map4c online course

Last Updated on August 8, 2022 by Team College Learners

Grade 12 College Math allows students to broaden their understanding of the real-world applications of mathematics. Throughout this course, students will learn to reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems in various areas.

Summary Of Units And Timelines For Grade 12 Foundations For College Mathematics MAP4C

Below is the suggested sequence of course unit delivery as well as the recommended number of hours to complete the respective unit. For complete details of targeted expectations within each unit and activity, please see each Unit Overview found in the MAP4C course profile.

Unit OrderUnit NameSuggested Time
Unit 1Algebraic Skills20 Hours
Unit 2Budgets15 Hours
Unit 3Trigonometry15 Hours
MID SEMESTER POINT
Unit 4Measurements15 Hours
Unit 5Graphical Models15 Hours
Unit 6Exponents15 Hours
Unit 7Finance13 Hours
FINALFinal Exam2 Hours
Total110 Hours

Please be aware that, as per Ministry guidelines, OVS has a mandatory minimum requirement of 14 days enrollment for students to be eligible for a midterm report card and 28 days enrollment to be eligible for a final report card.

Fundamental Concepts Covered In Grade 12 Online Course

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of real-world applicationsof mathematics. Students will analyse data using statistical methods; solve problemsinvolving applications of geometry and trigonometry; solve financial problems connected with annuities, budgets, and renting or owning accommodation; simplifyexpressions; and solve equations. Students will reason mathematically and communicatetheir thinking as they solve multi-step problems. This course prepares students for college programs in areas such as business, health sciences, and human services, and for certain skilled trades.

Teaching And Learning Strategies In An Online School

The mathematical processes are to be integrated into student learning in all areas of this course.
Throughout this course, students will:

  • Problem Solving – develop, select, apply, compare, and adapt a variety of problem-solving strategies as they pose and solve problems and conduct investigations, to help deepen their mathematical understanding
  • Reasoning and Proving – develop and apply reasoning skills (e.g., use of inductive reasoning, deductive
    reasoning, and counter-examples; construction of proofs) to make mathematical
    conjectures, assess conjectures, and justify conclusions, and plan and construct
    organized mathematical arguments;
  • Reflecting – demonstrate that they are reflecting on and monitoring their thinking to help clarify their understanding as they complete an investigation or solve a problem (e.g., by assessing the effectiveness of strategies and processes used, by proposing alternative approaches, by judging the reasonableness of results, by verifying solutions)
  • Selecting Tools and Computational Strategies – select and use a variety of concrete, visual, and electronic learning tools and appropriate computational strategies to investigate mathematical ideas and to solve problems
  • Connecting – make connections among mathematical concepts and procedures, and relate mathematical ideas to situations or phenomena drawn from other contexts (e.g., other curriculum areas, daily life, current events, art and culture, sports)
  • Representing – create a variety of representations of mathematical ideas (e.g., numeric, geometric, algebraic, graphical, pictorial representations; onscreen dynamic representations), connect and compare them, and select and apply the appropriate representations to solve problems
  • Communicating – communicate mathematical thinking orally, visually, and in writing, using precise mathematical vocabulary and a variety of appropriate representations, and observing mathematical conventions

Assessment & Evaluation

As summarized in Growing Success 2010, the primary purpose of assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning. Information gathered through assessment helps teachers to determine students’ strengths and weaknesses in their achievement of the curriculum expectations in each course.

This information also serves to guide teachers in adapting curriculum and instructional approaches to students’ needs and in assessing the overall effectiveness of programs and classroom practices. As part of assessment, teachers provide students with descriptive feedback that guides their efforts towards improvement. Evaluation refers to the process of judging the quality of student work on the basis of established criteria, and assigning a value to represent that quality. All curriculum expectations must be accounted for in instruction, but evaluation focuses on students’ achievement of the overall expectations.

A students’ achievement of the overall expectations is evaluated on the basis of his or her achievement of related specific expectations. Teachers will use their professional judgement to determine which specific expectations should be used to evaluate achievement of overall expectations, and which ones will be covered in instruction and assessment but not necessarily evaluated. In order to ensure that assessment and evaluation are valid and reliable, and that they lead to the improvement of student learning, teachers must use assessment and evaluation strategies that:

  • Address both what students learn and how well they learn
  • Are based both on the categories of knowledge and skills and on the achievement level descriptions given in the achievement chart
  • Are varied in nature, administered over a period of time, and designed to provide opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning
  • Are appropriate for the learning activities used, the purposes of instruction, and the needs and experiences of the students
  • Are fair to all students
  • Accommodate students with special education needs, consistent with the strategies outlined in their Individual Education Plan
  • Accommodate the needs of students who are learning the language of instruction
  • Ensure that each student is given clear directions for improvement
  • Promote students’ ability to assess their own learning and to set specific goals
  • Include the use of samples of students’ work that provide evidence of their achievement
  • Are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the school year and at other appropriate points throughout the school year.

The achievement chart outlines four categories of knowledge and skills. They include; knowledge and understanding, thinking, communication and application. Teachers will ensure that student work is assessed and/or evaluated in a balanced manner with respect to the four categories, and that achievement of particular expectations is considered within the appropriate categories. A final grade is recorded for this course, and a credit is granted and recorded for this course if the student’s grade is 50% or higher. The final grade for this course will be determined as follows:

  • Seventy percent of the grade will be based on evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade should reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration should be given to more recent evidence of achievement.
  • Thirty percent of the grade will be based on a final evaluation and administered towards the end of the course.

Accommodations For Students With An IEP In An Online School

All students can succeed. Some students are able, with certain accommodations, to participate in the regular course curriculum and to demonstrate learning independently. Accommodations allow access to the course without any changes to the knowledge and skills the student is expected to demonstrate. The accommodations required to facilitate the student’s learning can be identified by the teacher, but recommendations from a School Board generated Individual Education Plan (IEP) if available can also be consulted. Instruction based on principles of universal design and differentiated instruction focuses on the provision of accommodations to meet the diverse needs of learners.

Examples of accommodations (but not limited to) include:

  • Adjustment and or extension of time required to complete assignments or summative tasks
  • Providing alternative assignments or summative tasks
  • Use of scribes and/or other assistive technologies
  • Simplifying the language of instruction

Resources

Teachers will bring additional resources and teaching materials that provide a rich and diverse learning environment. Units in this course profile make specific reference to the intended textbook for this course but can be substituted for any relevant and approved text.

Reference: Mathematics, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007 (Revised) Ministry of Education of Ontario

Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) Requirements for all course.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Is MAP4C?

MAP4C is a Grade 12 Foundations of College Mathematics course at a College preparation level.

What Are 4C Courses?

4C refers to the Grade level of the courses and the pathway. 4 means it is a grade 12 course and C means it is a college preparation course.

Click here for more information on Course Coding System

What Is The Prerequisite Course For MAP4C?

Prerequisite: MBF3C, Grade 11 Foundations for College Mathematics or MCF3M, Grade 11 Functions and Applications

Click here for more information on Ontario secondary curriculum and their prerequisites

How Long Does It Take To Complete The MAP4C Online Course?

At Ontario Virtual School (OVS) you can complete an online highschool credit courses as quickly as 4 weeks, or take as long as 12 months.

Will My Marks Be Sent Directly To OUAC Or OCAS?

Yes, we can send the marks for your online courses directly to OUACOCAS, your home, and to your day school.

Student & Parent Recommendations

Google Reviews For MAP4C – Grade 12 Foundations For College Mathematics

Ontario Virtual School

Ontario Virtual School4.9Based on 444 reviews

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Cameela james image

Cameela jamesOntario virtual school has provided me with the opportunity to achieve my requirements to enrol into my college. I chose the course MAP4C Mathematics. The teacher I was assigned was very patient and helped me throughout the course. Even with the difference in time zones, I found no issues as Mr. Lu (my teacher) was always ready to help. Also Ontario virtual school provides you an account with good study materials which can be viewed over and over again until the concept is understood. I was a bit afraid while joining as to how the online course would be but I can tell you today with full confidence that it was worth it as I got my certificate with 94% marks. Once again I would like to thank my teacher Mr. Michael Lu and also would like to thank Mr. Farhez who coordinated to provide me the best experience possible. I would gladly suggest my friends, relatives and anyone I know to study here.

Judha image

JudhaMy experience with OVS was very wonderful. I thoroughly enjoyed the course and experienced learning from a wonderful teacher that helped me when I needed it most. My grade 12 math course was well structured and I ended up learning the material well. This org is very good for students picking up credits outside of a typical school. Deadlines are mostly your own with a teacher to help you when you need it. 10/10 Virtual Class Experience.

MAP4C

Foundations for College Mathematics, Grade 12, College Preparation

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Course Title: Foundations for College Mathematics, Grade 12, College Preparation (MAP4C)
Course Name: Foundations for College Mathematics
Course Code: MAP4C
Grade: 12
Course Type: College Preparation
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: MBF3C, Foundations for College Mathematics, Grade 11, College Preparation or MCF3M, Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University / College Preparation
Curriculum Policy Document: Mathematics, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007 (Revised)
Course Developer: Virtual High School
Department: Mathematics
Department Head: André Bergeron, B.Sc., B.Ed., OCT
Development Date: 2012
Most Recent Revision Date: N/A
Tuition Fee (CAD): $579 The fee listed is applicable for Ontario students as well as students outside of Ontario who are Canadian citizens or have a permanent address in Canada. For information on International Student Fees, please refer to International Students in the Registration Information at the top of the Register page.REGISTER – STANDARD

Course Description

This course enables students to extend their knowledge of functions. Students will investigate and apply properties of polynomial, exponential, and trigonometric functions; continue to represent functions numerically, graphically, and algebraically; develop facility in simplifying expressions and solving equations; and solve problems that address applications of algebra, trigonometry, vectors, and geometry. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. This course prepares students for college programs in areas such as business, health sciences, and human services, and for certain skilled trades.

Unit Titles and DescriptionsTime Allocated
TrigonometryIn this unit, we will look at the basics of Trigonometry with the study of triangles. We will consider different methods of determining information about triangles, the lengths of sides and their angles, and develop the skills that will enable us to choose an appropriate strategy based on the information we have.16 hours
MeasurementIn this unit, we will consider the measurement of length, area, and volume. We will consider the different ways of measuring and develop an understanding of their origins. We will tackle one of Mathematics’ most useful tools — optimization — the process of maximizing one quantity given certain restraints in another.16 hours
Data and StatisticsIn this unit, we will gain some vital skills in data management. Perhaps the most important of those is the ability to analyse information, to detect patterns, and to be able to make predictions based on them. We will use tools that will help us process information and develop the skills that will enable us to analyse our findings.18 hours
Graphical ModelsIn this unit, we will examine various means of graphically representing relationships. We will consider different situations and determine the form of graphical representation that would best illustrate the relationship. We will develop the skills to both produce and analyse such graphs.13 hours
Algebraic ModelsIn this unit, we will study ways of representing relationships using algebra. We will again look at a number of different relationships and determine how they might best be described using the language of mathematics. We will use these representations to further study and develop the relationships.18 hours
Financial ApplicationsMathematics becomes a critical life-skill when we apply it to our finances. We will study various financial applications, including annuities and mortgages, and gain the skills that will allow us to make educated and rational choices when faced with some of life’s biggest decisions.16 hours
BudgetingIn this unit, we will bring those skills into the personal budget and look at the cost of living. We will consider savings plans, renting versus owning a home, and maintaining a budget. We will develop skills that everyone will need and use.11 hours
Final Assessment
ExamThe final assessment task is a proctored two-hour exam worth 30% of the student’s final mark2 hours
Total110 hours 

Resources required by the student:

Note: This course is entirely online and does not require or rely on any textbook.

  • A scanner, smart phone camera, or similar device to digitize handwritten or hand-drawn work
  • A non-programmable, non-graphing, scientific calculator
  • Graphing software (e.g. Desmos® graphing calculator) Other links may be provided in the course

Overall Curriculum Expectations

A. Mathematical Models
A1evaluate powers with rational exponents, simplify algebraic expressions involving exponents, and solve problems involving exponential equations graphically and using common bases;
A2describe trends based on the interpretation of graphs, compare graphs using initial conditions and rates of change, and solve problems by modelling relationships graphically and algebraically;
A3make connections between formulas and linear, quadratic, and exponential relations, solve problems using formulas arising from real-world applications, and describe applications of mathematical modelling in various occupations.
B. Personal Finance
B1demonstrate an understanding of annuities, including mortgages, and solve related problems using technology;
B2gather, interpret, and compare information about owning or renting accommodation, and solve problems involving the associated costs;
B3design, justify, and adjust budgets for individuals and families described in case studies, and describe applications of the mathematics of personal finance.
C. Geometry and Trigonometry
C1solve problems involving measurement and geometry and arising from real-world applications;
C2explain the significance of optimal dimensions in real-world applications, and determine optimal dimensions of two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures;
C3solve problems using primary trigonometric ratios of acute and obtuse angles, the sine law, and the cosine law, including problems arising from real-world applications, and describe applications of trigonometry in various occupations.
D. Data Mangement
D1collect, analyse, and summarize two-variable data using a variety of tools and strategies, and interpret and draw conclusions from the data;
D2demonstrate an understanding of the applications of data management used by the media and the advertising industry and in various occupations.

REGISTER – STANDARD

Teaching and Learning Strategies:

The over-riding aim of this course is to help students use the language of mathematics skillfully, confidently, and flexibly. A wide variety of instructional strategies are used to provide learning opportunities to accommodate a variety of learning styles, interests, and ability levels. The following mathematical processes are used throughout the course as strategies for teaching and learning the concepts presented:

  • Problem solving: This course scaffolds learning by providing students with opportunities to review and activate prior knowledge (e.g. reviewing order of operations from prior mathematics courses), and build off of this knowledge to acquire new skills. The course guides students toward recognizing opportunities to apply knowledge they have gained to solve problems.
  • Connecting: This course connects the concepts taught to real-world applications (e.g. concepts taught in personal finance are connected to purchasing a car, budgeting, and home ownership).
  • Representing: Through the use of examples, practice problems, and solution videos, the course models various ways to demonstrate understanding, poses questions that require students to use different representations as they are working at each level of conceptual development – concrete, visual or symbolic, and allows individual students the time they need to solidify their understanding at each conceptual stage.
  • Selecting Tools and Computational Strategies: This course models the use of graphing software to help solve problems and to familiarize students with technologies that can help make solving problems faster and more accurate. Students will also be introduced to software and other Internet resources that can help them to understand and manage their personal finance (e.g. mortgage calculator with an amortization schedule).
  • Self-Assessment: Through the use of interactive activities (e.g. multiple choice quizzes, and drag-and-drop activities) students receive instantaneous feedback and are able to self-assess their understanding of concepts.

Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting Strategies of Student Performance:

Our theory of assessment and evaluation follows the Ministry of Education’s Growing Success document, and it is our firm belief that doing so is in the best interests of students. We seek to design assessment in such a way as to make it possible to gather and show evidence of learning in a variety of ways to gradually release responsibility to the students, and to give multiple and varied opportunities to reflect on learning and receive detailed feedback.

Growing Success articulates the vision the Ministry has for the purpose and structure of assessment and evaluation techniques. There are seven fundamental principles that ensure best practices and procedures of assessment and evaluation by Virtual High School teachers. VHS assessments and evaluations,

  • are fair, transparent, and equitable for all students;
  • support all students, including those with special education needs, those who are learning the language of instruction (English or French), and those who are First Nation, Métis, or Inuit;
  • are carefully planned to relate to the curriculum expectations and learning goals and, as much as possible, to the interests, learning styles and preferences, needs, and experiences of all students;
  • are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the course and at other points throughout the school year or course;
  • are ongoing, varied in nature, and administered over a period of time to provide multiple opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning;
  • provide ongoing descriptive feedback that is clear, specific, meaningful, and timely to support improved learning and achievement;
  • develop students’ self-assessment skills to enable them to assess their own learning, set specific goals, and plan next steps for their learning.

For a full explanation, please refer to Growing Success.

The Final Grade:

The evaluation for this course is based on the student’s achievement of curriculum expectations and the demonstrated skills required for effective learning. The final percentage grade represents the quality of the student’s overall achievement of the expectations for the course and reflects the corresponding level of achievement as described in the achievement chart for the discipline. A credit is granted and recorded for this course if the student’s grade is 50% or higher. The final grade will be determined as follows:

  • 70% of the grade will be based upon evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade will reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration will be given to more recent evidence of achievement.
  • 30% of the grade will be based on final evaluations administered at the end of the course. The final assessment may be a final exam, a final project, or a combination of both an exam and a project.

The Report Card:

Student achievement will be communicated formally to students via an official report card. Report cards are issued at the midterm point in the course, as well as upon completion of the course. Each report card will focus on two distinct, but related aspects of student achievement. First, the achievement of curriculum expectations is reported as a percentage grade. Additionally, the course median is reported as a percentage. The teacher will also provide written comments concerning the student’s strengths, areas for improvement, and next steps. Second, the learning skills are reported as a letter grade, representing one of four levels of accomplishment. The report card also indicates whether an OSSD credit has been earned. Upon completion of a course, VHS will send a copy of the report card back to the student’s home school (if in Ontario) where the course will be added to the ongoing list of courses on the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. The report card will also be sent to the student’s home address.

Program Planning Considerations:

Teachers who are planning a program in this subject will make an effort to take into account considerations for program planning that align with the Ontario Ministry of Education policy and initiatives in a number of important areas.

Planning Programs for Students with Special Education Needs

Program Considerations for English Language Learners

This Virtual High School online course provide a number of strategies to address the needs of ESL/ELD students. This online course must be flexible in order to accommodate the needs of students who require instruction in English as a second language or English literacy development. The Virtual High School teacher considers it to be his or her responsibility to help students develop their ability to use the English language properly. Appropriate accommodations affecting the teaching, learning, and evaluation strategies in this course may be made in order to help students gain proficiency in English, since students taking English as a second language at the secondary level have limited time in which to develop this proficiency. Virtual High School determines the student’s level of proficiency in the English Language upon registration. This information is communicated to the teacher of the course following the registration and the teacher then invokes a number of strategies and resources to support the student in the course. On a larger scale, well written content will aid ESL students in mastering not only the content of this course, but as well, the English language and all of its idiosyncrasies. Virtual High School has created course content to enrich the student’s learning experience. Many occupations in Canada require employees with capabilities in the English language. Enabling students to learn English language skills will contribute to their success in the larger world.

Environmental Education

Healthy Relationships

Equity and Inclusive Education

Financial Literacy Education

Literacy, Mathematical Literacy, and Inquiry Skills

Critical Thinking and Critical Literacy

The Role of the School Library

The Role of Information and Communications Technology

The Ontario Skills Passport: Making Learning Relevant and Building Skills

Education and Career/Life Planning

Cooperative Education and Other Forms of Experiential Learning

Planning Program Pathways and Programs Leading to a Specialist High Skills Major

Health and Safety

Ethics

Course Title: Foundations for College Mathematics, Grade 12, College Preparation (MAP4C)
Course Name: Foundations for College Mathematics
Course Code: MAP4C
Grade: 12
Course Type: College Preparation
Credit Value: 1.0
Prerequisite: MBF3C, Foundations for College Mathematics, Grade 11, College Preparation or MCF3M, Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University / College Preparation
Curriculum Policy Document: Mathematics, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 11 and 12, 2007 (Revised)
Course Developer: Virtual High School
Department: Mathematics
Department Head: André Bergeron, B.Sc., B.Ed., OCT
Development Date: 2012
Most Recent Revision Date: N/A
Tuition Fee (CAD): $579 The fee listed is applicable for Ontario students as well as students outside of Ontario who are Canadian citizens or have a permanent address in Canada. For information on International Student Fees, please refer to International Students in the Registration Information at the top of the Register page.REGISTER – STANDARD

Course Description

This course enables students to extend their knowledge of functions. Students will investigate and apply properties of polynomial, exponential, and trigonometric functions; continue to represent functions numerically, graphically, and algebraically; develop facility in simplifying expressions and solving equations; and solve problems that address applications of algebra, trigonometry, vectors, and geometry. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. This course prepares students for college programs in areas such as business, health sciences, and human services, and for certain skilled trades.

Unit Titles and DescriptionsTime Allocated
TrigonometryIn this unit, we will look at the basics of Trigonometry with the study of triangles. We will consider different methods of determining information about triangles, the lengths of sides and their angles, and develop the skills that will enable us to choose an appropriate strategy based on the information we have.16 hours
MeasurementIn this unit, we will consider the measurement of length, area, and volume. We will consider the different ways of measuring and develop an understanding of their origins. We will tackle one of Mathematics’ most useful tools — optimization — the process of maximizing one quantity given certain restraints in another.16 hours
Data and StatisticsIn this unit, we will gain some vital skills in data management. Perhaps the most important of those is the ability to analyse information, to detect patterns, and to be able to make predictions based on them. We will use tools that will help us process information and develop the skills that will enable us to analyse our findings.18 hours
Graphical ModelsIn this unit, we will examine various means of graphically representing relationships. We will consider different situations and determine the form of graphical representation that would best illustrate the relationship. We will develop the skills to both produce and analyse such graphs.13 hours
Algebraic ModelsIn this unit, we will study ways of representing relationships using algebra. We will again look at a number of different relationships and determine how they might best be described using the language of mathematics. We will use these representations to further study and develop the relationships.18 hours
Financial ApplicationsMathematics becomes a critical life-skill when we apply it to our finances. We will study various financial applications, including annuities and mortgages, and gain the skills that will allow us to make educated and rational choices when faced with some of life’s biggest decisions.16 hours
BudgetingIn this unit, we will bring those skills into the personal budget and look at the cost of living. We will consider savings plans, renting versus owning a home, and maintaining a budget. We will develop skills that everyone will need and use.11 hours
Final Assessment
ExamThe final assessment task is a proctored two-hour exam worth 30% of the student’s final mark2 hours
Total110 hours 

Resources required by the student:

Note: This course is entirely online and does not require or rely on any textbook.

  • A scanner, smart phone camera, or similar device to digitize handwritten or hand-drawn work
  • A non-programmable, non-graphing, scientific calculator
  • Graphing software (e.g. Desmos® graphing calculator) Other links may be provided in the course

Overall Curriculum Expectations

A. Mathematical Models
A1evaluate powers with rational exponents, simplify algebraic expressions involving exponents, and solve problems involving exponential equations graphically and using common bases;
A2describe trends based on the interpretation of graphs, compare graphs using initial conditions and rates of change, and solve problems by modelling relationships graphically and algebraically;
A3make connections between formulas and linear, quadratic, and exponential relations, solve problems using formulas arising from real-world applications, and describe applications of mathematical modelling in various occupations.
B. Personal Finance
B1demonstrate an understanding of annuities, including mortgages, and solve related problems using technology;
B2gather, interpret, and compare information about owning or renting accommodation, and solve problems involving the associated costs;
B3design, justify, and adjust budgets for individuals and families described in case studies, and describe applications of the mathematics of personal finance.
C. Geometry and Trigonometry
C1solve problems involving measurement and geometry and arising from real-world applications;
C2explain the significance of optimal dimensions in real-world applications, and determine optimal dimensions of two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures;
C3solve problems using primary trigonometric ratios of acute and obtuse angles, the sine law, and the cosine law, including problems arising from real-world applications, and describe applications of trigonometry in various occupations.
D. Data Mangement
D1collect, analyse, and summarize two-variable data using a variety of tools and strategies, and interpret and draw conclusions from the data;
D2demonstrate an understanding of the applications of data management used by the media and the advertising industry and in various occupations.

REGISTER – STANDARD

Teaching and Learning Strategies:

The over-riding aim of this course is to help students use the language of mathematics skillfully, confidently, and flexibly. A wide variety of instructional strategies are used to provide learning opportunities to accommodate a variety of learning styles, interests, and ability levels. The following mathematical processes are used throughout the course as strategies for teaching and learning the concepts presented:

  • Problem solving: This course scaffolds learning by providing students with opportunities to review and activate prior knowledge (e.g. reviewing order of operations from prior mathematics courses), and build off of this knowledge to acquire new skills. The course guides students toward recognizing opportunities to apply knowledge they have gained to solve problems.
  • Connecting: This course connects the concepts taught to real-world applications (e.g. concepts taught in personal finance are connected to purchasing a car, budgeting, and home ownership).
  • Representing: Through the use of examples, practice problems, and solution videos, the course models various ways to demonstrate understanding, poses questions that require students to use different representations as they are working at each level of conceptual development – concrete, visual or symbolic, and allows individual students the time they need to solidify their understanding at each conceptual stage.
  • Selecting Tools and Computational Strategies: This course models the use of graphing software to help solve problems and to familiarize students with technologies that can help make solving problems faster and more accurate. Students will also be introduced to software and other Internet resources that can help them to understand and manage their personal finance (e.g. mortgage calculator with an amortization schedule).
  • Self-Assessment: Through the use of interactive activities (e.g. multiple choice quizzes, and drag-and-drop activities) students receive instantaneous feedback and are able to self-assess their understanding of concepts.

Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting Strategies of Student Performance:

Our theory of assessment and evaluation follows the Ministry of Education’s Growing Success document, and it is our firm belief that doing so is in the best interests of students. We seek to design assessment in such a way as to make it possible to gather and show evidence of learning in a variety of ways to gradually release responsibility to the students, and to give multiple and varied opportunities to reflect on learning and receive detailed feedback.

Growing Success articulates the vision the Ministry has for the purpose and structure of assessment and evaluation techniques. There are seven fundamental principles that ensure best practices and procedures of assessment and evaluation by Virtual High School teachers. VHS assessments and evaluations,

  • are fair, transparent, and equitable for all students;
  • support all students, including those with special education needs, those who are learning the language of instruction (English or French), and those who are First Nation, Métis, or Inuit;
  • are carefully planned to relate to the curriculum expectations and learning goals and, as much as possible, to the interests, learning styles and preferences, needs, and experiences of all students;
  • are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the course and at other points throughout the school year or course;
  • are ongoing, varied in nature, and administered over a period of time to provide multiple opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning;
  • provide ongoing descriptive feedback that is clear, specific, meaningful, and timely to support improved learning and achievement;
  • develop students’ self-assessment skills to enable them to assess their own learning, set specific goals, and plan next steps for their learning.

For a full explanation, please refer to Growing Success.

The Final Grade:

The evaluation for this course is based on the student’s achievement of curriculum expectations and the demonstrated skills required for effective learning. The final percentage grade represents the quality of the student’s overall achievement of the expectations for the course and reflects the corresponding level of achievement as described in the achievement chart for the discipline. A credit is granted and recorded for this course if the student’s grade is 50% or higher. The final grade will be determined as follows:

  • 70% of the grade will be based upon evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade will reflect the student’s most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration will be given to more recent evidence of achievement.
  • 30% of the grade will be based on final evaluations administered at the end of the course. The final assessment may be a final exam, a final project, or a combination of both an exam and a project.

The Report Card:

Student achievement will be communicated formally to students via an official report card. Report cards are issued at the midterm point in the course, as well as upon completion of the course. Each report card will focus on two distinct, but related aspects of student achievement. First, the achievement of curriculum expectations is reported as a percentage grade. Additionally, the course median is reported as a percentage. The teacher will also provide written comments concerning the student’s strengths, areas for improvement, and next steps. Second, the learning skills are reported as a letter grade, representing one of four levels of accomplishment. The report card also indicates whether an OSSD credit has been earned. Upon completion of a course, VHS will send a copy of the report card back to the student’s home school (if in Ontario) where the course will be added to the ongoing list of courses on the student’s Ontario Student Transcript. The report card will also be sent to the student’s home address.

Program Planning Considerations:

Teachers who are planning a program in this subject will make an effort to take into account considerations for program planning that align with the Ontario Ministry of Education policy and initiatives in a number of important areas.

MAP4C Foundations for College Mathematics Grade 12 online course

Course description:This course enables you to broaden your understanding of real-world applications of mathematics. You will analyse data using statistical methods; solve problems involving applications of geometry and trigonometry; solve financial problems connected with annuities, budgets, and renting or owning accommodation; simplify expressions; and solve equations. You will reason mathematically and communicate your thinking as you solve multi-step problems. This course prepares you for college programs in areas such as business, health sciences, and human services, and for certain skilled trades.

Course Lessons

This course is designed for independent study.15 Lessons

Unit 1 : Mathematical models3 Lessons

1.1   Exponents