Lupus

In this ccontent you’d find the definition of Lupus, systemic lupus erythematosus signs and symptoms, what causes Luous, lupus cure and lupus drugs. So read on

Lupus (SLE) can affect the joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, brain, heart and lungs.Symptoms vary but can include fatigue, joint pain, rash and fever. These can periodically get worse (flare up) and then improve.While there’s no cure for lupus, current treatments focus on improving quality of life through controlling symptoms and minimising flare-ups. This begins with lifestyle modifications, including sun protection and diet. Further disease management includes medication such as anti-inflammatories and steroids. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), is the most common type of lupus. SLE is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks its own tissues, causing widespread inflammation and tissue damage in the affected organs. It can affect the joints, skin, brain, lungs, kidneys, and blood vessels. There is no cure for lupus, but medical interventions and lifestyle changes can help control it. The seriousness of SLE can range from mild to life-threatening. The disease should be treated by a doctor or a team of doctors who specialize in care of SLE patients. People with lupus that get proper medical care, preventive care, and education can significantly improve function and quality of life.

systemic lupus erythematosus signs and symptoms

The term lupus has been used to identify a number of immune diseases that have similar clinical presentations and laboratory features, but SLE is the most common type of lupus. People are often referring to SLE when they say lupus. Read further to see more of Lupus, systemic lupus erythematosus signs and symptoms, what causes Luous, lupus cure and lupus drugs.

SLE is a chronic disease that can have phases of worsening symptoms that alternate with periods of mild symptoms. Most people with SLE are able to live a normal life with treatment.

According to the Lupus Foundation of America, at least 1.5 million Americans are living with diagnosed lupus. The foundation believes that the number of people who actually have the condition is much higher and that many cases go undiagnosed.

Symptoms vary but can include fatigue, joint pain, rash and fever. These can periodically get worse (flare up) and then improve.


People may experience:Pain areas: in the muscles pain types: can be sharp in the chest pain circumstances: can occur while breathing whole body: anaemia, fatigue, fever, or malaise hair: hair loss or loss of scalp hair skin: red rashes or scaly rashes mouth: dryness or ulcers also common: anxiety, blood in urine, butterfly rash, clinical depression, flare, headache, joint stiffness, photophobia, Raynaud’s, swelling, water retention, or weight loss.

what causes lupus

Hormones are the body’s messengers. They regulate many of the body’s functions. Because nine of every 10 occurrences of lupus are in females, researchers have looked at the relationship between estrogen and lupus.

While men and women both produce estrogen, its production is much greater in females. Many women have more lupus symptoms before menstrual periods and/or during pregnancy when estrogen production is high. This may indicate that estrogen somehow regulates the severity of lupus. However, no causal effect has been proven between estrogen, or any other hormone, and lupus. And, studies of women with lupus taking estrogen in either birth control pills or as postmenopausal therapy have shown no increase in significant disease activity. Researchers are now focusing on differences between men and women, beyond hormone levels, which may account for why women are more prone to lupus and other autoimmune diseases.

Genetics

Researchers have now identified more than 50 genes which they associate with lupus. These genes are more commonly seen in people with lupus than in those without the disease, and while most of these genes have not been shown to directly cause lupus, they are believed to contribute to it.

In most cases, genes are not enough.  This is especially evident with twins who are raised in the same environment and have the same inherited features yet only one develops lupus. Although, when one of two identical twins has lupus, there is an increased chance that the other twin will also develop the disease (30% chance for identical twins; 5-10% chance for fraternal twins).

Most researchers today think that an environmental agent, such as a virus or possibly a chemical, randomly encountered by a genetically susceptible individual, acts to trigger the disease. Researchers have not identified a specific environmental agent as yet but the hypothesis remains likely.

  • Sun-sensitizing tetracycline drugs such as minocycline (Minocin®)
  • Penicillin or other antibiotic drugs such as: amoxicillin (Amoxil®); ampicillin (Ampicillin Sodium ADD-Vantage®); cloxacillin (Cloxapen®)
  • Infection, colds or viral illnesses
  • Exhaustion
  • Emotional stress, such as divorce, illness, death in the family, or other life complications
  • Anything else that causes stress to the body such as surgery, physical harm, injury, pregnancy, or giving birth
  • Sun-sensitizing tetracycline drugs such as minocycline (Minocin®)
  • Penicillin or other antibiotic drugs such as: amoxicillin (Amoxil®); ampicillin (Ampicillin Sodium ADD-Vantage®); cloxacillin (Cloxapen®)
  • Infection, colds or viral illnesses
  • Exhaustion
  • Emotional stress, such as divorce, illness, death in the family, or other life complications
  • Anything else that causes stress to the body such as surgery, physical harm, injury, pregnancy, or giving birth
  • Sun-sensitizing tetracycline drugs such as minocycline (Minocin®)
  • Penicillin or other antibiotic drugs such as: amoxicillin (Amoxil®); ampicillin (Ampicillin Sodium ADD-Vantage®); cloxacillin (Cloxapen®)
  • Infection, colds or viral illnesses
  • Exhaustion
  • Emotional stress, such as divorce, illness, death in the family, or other life complications
  • Anything else that causes stress to the body such as surgery, physical harm, injury, pregnancy, or giving birth

Sun-sensitizing tetracycline drugs such as minocycline (Minocin®)

Penicillin or other antibiotic drugs such as: amoxicillin (Amoxil®); ampicillin (Ampicillin Sodium ADD-Vantage®); cloxacillin (Cloxapen®)

Infection, colds or viral illnesses

Exhaustion

Emotional stress, such as divorce, illness, death in the family, or other life complications

Anything else that causes stress to the body such as surgery, physical harm, injury, pregnancy, or giving birth

Lupus Cure

Lupus is a chronic disease with no cure.This means that you can manage it with treatment, but it will not go away. Treatment can help improve your symptoms, prevent flares, and prevent other health problems often caused by lupus. While there’s no cure for lupus, current treatments focus on improving quality of life through controlling symptoms and minimising flare-ups. This begins with lifestyle modifications, including sun protection and diet. Further disease management includes medication such as anti-inflammatories and steroids.

There’s no cure for lupus at present. However, the condition can respond well to a number of drugs. The earlier treatment is started, the more effective it’s likely to be.

  • Drugs
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
  • Steroids
  • Antimalarials
  • Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs)
  • Biological therapies
  • Other treatments

Lupus Drugs

The drugs used to treat lupus will depend on how serious it is and which parts of your body are affected. Your treatments will probably be changed or adjusted as your symptoms flare up or improve. Many drugs used to treat lupus were originally developed for other conditions but were later found to be useful in lupus.