Biomedical Science Master’s Programs Texas

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In this intensive program, you will have comprehensive face-to-face and online pre-medical advising, MCAT preparation, and guided medical and other clinical experiences. Upon completion, you will have developed a deep and broad understanding of biomedical disciplines, positioning you to build a robust and competitive application for medical school.

A master’s degree in biomedical sciences will broaden your opportunities in applied life sciences and prepare you for a variety of scientific careers and advanced professional degrees. In addition to bolstering a pre-med portfolio, you will be qualified to pursue careers in pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, health education, health care administration, and many other fields.

The MS in Medical Sciences degree prepares future researchers to bridge the interface between patient care and bench research, interact effectively with the spectrum of healthcare providers and community members, and function efficiently within large research teams. The curriculum is flexible and designed to provide a strong foundation in biological sciences along with scholarly activities that will encourage team-oriented projects, enhance interdisciplinary communication, develop leadership skills, and provide the foundation for a broad understanding of scientific, medical, and regulatory issues.

BENEFITS

A Master of Science in Medical Sciences will serve to:

  1. Enhance your coursework and other training to prepare you for success in medical and graduate school and in your occupations.
  2. Earn an advanced degree to increase your earning potential, job placement and advancement in the future.

Target Length of the program: 12 to 24 months depending on the number of credits taken per term (9-18 Credits)

Application deadline: June 15

PROGRAM FORMAT

The Master in Medical Sciences is available as:

  • A Master’s degree program with thesis (32 credit hours)
  • A Master’s degree program without thesis (36 credit hours)
  • A certificate program

The program is built to meet your career goals with dedicated faculty providing instruction, professional preparation, and career advisement. Over the course of one calendar year, you will receive face-to-face instruction at Bellarmine for a 9-credit intensive summer session, and two 13-credit semesters of online instruction with clinical immersion. Among the elective course offerings is a 3-credit course on medical school preparation.

  • MHS-BS Faculty
  • Sample Courses
  • Curriculum

The Biomedical Sciences (BIMS) Graduate Program is an interdepartmental program of study awarding a Master of Science (MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) through each of the five academic departments within the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences.

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Frequently Asked Questions
What could I do with this degree?
A Master of Health Science in Biomedical Sciences affords the student the opportunity to seek careers in the medical field, public health, health care leadership, teaching and research. This degree program serves as a stepping-stone for students wishing to further their education in medical school or a related biomedical sciences field.

Where do Bellarmine students complete clinical experiences?
Louisville is fortunate to have a diverse array of clinical sites. Working with a program director, students will be assigned to clinical experience sites in the Louisville metropolitan area. If the student is not from the Louisville-area, the student and director will work together to find equivalent clinical experiences nearer to their hometown. You are responsible for your own transportation, parking, and meals.

Do I need previous health care experience?
While previous experience is advantageous, it is not required.

How can I get more information about the program?
Fill out the form above or contact Sara Yount Pettingill, Dean of Graduate Admission ([email protected] or 502.272.8401) if you would like to set up an appointment or to have your transcript(s) reviewed.

One-Year Accelerated Curriculum
ONE YEAR ACCELERATED CURRICULUM

Summer Semester 1 May – August (Session II, II & IV) 9 credit hours (in-person classes)
HLTH 561 Histology (4)
HLTH 560 Human Anatomy with Regional Dissection (4)
BU 599 Career Counseling: Medical & Graduate School Application Preparation (1)

Fall Semester 2 August – December 13 credit hours (online/hy-flex classes)
HLTH 600 Health Policy (3)
HLTH 604 Current Trends and Issues in Health Care (3)
HLTH 642 Neuroscience (3)
HLTH 640 Advances in Infection, Immunity and Genomics (3)
HLTH 650 Clinical Experience I (1)

Spring Semester 3 January – May 13 credit hours (online/hy-flex classes)
PHIL 543 Bioethics (3)
HLTH 641 Advanced Physiology (3)
HLTH 643 Medical Biochemistry (3)
HLTH 651 Clinical Experience II- 1 credit
Elective 3 hours

Elective Course Options:
HLTH 652 Medical School Preparation (3)
HLTH 602 Communication & Technology (3)
HLTH 624 Introduction to Knowledge Translation: Evidence to Practice (3)

*Planned course sequence subject to change.

Course Descriptions
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
BU599 Career Counseling: Medical and Graduate School Application Preparation (1)
This course will focus on the medical and graduate school application process. Information will be presented on the process and provide ways to enhance success through guest speakers, development of a personal statement, increase in effective interviewing skills, and personal reflection.

HLTH560 Human Anatomy with Regional Dissection (4)
Regional human anatomy will be explored via cadaver dissection, focusing on upper/lower extremities, thorax and abdomen. Students will have the opportunity to perform self-directed study of anatomical regions not specifically covered in the course (head/neck, back). Six hours lecture, twelve hours lab per week.

HLTH561 Histology (4)
Functional microscopic anatomy of mammalian tissues. This course will emphasize the structural and functional relationships of normal cells, tissues, and organs and will integrate cell and molecular biological concepts. This is an intensive, graduate level course designed for students enrolled in the MHSBS Program. Eight hours lecture, eight hours lab per week.

HLTH 602 Communication and Technology in Health (3)
This course examines the social and behavioral issues impacting communication and the successful use of information technologies to support health and health care. Current issues relative to the use and management of “big data” via health care information systems will be explored – including the efficiency and usability of various technologies and datasets, the accuracy and quality of information provided, and the privacy and security of the data shared. This course will also discuss various technologies which are aimed at promoting health, preventing, diagnosing and treating diseases, and/or improving rehabilitation and long-term care.

HLTH640 Advances in Infection, Immunity, and Genomics (3)
This course will examine emerging pathogens, trends in infectious disease, advances in immunology, and applications of genomic techniques through in-depth investigation of current literature in these fields.

HLTH641 Advanced Physiology (3)
This course teaches the functions of the human body at a level required for clinical medicine. The course covers normal physiology, as well as selected diseases. Concepts are organized by systems: Cellular, Cardiovascular, Respiratory, and Renal. Additional content includes a Foundational Basics introductory section on the genetics, body fluids, autonomic nervous system and a final integration which applies the physiological principles learned to special situations (e.g., Aging, Exercise and Stress). The ultimate goal is for students to develop an understanding of the integrated functions of the normal body, “problem solving” and “critical thinking” skills when evaluating clinical situations.

HLTH642 Neuroscience (3)
This course is designed to prepare future health care professional students to apply basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology principles to patient populations. This course will emphasize the structural and functional organization of the nervous system, particularly that of central nervous system. Topics include neurophysiology, synaptic physiology and plasticity, developmental neurobiology, systems neuroscience, neuroanatomy, and neuropathology.

HLTH643 Medical Biochemistry (3)
This is a lecture-only, online course that focuses on human medical biochemistry. The goal of this course is to review the core concepts of biochemistry that apply to human health and disease and to cite specific examples of their application. Students will analyze and evaluate the most common biochemistry cited in
medical literature. Furthermore, these basics will facilitate further learning in biochemistry and the health sciences. Three credit hours.

HLTH650 Clinical Experience I (1)
This is the first of a two-course series that provides MHSBS students with clinical setting exposure and shadowing experience. Students are expected to complete a minimum of 30 hours in three clinical areas that serve populations across the lifespan, for a total of 90 hours minimum throughout the semester.

HLTH651 Clinical Experience II (1)
This is the second of a two-course series that provides MHSBS students with clinical setting exposure and shadowing experience. Students are expected to complete a minimum of 30 hours in three clinical areas observing different service delivery models, for a total of 90 hours minimum throughout the semester.

HLTH652 Medical School Prep (3)
This course, designed specifically for the MHSBS Program, is for students who plan to apply to medical school during the next year’s cycle. It includes live, online MCAT test prep (provided by Kaplan Test Prep) and a comprehensive review of the medical application process. Three credit hours. Pass/fail only.

NURS 624 Introduction to Knowledge Translation: Evidence to Practice (3)
This course examines the process of critically appraising research in order to translate current evidence into practice. Students learn to formulate clinical questions in answerable format, search for and identify best evidence, and appraise that evidence for rigor and applicability to the practice setting. This course serves as the basis for scientific inquiry, about human experiences to address important problems that require solutions and to expand the research and the evidence base for professional nursing practice.

PHIL 543 Bioethics (3)
This course applies philosophical ethical principles to the field of health care and its delivery. Intended for graduate students with experience in the health care arena, the course focuses on practical problems confronting health care providers and utilizes the professional expertise and interests of the students.

Tuition
Total estimated tuition and course fees: $24,775 Tuition will be locked in at $665 per credit hour for the entire cohort if continuously enrolled. These rates do not include any books, supplies, or additional expenses.

Prerequisites
Suggested pre-requisites for this program include completion of an undergraduate degree from an accredited institution with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0, two letters of recommendation from science faculty, and a personal statement. Standardized tests scores (GRE, MCAT, etc.) are not required but can be submitted if the student has them. Students are required to have completed the following coursework (pre-medical prerequisites) to be considered for admission to this program:

Two semesters of Biology with laboratory
General Chemistry I and II with laboratory
Organic Chemistry I and II with laboratory
At least one semester of Biochemistry (preferably two semesters)
General Physics I and II with laboratory
Calculus I and/or Statistics
General Psychology
Introductory Sociology
One semester of English (composition course)
One semester of reading comprehension course (i.e., literature)
Faculty
At Bellarmine, whether you are learning online or on-campus, you’ll receive dedicated support from passionate professors.
Dr. Steven D. Wilt, Program Director, is a developmental and molecular biologist interested in the physiology of the retinal pigment epithelium. Dr. Wilt also uses molecular biology and bioinformatics tools to study the phylogeny of tight junction molecules.

Dr. Savita Chaurasia teaches Medical Biochemistry. She is a biochemist researching plant-based natural products as sources of new drug candidates, which play a vital role in the health care system. She is also working on the green synthesis of nanoparticles which are of great significance in many industries, including food preservation, cosmetics, pharmacy, and medicine.

Dr. Sonja Bareiss teaches Neuroscience, Anatomy, Pain Neuroscience and Biophysical Agents. Her research interests are in the area of pain following central nervous system injury and neurodegenerative disease. She is particularly interested in the neuroprotective effect of exercise and other pharmacotherapies to treat chronic pain (post-spinal cord injury) and diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Dr. Christopher Wingard teaches Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Physiology and Pathology while participating in Human Performance Health Promotion I and II. His research interests have been in investigating the response of the cardiovascular system to environmental challenges including: diet, exercise and air pollution. Particular focus has been on the mechanisms underlying the responses to ischemic injuries, metabolic syndrome and inhaled xenobiotic materials.

Dr. Daniel Golemboski teaches Advances in Infection, Immunity, and Genomics. He is a microbiologist and the research in his lab is concerned with bacterial antibiotic resistance. Through the process of DNA sequencing, genome assembly, and in-depth genetic analysis he is attempting to elucidate mechanisms of antibiotic resistance and the development of virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria.

Dr. Chantal Prewitt currently teaches Anatomy and Neuroscience and participates in the Service Learning courses. Her research interests include refining pedagogy of anatomy and neuroscience, developing continuing education courses for DPTs, and use of technology in education.

Program Requirements
Student’s Advisory Committee
Degree Plan
Credit Requirements
Transfer of Credit
Limitations on the Use of Transfer, Extension and Certain Other Courses
Thesis Option
Thesis Proposal
Final Examination/Thesis Defense
Non-Thesis Option
Student’s Advisory Committee
Non-Thesis
The student’s advisory committee for the master’s degree with a non-thesis concentration will consist of only the chair selected during the first semester of enrollment. The chair of the advisory committee must be from a department within the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. Only graduate faculty members located on a campus of Texas A&M University may serve as chair of a student’s advisory committee.

Thesis
The student’s advisory committee for the master’s degree with a thesis concentration will consist of no fewer than three members of the graduate faculty representative of the student’s field(s) of study and research. The chair or the co-chair of the advisory committee must be from a department within the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences and selected during the admission process or an approved rotation schedule. At least one or more of the advisory committee members must have an appointment to a department other than the department of chair or co-chair. The chair, in consultation with the student, will select the remainder of the advisory committee. The student will interview each prospective committee member to determine whether he or she is willing to serve. Only graduate faculty members located on Texas A&M University campuses may serve as chair of a student’s advisory committee. Other graduate faculty members located off campus may serve as a member or co-chair (but not chair) with a member from a campus of Texas A&M University as the chair. The chair of the committee, who usually has immediate supervision of the student’s research and thesis, has the responsibility for calling required meetings of the committee and for calling meetings at any other time considered desirable.

For both thesis and non-thesis options, if the chair of a student’s advisory committee voluntarily leaves the University and the student is near completion of the degree and wants the chair to continue to serve in this role, the student is responsible for securing a current member of the University Graduate Faculty, from the student’s academic program and located near the Texas A&M University campus site, to serve as the co-chair of the committee. The Department Head or Chair of Intercollegiate faculty may request in writing to the Associate Provost for Graduate and Professional Studies that a faculty member who is on an approved leave of absence or has voluntarily separated from the university, be allowed to continue to serve in the role of chair of a student’s advisory committee without a co-chair for up to one year. The students should be near completion of the degree. Extensions beyond the one year period can be granted with additional approval of the Dean.

If the chair of the student’s advisory committee is unavailable for an extended time in any academic period during which the student is involved in activities relating to an internship, thesis or professional paper, and is registered for courses such as 684, 691, 692 or 693, the student may request, in writing, that the department head appoint an alternate advisory committee chair during the interim period.

The duties of the committee include responsibility for the proposed degree plan, the research proposal, the thesis and the final examination. In addition, the committee as a group and as individual members are responsible for advising the student on academic matters, and, in the case of academic deficiency, initiating recommendations to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies.

The committee members’ approval on the degree plan indicate their willingness to accept the responsibility for guiding and directing the entire academic program of the student and for initiating all academic actions concerning the student. Although individual committee members may be replaced by petition for valid reasons, a committee cannot resign en masse.

Degree Plan
The student’s advisory committee, in consultation with the student, will develop the proposed degree plan. The degree plan must be completed and filed with the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies prior to the deadline imposed by the student’s college or interdisciplinary degree program, if applicable, and no later than 90 days prior to the date of the final oral examination or thesis defense.

A student should submit the degree plan using the online Document Processing Submission System.

A student submitting a proposed degree plan for a Master of Science degree should designate on the official degree plan the appropriate program option.

Additional coursework may be added to the approved degree plan by petition if it is deemed necessary by the advisory committee to correct deficiencies in the student’s academic preparation. No changes can be made to the degree plan once the student’s Request for Final Examination or Request for Final Examination Exemption is approved by the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies.

Credit Requirement
The master’s with a non-thesis concentration requires successful completion of a minimum of 30 semester credit hours of approved coursework.
The master’s with a thesis concentration requires successful completion of a minimum of 32 semester credit hours of approved courses and research.

Ordinarily the student will devote the major portion of his or her time to work in one or two closely related fields. Other work will be in supporting fields of interest.

Transfer of Credit
A student who has earned 12 hours of graduate credit in residence at Texas A&M University may be authorized to transfer courses in excess of the limits prescribed below upon the advice of the advisory committee and with the approval of the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies. Courses taken in residence at an accredited U.S. institution or approved international institution with a final grade of B or greater may be considered for transfer credit if, at the time the courses were completed, the courses would be accepted for credit toward a similar degree for a student in degree-seeking status at the host institution. Otherwise, the limitations stated in the following section apply. Coursework in which no formal grades are given or in which grades other than letter grades (A or B) are earned (for example, CR, P, S, U, H, etc.) is not accepted for transfer credit. Courses appearing on the degree plan with grades of D, F or U may not be absolved by transfer work. Credit for thesis research or the equivalent is not transferable. Credit for coursework submitted for transfer from any college or university must be shown in semester credit hours or equated to semester credit hours. An official transcript from the university at which the transfer coursework was taken must be sent directly to the Office of Admissions.

Courses used toward a degree at another institution may not be applied for graduate credit. If the course to be transferred was taken prior to the conferral of a degree at the transfer institution, a letter from the registrar at that institution stating that the course was not applied for credit toward the degree must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies.

Grades for courses completed at other institutions are not included in computing the GPA.

Limitations on the Use of Transfer, Extension and Certain Other Courses
Some departments may have more restrictive requirements for transfer work. If otherwise acceptable, certain courses may be used toward meeting credit-hour requirements for the master’s degree under the following limitations.

The maximum number of credit hours which may be considered for transfer credit is the greater of 12 hours or one-third (1/3) of the total hours of a degree plan. The following restrictions apply:
Graduate and/or upper-level undergraduate courses taken in residence at an accredited U.S. institution, or approved international institution with a final grade of B or greater will be considered for transfer credit if, at the time the courses were completed, the student was in degree-seeking status at Texas A&M University, or the student was in degree-seeking status at the institution at which the courses were taken; and if the courses would be accepted for credit toward a similar degree for a student in degree-seeking status at the host institution.
Courses previously used for another degree are not acceptable for degree plan credit.
The maximum number of credit hours taken in post-baccalaureate non-degree (G6) classification at Texas A&M University which may be considered for application to the degree plan is 12.
A zero credit 684 or 685 course is only allowed for non-thesis option master’s students. A zero credit 681 course can be used for either thesis or non-thesis option master’s students. Other courses, including 691 research hours, are not eligible for zero credit.
Not more than 12 hours may be used in any combination of the following categories:
Not more than 8 hours in the combination of 691 (research), 684 (Professional Internship) or may be used.
Not more than 8 hours of 685 (Directed Studies) may be used.
Not more than 3 hours of 690 (Theory of Research) may be used.
Not more than 3 hours of 695 (Frontiers in Research) may be used.
A maximum of 2 hours of Seminar (681).
A maximum of 9 hours of advanced undergraduate courses (300- or 400-level).
For graduate courses of three weeks’ duration or less, taken at other institutions, up to 1 hour of credit may be obtained for each five-day week of coursework. Each week of coursework must include at least 15 contact hours.
Continuing education courses may not be used for graduate credit.
Extension courses are not acceptable for credit.
For non-distance degree programs, no more than 50 percent of the credit hours required for the program may be completed through distance education courses.

To receive a graduate degree from Texas A&M University, students must earn one-third or more of the credits through the institution’s own direct instruction. This limitation also applies to joint degree programs.

Exceptions will be permitted only in unusual cases and when petitioned by the student’s advisory committee and approved by the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies.

Thesis Option
An acceptable thesis is required for the Master of Science degree for a student who selects the thesis option program. The finished work must reflect a comprehensive understanding of the pertinent literature and express in clear English, the problem(s) for study, the method, significance and results of the student’s original research. Guidelines for the preparation of the thesis are available in the Thesis Manual, which is available online at the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies website.

After successful defense (or exemption) and approval by the student’s advisory committee and the head of the student’s major department (or chair of the intercollegiate faculty, if appropriate), the student must submit his/her thesis in electronic format as a single PDF file. The PDF file must be uploaded to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies website. Additionally, a signed paper approval form with original signatures must be received by the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies. The PDF file and the signed approval form are required by the deadline.

Deadline dates for submitting the thesis are announced each semester or summer term in the “Office of Graduate and Professional Studies Calendar” (see Time Limit statement). These dates also can be accessed via the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies website.

Each student who submits a document for review is assessed a one-time thesis/dissertation processing fee through Student Business Services. This processing fee is for the thesis/dissertation services provided. After commencement, theses and dissertations are digitally stored and made available through the Texas A&M Libraries.

A thesis that is deemed unacceptable by the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies because of excessive corrections will be returned to the student’s department head (or chair of the intercollegiate faculty, if applicable). The manuscript must be resubmitted as a new document, and the entire review process must begin again. All original submittal deadlines must be met during the resubmittal process to graduate that semester.

Thesis Proposal
For the thesis option Master of Science degree, the student must prepare a thesis proposal for approval by the advisory committee and the head of the major department or chair of the interdisciplinary faculty, if applicable. This proposal must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies at least 20 working days prior to the submission of the request for the final examination.

Compliance issues must be addressed if a graduate student is performing research involving human subjects, animals, infectious biohazards and recombinant DNA. A student involved in these types of research should check with the Office of Research Compliance and Biosafety at (979) 458-1467 to address questions about all research compliance responsibilities. Additional information can also be obtained on the Office of Research Compliance and Biosafety website.

Final Examination/Thesis Defense
A student must pass a final examination by dates announced each semester or summer term in the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies Calendar. To be eligible to take the final examination, a student’s GPA must be at least 3.000 for courses on the degree plan and for all courses completed at Texas A&M which are eligible to be applied to a graduate degree, and there must be no unabsolved grades of D, F or U for any course listed on the degree plan. To absolve a deficient grade, the student must repeat the course at Texas A&M University and achieve a grade of C or better. All coursework on the degree plan must have been completed with the exception of those hours for which the student is registered. For thesis-option students, an approved thesis proposal must be on file in the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies according to published deadlines prior to the final examination or submission of the request for exemption from the final examination.

A request to hold and announce the final examination must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies a minimum of 10 working days in advance of the scheduled date for the examination. The Office of Graduate and Professional Studies must be notified in writing of any cancellations. A student may be given only one opportunity to repeat the final examination for the master’s degree and that must be within a time period that does not extend beyond the end of the next regular semester (summer terms are excluded).

For thesis option students, the final examination covers the thesis and all work taken on the degree plan and at the option of the committee may be written or oral or both. The final examination may not be administered before the thesis is available to all members of the student’s advisory committee in substantially final form, and all members have had adequate time to review the document. The examination is conducted by the student’s advisory committee as finally constituted. A thesis option student must be registered in the University in the semester or summer term in which the final examination is taken. Persons other than members of the graduate faculty may, with mutual consent of the candidate and the major professor, attend final examinations for advanced degrees. Upon completion of the questioning of the candidate, all visitors must excuse themselves from the proceedings. A positive vote by all members of the graduate committee with at most one dissension is required to pass a student on his or her exam. A department, or interdisciplinary degree program, may have a stricter requirement provided there is consistency within all degree programs within a department or interdisciplinary degree program.

The Report of the Final Examination Form must be submitted with original signatures of only the committee members approved by the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies. If an approved committee member substitution (1 only) has been made, his/her signature must also be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies. If necessary, multiple copies of the form may be submitted with different committee member original signatures. If an approved committee member substitution (1 only) has been made, his/her signature must be included on the form submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies.

A thesis option candidate may petition to be exempt from his/her final examination provided his/her degree plan GPA is 3.500 or greater and he/she has the approval of the advisory committee, the head of the student’s major department, or intercollegiate chair, if appropriate, and the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies. It is required that the petition for exemption be submitted the same semester the student intends to submit the thesis.

Non-Thesis Option
The final examination is not required for the non-thesis option Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences. The student will instead be required to successfully complete a capstone experience defined in the curriculum of the degree program.
A student pursuing the non-thesis option is not allowed to enroll in 691 (research) for any reason and 691 may not be used for credit toward a non-thesis option Master of Science degree. A maximum of 4 credit hours of 684 (Professional Internship), 8 credit hours of 685 (Directed Studies), and up to 3 credit hours of 690 (Theory of Research) or 695 (Frontiers in Research) may be used toward the non-thesis option Master of Science degree. In addition, any combination of 684, 685, 690 and 695 may not exceed 25 percent of the total credit hour requirement shown on the individual degree plan. All requirements for the non-thesis option Master of Science degree other than those specified above are the same as for the thesis option degree.

Additional Requirements
Residence
Continuous Registration
Time Limit
Foreign Languages
Application for Degree
Residence
In partial fulfillment of the residence requirement for the degree of Master of Science, the student must complete 9 resident credit hours during one regular semester or one 10-week summer semester in resident study at Texas A&M University. Upon recommendation of the student’s advisory committee, department head or Chair of the Interdisciplinary Program, if appropriate, and with approval of the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies, a student may be granted exemption from this requirement. Such a petition, however, must be approved prior to the student’s registration for the final 9 credit hours of required coursework.

Students who are employed full-time while completing their degree may fulfill total residence requirements by completion of less-than-full time course loads each semester. In order to be considered for this, the student is required to submit a Petition for Waivers and Exceptions along with verification of his/her employment to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies.

See Residence Requirements.

Continuous Registration
A student in the thesis option of the Master of Science program who has completed all coursework on his/her degree plan other than 691 (research) is required to be in continuous registration until all requirements for the degree have been completed. See Continuous Registration Requirements.

Time Limit
All degree requirements must be completed within a period of seven consecutive years for the degree to be granted. A course will be considered valid until seven years after the end of the semester in which it is taken. Graduate credit for coursework which is more than seven calendar years old at the time of the final examination (oral or written) may not be used to satisfy degree requirements.

A student who has chosen the thesis option must have the final corrected version of the thesis cleared by the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies no later than one year after the final examination, or approval of a petition for exemption from the final exam, or within the seven-year time limit, whichever occurs first. Failure to do so will result in the degree not being awarded.

Foreign Languages
No specific language requirement exists for the Master of Science degree.

Application for Degree
For information on applying for your degree, please visit the Graduation section.

MASTER OF SCIENCE (MS) NON-THESIS

Program Overview

The BIMS MS Non-Thesis degree program equips students with a strong foundation in the biomedical sciences and provides an educational experience that positions students to achieve their aspirations of becoming health professionals.

The majority of BIMS MS Non-Thesis students have the goal of pursing a professional program of study in one of the various fields of medicine. With 30 semester credit hours of science courses and electives, this program offers students the opportunity to strengthen their professional program application by:

  • Improving academic preparation in foundational subjects related to biomedical sciences
  • Raising science grade point average (GPA), upper level science GPA, and last 45-hour GPA
  • Staying academically engaged while preparing for standardized tests, working part-time, or participating in clinical shadowing

Students have the flexibility of progressing through the program carrying a full or part-time academic load. While the majority of students complete the program in four semesters with full-time enrollment, it is important to note that many progress through the program while working part-time jobs and/or participating in clinical shadowing opportunities.

During the first semester of the program, students select a graduate faculty mentor. This faculty mentor supports students by providing mentorship, guiding and approving coursework selection, and overseeing the capstone experience, a hallmark for improving a student’s competitiveness for both admission and success in their chosen professional program.

BIMS MS Non-Thesis students are also supported by a full-time staff academic advisor in the CVM Office for Research & Graduate Studies. The academic advisor guides students through the logistical pieces of the graduate experience by helping students meet programmatic and university milestones and deadlines, assisting with class registration, and connecting students with college and university resources.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES
The Biomedical Sciences (BIMS) Graduate Program is an
interdepartmental program of study awarding a Master of Science
(MS) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) through each of the five
academic departments (http://catalog.tamu.edu/graduate/collegesschools-interdisciplinary/veterinary-medicine-biomedical-sciences/

departmentstext) within the College of Veterinary Medicine &

Biomedical Sciences. Focusing on cross-disciplinary education and
training in the biomedical sciences and the numerous associated
domains of research, the faculty teach and mentor students in fields that
have a critical mass of faculty, exceptional productivity, and international
recognition. These areas of research strength include:
• Biomedical Genomics and Bioinformatics
• Diagnostics and Therapeutics
• Infection, Immunity, and Epidemiology
• Physiology and Developmental Biology
There are two MS options available from which a student may choose,
the thesis concentration and the non-thesis concentration. The Master
of Science in Biomedical Sciences with a Thesis concentration provides
an academic and research experience that educates students within the
context of cross-disciplinary knowledge and prepares students to excel in
a research career in areas as diverse as academia, government, industry,
and others. Additionally, a Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences
with a Non-Thesis concentration has a curriculum designed for students
who wish to gain academic preparation beyond the undergraduate
degree before entering a professional program of study or employment in
healthcare.
Additional details, including information about the admissions process,
can be found at http://vetmed.tamu.edu/graduate/biomedical-sciences
(http://vetmed.tamu.edu/graduate/biomedical-sciences/).
Steps to Fulfill a Masters Program (http://catalog.tamu.edu/
graduate/academic-expectations-general-degree-requirements/

stepstofulfillagraduateprogramtext)

Program Requirements
Program Requirements
• Student’s Advisory Committee (p. 1)
• Degree Plan (p. 2)
• Credit Requirements (p. 2)
• Transfer of Credit (p. 2)
• Limitations on the Use of Transfer, Extension and Certain Other
Courses (p. 2)
• Thesis Option (p. 3)
• Thesis Proposal (p. 3)
• Final Examination/Thesis Defense (p. 3)
• Non-Thesis Option (p. 4)
Student’s Advisory Committee
Non-Thesis
The student’s advisory committee for the master’s degree with a nonthesis concentration will consist of only the chair selected during
the first semester of enrollment. The chair of the advisory committee
must be from a department within the College of Veterinary Medicine
& Biomedical Sciences. Only graduate faculty members located on
a campus of Texas A&M University may serve as chair of a student’s
advisory committee.
Thesis
The student’s advisory committee for the master’s degree with a thesis
concentration will consist of no fewer than three members of the
graduate faculty representative of the student’s field(s) of study and
research. The chair or the co-chair of the advisory committee must
be from a department within the College of Veterinary Medicine &
Biomedical Sciences and selected during the admission process or
an approved rotation schedule. At least one or more of the advisory
committee members must have an appointment to a department other
than the department of chair or co-chair. The chair, in consultation with
the student, will select the remainder of the advisory committee. The
student will interview each prospective committee member to determine
whether he or she is willing to serve. Only graduate faculty members
located on Texas A&M University campuses may serve as chair of a
student’s advisory committee. Other graduate faculty members located
off campus may serve as a member or co-chair (but not chair) with a
member from a campus of Texas A&M University as the chair. The chair
of the committee, who usually has immediate supervision of the student’s
research and thesis, has the responsibility for calling required meetings
of the committee and for calling meetings at any other time considered
desirable.
For both thesis and non-thesis options, if the chair of a student’s advisory
committee voluntarily leaves the University and the student is near
completion of the degree and wants the chair to continue to serve in
this role, the student is responsible for securing a current member of the
University Graduate Faculty, from the student’s academic program and
located near the Texas A&M University campus site, to serve as the cochair of the committee. The Department Head or Chair of Intercollegiate
faculty may request in writing to the Associate Provost for Graduate
and Professional Studies that a faculty member who is on an approved
leave of absence or has voluntarily separated from the university, be
allowed to continue to serve in the role of chair of a student’s advisory
committee without a co-chair for up to one year. The students should be
near completion of the degree. Extensions beyond the one year period
can be granted with additional approval of the Dean.
If the chair of the student’s advisory committee is unavailable for an
extended time in any academic period during which the student is
involved in activities relating to an internship, thesis or professional
paper, and is registered for courses such as 684, 691, 692 or 693, the
student may request, in writing, that the department head appoint an
alternate advisory committee chair during the interim period.
The duties of the committee include responsibility for the proposed
degree plan, the research proposal, the thesis and the final examination.
In addition, the committee as a group and as individual members are
responsible for advising the student on academic matters, and, in the
case of academic deficiency, initiating recommendations to the Office of
Graduate and Professional Studies.
The committee members’ approval on the degree plan indicate their
willingness to accept the responsibility for guiding and directing the
entire academic program of the student and for initiating all academic
actions concerning the student. Although individual committee members
2 Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences
may be replaced by petition for valid reasons, a committee cannot
resign en masse.
Degree Plan
The student’s advisory committee, in consultation with the student, will
develop the proposed degree plan. The degree plan must be completed
and filed with the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies prior to
the deadline imposed by the student’s college or interdisciplinary degree
program, if applicable, and no later than 90 days prior to the date of the
final oral examination or thesis defense.
A student should submit the degree plan using the online Document
Processing Submission System (http://ogsdpss.tamu.edu).
A student submitting a proposed degree plan for a Master of Science
degree should designate on the official degree plan the appropriate
program option.
Additional coursework may be added to the approved degree plan
by petition if it is deemed necessary by the advisory committee to
correct deficiencies in the student’s academic preparation. No changes
can be made to the degree plan once the student’s Request for Final
Examination or Request for Final Examination Exemption is approved by
the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies.
Credit Requirement
The master’s with a non-thesis concentration requires successful
completion of a minimum of 30 semester credit hours of approved
coursework.
The master’s with a thesis concentration requires successful completion
of a minimum of 32 semester credit hours of approved courses and
research.
Ordinarily the student will devote the major portion of his or her time to
work in one or two closely related fields. Other work will be in supporting
fields of interest.
Transfer of Credit
A student who has earned 12 hours of graduate credit in residence at
Texas A&M University may be authorized to transfer courses in excess
of the limits prescribed below upon the advice of the advisory committee
and with the approval of the Office of Graduate and Professional
Studies. Courses taken in residence at an accredited U.S. institution or
approved international institution with a final grade of B or greater may be
considered for transfer credit if, at the time the courses were completed,
the courses would be accepted for credit toward a similar degree for a
student in degree-seeking status at the host institution. Otherwise, the
limitations stated in the following section apply. Coursework in which
no formal grades are given or in which grades other than letter grades
(A or B) are earned (for example, CR, P, S, U, H, etc.) is not accepted for
transfer credit. Courses appearing on the degree plan with grades of D,
F or U may not be absolved by transfer work. Credit for thesis research
or the equivalent is not transferable. Credit for coursework submitted for
transfer from any college or university must be shown in semester credit
hours or equated to semester credit hours. An official transcript from
the university at which the transfer coursework was taken must be sent
directly to the Office of Admissions.
Courses used toward a degree at another institution may not be applied
for graduate credit. If the course to be transferred was taken prior to
the conferral of a degree at the transfer institution, a letter from the
registrar at that institution stating that the course was not applied for
credit toward the degree must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and
Professional Studies.
Grades for courses completed at other institutions are not included in
computing the GPA.
Limitations on the Use of Transfer,
Extension and Certain Other Courses
Some departments may have more restrictive requirements for transfer
work. If otherwise acceptable, certain courses may be used toward
meeting credit-hour requirements for the master’s degree under the
following limitations.

  1. The maximum number of credit hours which may be considered for
    transfer credit is the greater of 12 hours or one-third (1/3) of the total
    hours of a degree plan. The following restrictions apply:
    • Graduate and/or upper-level undergraduate courses taken
    in residence at an accredited U.S. institution, or approved
    international institution with a final grade of B or greater will be
    considered for transfer credit if, at the time the courses were
    completed, the student was in degree-seeking status at Texas
    A&M University, or the student was in degree-seeking status at
    the institution at which the courses were taken; and if the courses
    would be accepted for credit toward a similar degree for a student
    in degree-seeking status at the host institution.
    • Courses previously used for another degree are not acceptable for
    degree plan credit.
  2. The maximum number of credit hours taken in post-baccalaureate
    non-degree (G6) classification at Texas A&M University which may be
    considered for application to the degree plan is 12.
  3. A zero credit 684 or 685 course is only allowed for non-thesis
    option master’s students. A zero credit 681 course can be used for
    either thesis or non-thesis option master’s students. Other courses,
    including 691 research hours, are not eligible for zero credit.
  4. Not more than 12 hours may be used in any combination of the
    following categories:
    • Not more than 8 hours in the combination of 691 (research), 684
    (Professional Internship) or may be used.
    • Not more than 8 hours of 685 (Directed Studies) may be used.
    • Not more than 3 hours of 690 (Theory of Research) may be used.
    • Not more than 3 hours of 695 (Frontiers in Research) may be
    used.
  5. A maximum of 2 hours of Seminar (681).
  6. A maximum of 9 hours of advanced undergraduate courses (300- or
    400-level).
  7. For graduate courses of three weeks’ duration or less, taken at other
    institutions, up to 1 hour of credit may be obtained for each five-day
    week of coursework. Each week of coursework must include at least
    15 contact hours.
  8. Continuing education courses may not be used for graduate credit.
  9. Extension courses are not acceptable for credit.
  10. For non-distance degree programs, no more than 50 percent of the
    credit hours required for the program may be completed through
    distance education courses.
  11. To receive a graduate degree from Texas A&M University, students
    must earn one-third or more of the credits through the institution’s
    Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences 3
    own direct instruction. This limitation also applies to joint degree
    programs.
    Exceptions will be permitted only in unusual cases and when petitioned
    by the student’s advisory committee and approved by the Office of
    Graduate and Professional Studies.
    Thesis Option
    An acceptable thesis is required for the Master of Science degree for
    a student who selects the thesis option program. The finished work
    must reflect a comprehensive understanding of the pertinent literature
    and express in clear English, the problem(s) for study, the method,
    significance and results of the student’s original research. Guidelines
    for the preparation of the thesis are available in the Thesis Manual,
    which is available online at the Office of Graduate and Professional
    Studies website.
    After successful defense (or exemption) and approval by the student’s
    advisory committee and the head of the student’s major department
    (or chair of the intercollegiate faculty, if appropriate), the student must
    submit his/her thesis in electronic format as a single PDF file. The
    PDF file must be uploaded to the Office of Graduate and Professional
    Studies website. Additionally, a signed paper approval form with original
    signatures must be received by the Office of Graduate and Professional
    Studies. The PDF file and the signed approval form are required by the
    deadline.
    Deadline dates for submitting the thesis are announced each semester
    or summer term in the “Office of Graduate and Professional Studies
    Calendar” (see Time Limit statement). These dates also can be accessed
    via the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies website.
    Each student who submits a document for review is assessed a onetime thesis/dissertation processing fee through Student Business
    Services. This processing fee is for the thesis/dissertation services
    provided. After commencement, theses and dissertations are digitally
    stored and made available through the Texas A&M Libraries.
    A thesis that is deemed unacceptable by the Office of Graduate and
    Professional Studies because of excessive corrections will be returned
    to the student’s department head (or chair of the intercollegiate faculty,
    if applicable). The manuscript must be resubmitted as a new document,
    and the entire review process must begin again. All original submittal
    deadlines must be met during the resubmittal process to graduate that
    semester.
    Thesis Proposal
    For the thesis option Master of Science degree, the student must prepare
    a thesis proposal for approval by the advisory committee and the head
    of the major department or chair of the interdisciplinary faculty, if
    applicable. This proposal must be submitted to the Office of Graduate
    and Professional Studies at least 20 working days prior to the submission
    of the request for the final examination.
    Compliance issues must be addressed if a graduate student is
    performing research involving human subjects, animals, infectious
    biohazards and recombinant DNA. A student involved in these types
    of research should check with the Office of Research Compliance and
    Biosafety at (979) 458-1467 to address questions about all research
    compliance responsibilities. Additional information can also be obtained
    on the Office of Research Compliance and Biosafety website.
    Final Examination/Thesis Defense
    A student must pass a final examination by dates announced each
    semester or summer term in the Office of Graduate and Professional
    Studies Calendar. To be eligible to take the final examination, a student’s
    GPA must be at least 3.000 for courses on the degree plan and for all
    courses completed at Texas A&M which are eligible to be applied to a
    graduate degree, and there must be no unabsolved grades of D, F or U
    for any course listed on the degree plan. To absolve a deficient grade, the
    student must repeat the course at Texas A&M University and achieve a
    grade of C or better. All coursework on the degree plan must have been
    completed with the exception of those hours for which the student is
    registered. For thesis-option students, an approved thesis proposal must
    be on file in the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies according to
    published deadlines prior to the final examination or submission of the
    request for exemption from the final examination.
    A request to hold and announce the final examination must be submitted
    to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies a minimum of 10
    working days in advance of the scheduled date for the examination. The
    Office of Graduate and Professional Studies must be notified in writing of
    any cancellations. A student may be given only one opportunity to repeat
    the final examination for the master’s degree and that must be within
    a time period that does not extend beyond the end of the next regular
    semester (summer terms are excluded).
    For thesis option students, the final examination covers the thesis and
    all work taken on the degree plan and at the option of the committee may
    be written or oral or both. The final examination may not be administered
    before the thesis is available to all members of the student’s advisory
    committee in substantially final form, and all members have had
    adequate time to review the document. The examination is conducted
    by the student’s advisory committee as finally constituted. A thesis
    option student must be registered in the University in the semester or
    summer term in which the final examination is taken. Persons other
    than members of the graduate faculty may, with mutual consent of
    the candidate and the major professor, attend final examinations for
    advanced degrees. Upon completion of the questioning of the candidate,
    all visitors must excuse themselves from the proceedings. A positive vote
    by all members of the graduate committee with at most one dissension
    is required to pass a student on his or her exam. A department, or
    interdisciplinary degree program, may have a stricter requirement
    provided there is consistency within all degree programs within a
    department or interdisciplinary degree program.
    The Report of the Final Examination Form must be submitted with
    original signatures of only the committee members approved by the
    Office of Graduate and Professional Studies. If an approved committee
    member substitution (1 only) has been made, his/her signature must
    also be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies. If
    necessary, multiple copies of the form may be submitted with different
    committee member original signatures. If an approved committee
    member substitution (1 only) has been made, his/her signature must
    be included on the form submitted to the Office of Graduate and
    Professional Studies.
    A thesis option candidate may petition to be exempt from his/her final
    examination provided his/her degree plan GPA is 3.500 or greater and he/
    she has the approval of the advisory committee, the head of the student’s
    major department, or intercollegiate chair, if appropriate, and the Office
    of Graduate and Professional Studies. It is required that the petition
    4 Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences
    for exemption be submitted the same semester the student intends to
    submit the thesis.
    Non-Thesis Option
    The final examination is not required for the non-thesis option Master of
    Science in Biomedical Sciences. The student will instead be required to
    successfully complete a capstone experience defined in the curriculum of
    the degree program.
    A student pursuing the non-thesis option is not allowed to enroll in 691
    (research) for any reason and 691 may not be used for credit toward a
    non-thesis option Master of Science degree. A maximum of 4 credit hours
    of 684 (Professional Internship), 8 credit hours of 685 (Directed Studies),
    and up to 3 credit hours of 690 (Theory of Research) or 695 (Frontiers in
    Research) may be used toward the non-thesis option Master of Science
    degree. In addition, any combination of 684, 685, 690 and 695 may not
    exceed 25 percent of the total credit hour requirement shown on the
    individual degree plan. All requirements for the non-thesis option Master
    of Science degree other than those specified above are the same as for
    the thesis option degree.
    Additional Requirements
    Additional Requirements
    • Residence (p. 4)
    • Continuous Registration (p. 4)
    • Time Limit (p. 4)
    • Foreign Languages (p. 4)
    • Application for Degree (p. 4)
    Residence
    In partial fulfillment of the residence requirement for the degree of Master
    of Science, the student must complete 9 resident credit hours during one
    regular semester or one 10-week summer semester in resident study at
    Texas A&M University. Upon recommendation of the student’s advisory
    committee, department head or Chair of the Interdisciplinary Program, if
    appropriate, and with approval of the Office of Graduate and Professional
    Studies, a student may be granted exemption from this requirement. Such
    a petition, however, must be approved prior to the student’s registration
    for the final 9 credit hours of required coursework.
    Students who are employed full-time while completing their degree
    may fulfill total residence requirements by completion of less-than-full
    time course loads each semester. In order to be considered for this, the
    student is required to submit a Petition for Waivers and Exceptions along
    with verification of his/her employment to the Office of Graduate and
    Professional Studies.
    See Residence Requirements (http://catalog.tamu.edu/graduate/
    academic-expectations-general-degree-requirements/degreerequirements/).
    Continuous Registration
    A student in the thesis option of the Master of Science program who
    has completed all coursework on his/her degree plan other than
    691 (research) is required to be in continuous registration until all
    requirements for the degree have been completed. See Continuous
    Registration Requirements (http://catalog.tamu.edu/graduate/academicexpectations-general-degree-requirements/registration-academicstatus/).

POST-GRADUATION

Medical TechnicianUpon entering the university, students must be aware that there is nothing to guarantee employment upon graduation. However, the depth of training in the sciences and emphasis on the application of knowledge to health problem solving does help to enable Biomedical Science graduates to secure productive careers in a wide variety of biomedical endeavors encompassing both human and veterinary medicine.

Opportunities fall into three major categories as follows:

Professional School Preparation
Allied Health School Preparation
Graduate Study Preparation
PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL PREPARATION
Biomedical Science graduates enter schools of human medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, osteopathy, podiatry, and law. All of the preprofessional course requirements for any of these can be completed while registered in the Biomedical Science curriculum.

Texas Professional Schools
Texas has the distinction of having a large number of world class health professional schools, colleges and programs.

Note: This is NOT a comprehensive listing. Some schools do not provide information via the Internet.

Texas Medical Schools
Baylor College of Medicine
Texas A&M Health Science Center
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center – Lubbock
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center – El Paso
University of North Texas Health Science Center – TCOM
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center – Dallas
Texas Chiropractic Schools
Parker University – College of Chiropractic
Texas Chiropractic College
3+3 Program with Texas Chiropractice College
Texas Dental Schools
Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry
University of Texas HSC at Houston – School of Dentistry
University of Texas HSC at San Antonio – Dental School
Texas Health Care Administration Programs
Dallas Baptist University
Midwestern State University
Texas State University School of Health Administration
Texas Southern University
Trinity University Health Care Administration Program
University of Houston – Clear Lake
University of Texas at Arlington
Texas Optometry College
University of Houston – College of Optometry
University of the Incarnate Word – Rosenberg School of Optometry
Texas Pharmacy Programs
Texas A&M HSC – Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy
Texas Southern University – College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
Texas Tech University HSC – School of Pharmacy
University of Houston – College of Pharmacy
University of the Incarnate Word – Feik School of Pharmacy
University of North Texas HSC – College of Pharmacy
University of Texas at Austin – College of Pharmacy
University of Texas at Tyler – Ben and Maytee Fisch College of Pharmacy (opening Fall 2015)
Texas Veterinary Colleges
Texas A&M University – College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
Texas Public Health Schools
Texas A&M HSC – School of Public Health
University of North Texas HSC – School of Public Health
University of Texas HSC at Houston – School of Public Health
Acceptance Rates
This link offers a PDF listing by the major, MCAT score, and science GPR for all Aggies accepted to the 9 Texas medical schools for the previous fall semester. It provides a useful insight to the current number of Biomedical Science students accepted to these medical schools.

Texas Medical School Acceptance Rates

This link offers a PDF listing by the major, DAT score, and science GPR for all Aggies accepted to the 3 Texas dental schools for the previous fall semester. It provides a useful insight to the current number of Biomedical Science students accepted to these dental schools.

Texas Dental School Acceptance Rates

ALLIED HEALTH SCHOOL PREPARATION
Students and graduates complete the basic course work required by allied health schools and related training programs. Such schools and programs include nursing, medical technology, pharmacy, optometry, physical therapy, dental hygiene, radiation technology, health care administration, medical transcription, occupational therapy, recreation therapy, and dietetics. In the interest of time and efficient use of credit hours, students should have their vocational goals identified no later than the end of the freshman year and preferably on entry into college work.

Texas Allied Health Schools
Sample TubesTexas has a large number of allied health science programs/schools. Such schools and programs include nursing, medical technology, pharmacy, optometry, physical therapy, chiropractic, dental hygiene, radiation technology, health care administration, medical transcription, occupational therapy, recreation therapy, and dietetics.

Note: This is NOT a comprehensive listing. Some schools do not provide information via the Internet.

Baylor College of Medicine – School of Allied Health Sciences
Texas State University – College of Health Professions
Texas Tech University HSC – School of Allied Health Sciences
Texas Woman’s University – School of Physical Therapy
University of Texas at El Paso – School of Nursing
University of Texas HSC at Houston – School of Biomedical Informatics
University of Texas HSC at San Antonio – School of Health Professions
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center – School of Health Professions
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston – School of Health Professions
University of Texas Southwestern – School of Health Professions
GRADUATE STUDY PREPARATION
A baccalaureate degree is insufficient for a full and satisfying career for many people. Additional formal education and training is desired and often required. Postgraduate education is built on sound undergraduate study. The Biomedical Science curriculum provides a superior option in preparation for graduate study in a wide range of fields in the life sciences. Graduates can earn master of science (M.S.) and doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in preparation for productive careers in research and teaching, as well as employment in industry and government.

Texas Graduate Schools of Biomedical Sciences
Texas has a number of graduate education programs/ schools in biomedical sciences. Graduates can earn master of science (M.S.) and doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in preparation for productive careers in research and teaching, as well as employment in industry and government.

Note: This is NOT a comprehensive listing. Some schools do not provide information via the Internet.