 55414
Cell: 612-403-3762
Email: [email protected]

Indian Health Service (IHS) Scholarships for Native Americans
The Indian Health Service (IHS) provides financial support to qualified American Indian and Alaska Native health professions students. In exchange for financial support, scholarship recipients agree to a minimum two-year service commitment within an Indian health program in the student’s chosen health professional discipline.

Minnesota Indian Scholarship Program
American Indian students with at least one-quarter Indian ancestry and who are graduate students enrolled at least half-time may be eligible for these scholarships through their tribal agency office and/or the Minnesota Indian Scholarship Program (Minnesota residency required).

National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program
This scholarship program from the National Health Service Corps (NHSC) offers full support (tuition, fees, and a monthly stipend) to medical students while in medical school in exchange for providing full-time service in a health professional shortage area upon completion of training as assigned by the NHSC.

Medical Student Debt

More than 70% of medical school graduates carry debt.1
The median educational debt for indebted medical students graduating in 2019 was $200,000.1
For public medical schools, the median total cost for state residents for four (4) years is $156,600 ($39,150 a year).2
For private medical schools, the median cost for four (4) years is $256,212 ($64,053 a year).2
The 10 most expensive U.S. medical schools exceed $67,000/year in tuition and fees.3
The Air Force HPSP offers medical students the opportunity to receive a full tuition scholarship along with a generous monthly stipend in exchange for future service as an Air Force physician.
Benefits of the HPSP Program

Students receive full tuition and required fees at the accredited U.S. medical school of their choice located within the continental U.S., Hawaii, Alaska or Puerto Rico.
Books and most other educational fees are also covered under the HPSP scholarship.
An annual salary of ~$32,000 which includes
Monthly stipend of $2,466.00/month for 10 ½ months
Second Lieutenant military and travel pay for the remaining 45 days, during their active duty tour.
There is a $20,000 signing bonus for students who receive a four (4) year AF HPSP scholarship, similar to the Army and Navy program. Likewise, three (3) year scholarship participants can receive the signing bonus if they agree to a four (4) year commitment.
Who Can Apply?

Applicants must be accepted to or enrolled in a medical school accredited by either the Association of American Medical Colleges (MD schools) or American Osteopathic Association (DO schools) located within the continental U.S., Hawaii, Alaska or Puerto Rico.
Applicants must be U.S. citizens.
Applicants must be physically qualified for commissioning as an Air Force officer.
When to Apply?

For four (4) year scholarships, the best time to apply is early fall of the year prior to attending medical school.
Students already in medical school applying for three (3) year scholarships should apply immediately.
Scholarships are awarded on a rolling basis; early application maximizes opportunity for selection.
Selection Criteria

Air Force, Army, ROK military complete joint scenario

Applicants must have a minimum 3.2 undergraduate GPA and 500 MCAT with a minimum score of 124 on each of the MCAT subsections.
Applicants for three (3) and four (4) year scholarships with at least a 3.6 undergraduate GPA and an MCAT total score of 505 (& minimum subsection score of 124 in each subsection) are automatically selected and do not meet a scheduled accession board.
Participation in the Program

The student’s #1 priority while enrolled in the HPSP program is to dedicate themselves to their studies. Students are not expected to wear their uniforms to class.
Students who are enrolled in the HPSP program also participate in specialized military training programs designed to help orient participants to Air Force medicine; these are known as ADTs.
Students are placed on ADT orders for 45 days for each year of participation. During that 45 day period, the students may attend training programs that last from 2-5 weeks in length (e.g. Commissioned Officer Training five (5) weeks, Aerospace Medicine Primary Course two (2) weeks, and clinical rotations four (4) weeks).
The first ADT will be to attend COT at Maxwell Air Force Base in Montgomery, Alabama, where HPSP participants receive practical instruction and training on their role as an Air Force Medical Officer.
HPSP students attend Aerospace Medicine Primary Course to gain understanding of medicine in the Air Force and their connection to the Air Force Mission.
During the remaining ADTs, medical students will do clinical rotations at one of our nine (9) Air Force teaching facilities around the country.
Students are expected to meet Air Force Fitness Standards while on active duty. Students must pass the fitness test at the start of COT.
Service Obligation for HPSP

Serve a minimum three (3) year commitment as an active duty officer or one (1) year for each year of scholarship participation (whichever is greater).4, 5
Three (3) year HPSP recipients have a three (3) year service obligation (four (4) year obligation if accepting signing bonus).
Four (4) year HPSP recipients have a four (4) year service obligation.
Payback of educational commitment begins after completion of graduate medical education training.
Time spent in a military residency or fellowship program does not count towards service obligation.
In comparison, students attending the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences incur a seven (7) year service obligation.

Army Medical School Scholarship UK

The Air Force has numerous residency and fellowship training program opportunities in 84 different specialties at nine (9) different Air Force training locations in addition to some Army, Navy and civilian locations.
HPSP participants are required to apply to the Joint Service Graduate Medical Education Selection Board at the beginning of their final year of medical school.
The JSGMESB is the process by which Air Force obligated officers compete for selection in GME residencies and fellowship programs and is similar to the civilian match.
Most individuals will be selected for residency and fellowship training in Air Force programs.
However, some students may be selected by the JSGMESB to train in civilian residency programs.
Detailed information on the GME application process is provided to all program participants by our HPSP Program Managers.
Students can find additional information on the Air Force Physician Education Branch website: http://www.airforcemedicine.af.mil/Organizations/Physician-Education-Branch/
Why Should Medical Students Consider Air Force Medicine?

In addition to the financial benefits of the HPSP scholarship program, there are many other advantages to Air Force medicine:

Great patient populations! Our patients include active duty members, their families, as well as retired military members and their families.
The ability to provide total care. One of the fundamental advantages of the military health system is the ability to render care to a patient without worrying about whether or not they can afford to fill their prescriptions or obtain a vital lab test.
Quality colleagues. No doubt about it, physicians who choose to serve in the military are a special group of highly trained, dedicated professionals.
Travel opportunities. Air Force physicians can be stationed at military clinics and hospitals all over the world and deploy in support of military operations. In addition, they also participate in a variety of humanitarian missions and specialized medical training all over the globe.
Potential for zero debt and better pay! Not only does a HPSP scholarship cover all tuition, books, fees, it also provides a generous monthly stipend. Once doctors graduate from medical school, they will find that the salaries and benefits of being a military resident or fellow in a military training program far exceed civilian averages.
Opportunity to be a leader and make a difference. Not only for individuals in your own community, but quite possibly for individuals and communities around the world.
How Can Students Apply to HPSP or Get More Information about AF Physician Career Opportunities?

Learn more/chat online: https://www.airforce.com/careers/specialty-careers/healthcare/overview
Via the online chat, students will be given the phone numbers for their local HP recruiter.
Call 1-800-588-5260.
Compare the services: https://www.medicineandthemilitary.com/
Contact a local Health Professions recruiter who will walk them thru the application process.
Sources

AAMC Physician Education Debt and the Cost to Attend Medical School
AAMC Tuition and Student Fees Reports
U.S. News & World Report: 10 Most Expensive Private Medical Schools
DoDI 6000.13
AFMAN 36-2100

As I mentioned in my last post, there are a few exceptions that students can consider to reduce or eliminate borrowing altogether, including programs like the National Health Service Corp (NHSC) or the Armed Forces Health Profession Scholarship Program (HPSP). But even these opportunities are limited.

For example, the NHSC is a federal scholarship program that annually gives 80-90 scholarships nationally that pay for medical school (tuition, books and a living stipend) in exchange for the student’s later obligation and commitment to practice in areas of need (i.e., family medicine, general internal medicine, general pediatrics, Med/Peds, OB/GYN and Psychiatry). The HPSP is a congressional program that authorizes the military branches (Army, Navy and Air Force) to pay the costs of medical school (tuition, books and a living stipend) for approximately 200 students nationally per military branch in exchange for the student to practice as a military doctor.

Military recruiters regularly visit our medical school offices to offer information about the HPSP scholarships and ask for opportunities to make medical students aware of the scholarships. The HPSP is currently a very lucrative opportunity for a medical student. In the last few years, each of the military branches has been able to offer interested medical students a $20,000 sign on bonus. This is in addition to the military scholarship covering tuition, fees, health insurance in addition to reimbursing all costs related to required books and supplies. A living stipend of $2,108 (based on 2011-2012 academic year stipends) is also issued monthly while in medical school. Most HPSP candidates will graduate and go directly into a military residency program where they often receive salaries that are approximately $20,000 above the civilian residency programs. Later, when they go into their practice years with the military, they make less money, but what they earn is generally devoid of any commitments to paying off medical school debt and also receives a generous housing allowance.

Clearly, there are a lot of benefits to doing the HPSP, but there are also drawbacks. Drawbacks that I have heard on more than one occasion are the loss of independence until you have completed your stint with the military, the small chance that you may not secure a residency in the area of your interest or it may be delayed by a year of more. You can imagine that you are making a commitment of at least 11-13 years to the military when you consider medical school (4 years), residency training (3-5 years) and the practice years (4 years). Being a military spouse can be difficult at times.

Here is information for the HPSP with the Army, Navy, and Air Force.

In my next post, I’ll discuss the National Health Service Corps.

Students often assume that loans are the only financing option for medical school. While loans are indeed the primary funding source, scholarships are available from a number of sources to reduce or, in some cases, obviate educational debt altogether. This section describes a variety of scholarships that are available to medical students.

Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP)
The Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program offers scholarships through the U.S. Army, Navy and Air Force. These one-, two-, three- and four-year scholarships cover all direct educational costs (i.e., tuition, fees, books, health insurance) and provide a monthly stipend for ten and one-half months per year. In return, there is a service commitment of one year of active duty service for each year of participation in the program, with a minimum commitment of three years. For more information, please visit the following websites or contact Kimberly Millette in the Student Activities Office:
Army HPSP
Navy HPSP
Air Force HPSP

National Health Service Corps (NHSC)
The National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program, funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, pays tuition, required fees, and some other education costs, tax free, for as many as four years. The program includes a monthly stipend in exchange for service in a federally-designated and medically underserved area of the United States. In addition, priority for selection is given to applicants who are committed to primary care specialties such as family practice, general internal medicine, pediatrics and obstetrics-gynecology.

The Office of Financial Aid office maintains a list of current and former NHSC recipients who would be happy to share their experiences in the program. If you wish to receive this list, please contact us at [email protected] Additional information regarding the NHSC Scholarship Program may be obtained on their website.

Indian Health Service Program (IHS)
The Indian Health Service (IHS) Program offers scholarships similar to the NHSC Program. IHS scholarships include tuition, supplies, a book allowance, and a monthly stipend. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who are federally recognized American Indians or Alaskan Natives. Students interested in obtaining more information should check out their website. The AAMC also has information on this loan repayment and scholarship program.

Yellow Ribbon Veteran’s Administration (VA) Program
AMS offers two eligible medical students $15,000 in scholarship funding. The VA will match the $15,000 scholarship for eligible veterans or dependents’ of eligible veterans’ medical students. Medical students are required to submit documentation to the Alpert Medical School Office of Financial Aid. Students need not be recipients of need-based aid to receive this benefit. Veterans should contact the VA directly to determine their eligibility for the program. Additional information regarding VA Benefits and the Yellow Ribbon Program is available at GI Bill Information or by calling VA Benefits at 1-800-827-1000. For assistance in obtaining a certification of enrollment at Brown, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (401) 863- 2500.

Students often assume that loans are the only financing option for medical school. While loans are indeed the primary funding source, scholarships are available from a number of sources to reduce or, in some cases, obviate educational debt altogether. This section describes a variety of scholarships that are available to medical students.

Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP)
The Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program offers scholarships through the U.S. Army, Navy and Air Force. These one-, two-, three- and four-year scholarships cover all direct educational costs (i.e., tuition, fees, books, health insurance) and provide a monthly stipend for ten and one-half months per year. In return, there is a service commitment of one year of active duty service for each year of participation in the program, with a minimum commitment of three years. For more information, please visit the following websites or contact Kimberly Millette in the Student Activities Office:
Army HPSP
Navy HPSP
Air Force HPSP

National Health Service Corps (NHSC)
The National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program, funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, pays tuition, required fees, and some other education costs, tax free, for as many as four years. The program includes a monthly stipend in exchange for service in a federally-designated and medically underserved area of the United States. In addition, priority for selection is given to applicants who are committed to primary care specialties such as family practice, general internal medicine, pediatrics and obstetrics-gynecology.

The Office of Financial Aid office maintains a list of current and former NHSC recipients who would be happy to share their experiences in the program. If you wish to receive this list, please contact us at [email protected] Additional information regarding the NHSC Scholarship Program may be obtained on their website.

Indian Health Service Program (IHS)
The Indian Health Service (IHS) Program offers scholarships similar to the NHSC Program. IHS scholarships include tuition, supplies, a book allowance, and a monthly stipend. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who are federally recognized American Indians or Alaskan Natives. Students interested in obtaining more information should check out their website. The AAMC also has information on this loan repayment and scholarship program.

Yellow Ribbon Veteran’s Administration (VA) Program
AMS offers two eligible medical students $15,000 in scholarship funding. The VA will match the $15,000 scholarship for eligible veterans or dependents’ of eligible veterans’ medical students. Medical students are required to submit documentation to the Alpert Medical School Office of Financial Aid. Students need not be recipients of need-based aid to receive this benefit. Veterans should contact the VA directly to determine their eligibility for the program. Additional information regarding VA Benefits and the Yellow Ribbon Program is available at GI Bill Information or by calling VA Benefits at 1-800-827-1000. For assistance in obtaining a certification of enrollment at Brown, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (401) 863- 2500.

Army National Guard Medical School Scholarship

As you start think about medical schools, it’s wise to begin making plans about how to pay for your education. You know about loans, of course, but there are medical school scholarships that range from hundreds of dollars to the full cost of your education. With so many options available, it’s a good idea to start researching while you’re still in college.

“The longer you spend reading about it and thinking about it, the less intimidating it’s going to be,” says Kevin Ladd, COO of Scholarships.com

Researching scholarships early shouldn’t come at the expense of working on applications, but you should know that many institutions use your application to determine your eligibility for certain awards. Being aware of the possibilities can help you shape your application in a way that highlights important areas.

6 MEDICAL SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIP OPTIONS
Whether you’re looking into a full-ride scholarship to medical school or smaller ones to help with the cost, chances are there is one (or two) that fit your needs.

  1. MERIT-BASED SCHOLARSHIPS
    Some medical schools will extend scholarship offers to outstanding students. A significant number of these are based on  undergraduate GPA and MCAT scores. There are also ones that reward applicants with desirable characteristics or those who’ve demonstrated a vision for the work they plan to do in the future.

St. George’s University (SGU), for example, has a robust scholarship program for students in need and those who have demonstrated academic excellence. Here is a taste of the types of awards:

The Humanitarian Scholarship is offered to incoming students who have demonstrated compassion and commitment to humanitarian causes in their local communities.

The Chancellor’s Circle Legacy of Excellence Scholarship is a $94,500 award automatically given to students who have been accepted by the Committee on Admission. with a minimum overall undergraduate GPA of 3.7, a 3.5 science GPA, and 506 MCAT score.

The Veteran Grant is a token of gratitude for Veterans of the US Armed Forces entering the four-year MD program, totaling up to $50,000.

The Legacy Grant is worth up to $20,000 and is available to any child or grandchild of an SGU School of Medicine alumni.

The Health Professions Grant is an award of up to $20,000 for students who are currently or have been employed in the health care field in the past two years.

  1. MILITARY SERVICE SCHOLARSHIPS
    You may be familiar with scholarships available to military students. The Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP)—awarded by the US Army, Navy, and Air Force—full military medical school scholarship. It’s important to be aware this is only available to students enrolled at a program in the US or Puerto Rico. Dr. James Dahle, emergency physician and founder of the White Coat Investor, also points out such scholarships are really contracts that require military service. This is clearly a significant commitment.

Another option that’s available to students at international schools is Veterans Affairs (VA) education benefits, provided the institution is approved by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Your eligibility for these benefits depends on length of military service and a number of other factors. You can get an idea of what you may be able to receive by reviewing the available rate tables.

  1. ORGANIZATION AND PERSONAL PROVIDER SCHOLARSHIPS
    Financial assistance from organizations and personal providers is going to require the most research, but there are scholarships from local organizations, national organizations, and individuals or families who champion a specific field of study. Ladd recommends using online scholarship searches and networking with people who have recently entered the field to see what options exist. “They might have a better idea of the pulse of the current state of education and financial aid,” Ladd explains.

Be sure to talk to the medical school admissions department at the schools you’re considering to find out about additional options. And don’t forego applying for opportunities just because you assume your chances are too slim.

Dr. Dahle started  The White Coat Investor Scholarship in 2015 to give back to the website’s community, promote financial literacy, and “directly and dramatically reduce the financial burdens of a few medical students.” Despite notifying every medical school in the US about the scholarship, The White Coat Scholarship received fewer than 400 applications. “I suspect most scholarships see even fewer applicants,” Dr. Dahle adds.

  1. MEDICAL SERVICE SCHOLARSHIPS
    Students who commit to act as a primary care physician in an underserved community for a specific amount of time can receive substantial scholarships or loan forgiveness. The National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program (NHSC SP), for example, covers the cost of tuition, fees, and educational expenses. There are also loan forgiveness programs at the state level. These are great options for those who want to positively impact underserved communities.

Some schools offer their own versions of similar programs, often designed to assist rural or urban areas. For example, SGU’s CityDoctors scholarship is offered to eligible students who commit to serve in urban hospitals affiliated with the program. Not everyone is eligible for these types of scholarships, so consult with an admissions representative to find out if you qualify.

  1. NEED-BASED AID
    You may be eligible for need-based aid from the federal government based on your family’s financial situation. You’ll first need to fill out a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which will ask for your school code. The information on your FAFSA is used to assess your financial need, which determines eligibility for both grants and loans.

Schools sometimes offer need-based grants and scholarships, but you’ll want to verify with individual schools. You will need to formally reply to your award letter to accept need-based offerings, but make sure you’ve exhausted your other scholarship options first.

  1. SCHOOL-BASED SCHOLARSHIPS
    Some institutions offer other types of awards not yet covered. It varies from one school to the next, but you might be surprised at what you’ll find. SGU, for instance, offers some unique scholarships and grants. Here are just a few of these alternative options:

The Legacy Grantis awarded to students who are the child or grandchild of an SGU MD alumni.

The Sibling Grant is offered to entering students who are the sibling of an SGU MD graduate.

The Summer Academy Scholarship is awarded to students who have previously participated in SGU’s Summer Academy Programs.

SEE HOW YOU CAN SAVE
You now have a better idea of how to get a scholarship and make your journey toward becoming a doctor more affordable. Even if you aren’t eligible for some medical school scholarships, there’s no need to panic. “The world is not going to come to an end if you don’t get this or that accolade or scholarship,” Ladd reassures. “There will be another way.”

Learn more about other ways to help cope with the cost of your education by reading our article, “How to Pay for Medical School: Doctors Share How They Did It.”

*This article was original published in February 2018. It has since been updated to reflect information relevant to 2021.

The Navy offers generous scholarships, financial assistance and continuing education programs. You can finish your education with little or no debt while learning to lead others, further distinguishing your career, enhancing your credentials and expanding the boundaries of your expertise. Plus, if you’re a student or resident, you can concentrate on your education or training, with no military/training obligation until after your program is completed.

The Navy offers two scholarship programs for medical students. With the Navy Health Professions Scholarship Program (HPSP), you may receive 100% tuition coverage during medical school, plus a monthly stipend of $2,200 to help cover living expenses for up to 48 months and a sign-on bonus of up to $20,000. With the Navy Health Services Collegiate Program (HSCP), you may receive from $157,000 to $269,000 while attending medical school, which includes a monthly military salary, a generous housing allowance, and a comprehensive healthcare benefits package.

The HPSP covers civilian medical school tuition, pays for fees, provides a monthly living stipend and includes a signing bonus under certain conditions. … This scholarship is offered by the Army, Navy and Air Force, and the benefits are the same across all three Services.

The U.S. Army offers ways to pay for medical school. Depending on your unique situation, you may be eligible for a scholarship, a stipend program or educational loan repayment. In addition, you’ll train alongside dedicated health care professionals and gain unique experience. You’ll also receive paid continuing education courses and have the opportunity to earn advanced degrees.

The F. Edward Hébert Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program pays 100 percent of your tuition, plus we will also pay for required books, equipment, most academic fees, and a generous monthly stipend of $2,000. Qualifying medical and dental students are also eligible to receive a $20,000 sign-on bonus.

Your active duty service obligation to the U.S. Army is one year of service for every year you receive the scholarship. Your minimum obligation depends on your health care field. There is an additional obligation for residency and fellowship training.

The Air Force offers scholarships for healthcare professionals including three- and four-year scholarships for the medical corps. These scholarships cover all tuition and required fees, including textbooks, small equipment items, and supplies needed for study. You will also receive a monthly allowance for living expenses. While on scholarship, you will spend 45 days on active duty in the Air Force, and once you graduate, you will serve one year of active duty for each year of scholarship, serving a minimum of three years.

Leave a Comment