how do i find all my student loans

Last Updated on December 14, 2022 by Omoyeni Adeniyi

To get all the important details you need on student loans gov, student aid, student loan forgiveness and lots more All you have to do is to please keep on reading this post from college learners. Always ensure you come back for all the latest information that you need with zero stress.

How do I find all my student loans?

You can find all your loans in one place. Here’s how:

  1. Log in to [login name] and click on “Loan History”.
  2. Click “View All Loan History” on the left side of the screen. You’ll see a list of all your loans in order of how long ago they were taken out. The most recent loan will be at the top of the list, and each subsequent loan will be underneath it, with more time between each loan listed as “N/A”.
  3. Click on any loan in the list to see more details about it, including whether or not you’ve paid any interest or principal back so far and what your current balance is (the amount left over after all payments have been made).

Students and parents may borrow from the federal government to help pay for college. Federal loans offer some low interest rates and flexible repayment options.

student loans gov

Federal Direct Loan Programs

Federal Direct Loans are available to undergraduate and graduate students attending college at least half time and can be one of the lowest-cost loan options. These loans are not credit based, and nearly all students who file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) are eligible to borrow. Eligibility is dependent on general eligibility for federal financial aid (you do not necessarily have to have financial need), school cost, enrollment, and grade level.

There are two types of Federal Direct Loans available to students:

  • Direct Subsidized Loan is a need-based loan. Interest does not accrue while the student is in school.
  • Direct Unsubsidized Loan is not need-based. Interest does accrue while the student is in school.

Federal Direct PLUS Loan

The Federal Direct PLUS Loan for parents and graduate students is a credit-based loan. Direct PLUS Loans can help pay for expenses not covered by other financial aid.

How Do I Apply for Federal Student Loans?

File the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to apply for ALL federal financial aid, including loans. Need help with your FAFSA? Visit FAME’s Filing the FAFSA page.

For the most up-to-date information regarding federal loan programs, including loan limits and interest rates, visit StudentAid.gov.

Education and Student Loans | Congresswoman Norma Torres

How do I find out information about my student loans?

You can find information about your student loans, including your balance, through the U.S. Department of Education  for federal loans, or through your student loan servicer for private loans.

Federal Student Loans

The definitive source for information on your federal student loans is the U.S. Department of Education’s Federal Student Aid  website. Through this website you can access information about your federal student loans.

Private Student Loans

To find out information on your private student loans, you’ll need to contact each of your private student loan servicers to determine your total loan balance or check your credit report.

Unlike federal student loans, there is not a single website that contains information about all of your private student loans. Your private student loans will not be listed the U.S. Department of Education’s Federal Student Aid  website because the system shows only your federal student loans.

If you do not know what private student loans you might have, request a free credit report at annualcreditreport.com. Private student lenders may report your loans to credit reporting agencies even while you’re still in school or in deferment.

Here are some tips for taking control of your student loans.

student aid

Types of Financial Aid

Financial aid is money to help pay for college or career school. Grants, work-study, loans, and scholarships help make college or career school affordable.

A variety of financial aid sources are available to help you pay for college or career school.

Financial aid can come from federal, state, school, and private sources to help you pay for college or career school.

Besides financial aid, you should also think about what you can do to lower your costs when you go to college.

“Types of Federal Student Aid” Video

Check out this video to learn about federal grants, loans, and work-study jobs and how they can help fund your education.https://www.youtube.com/embed/Pn4OECMTh5wView accessible version (wmv)

Grants

A grant is a form of financial aid that doesn’t have to be repaid (unless, for example, you withdraw from school and owe a refund, or you receive a TEACH Grant and don’t complete your service obligation). A variety of federal grants are available, including Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG), Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grants, and Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grants.

Learn About Grants

Scholarships

Many nonprofit and private organizations offer scholarships to help students pay for college or career school. This type of free money, which is sometimes based on academic merit, talent, or a particular area of study, can make a real difference in helping you manage your education expenses.

Learn About Scholarships

Work-Study Jobs

The Federal Work-Study Program allows you to earn money to pay for school by working part-time.

Learn About Work-Study

Loans

When you receive a student loan, you are borrowing money to attend a college or career school. You must repay the loan as well as interest that accrues. It is important to understand your repayment options so you can successfully repay your loan.

Learn About Loans

Aid for Military Families

There are special aid programs or additional aid eligibility for serving in the military or for being the spouse or child of a veteran.

Learn About Aid for Military Families

Aid for International Study

Federal student aid may be available for studying at a school outside the United States, whether you’re studying abroad or getting your degree from an international school.

Learn About Aid for International Study

Aid and Other Resources From the Federal Government

Besides aid from the U.S. Department of Education (ED), the federal government offers a number of other financial aid programs. These programs include

Federal student aid from ED covers such expenses as tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, and transportation. Aid can also help pay for other related expenses, such as a computer and dependent care. Thousands of schools across the country participate in the federal student aid programs; ask the schools you’re interested in whether they do!

Apply for federal student aid—grantswork-study, and loans—using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form. And remember, the first F in “FAFSA” stands for “free”—you shouldn’t pay to fill out the FAFSA form!

You can estimate your eligibility for federal student aid and your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) with our Federal Student Aid Estimator. Be sure to use the tool before you fill out the FAFSA form.

Aid From Your State Government

Other than federal aid, you might be eligible for financial assistance from your state. Contact your state grant agency for more information.

Aid From Your College or Career School

Many schools offer financial aid from their own grant and/or scholarship funds. Find out what might be available to you:

  • Visit your school’s financial aid page on its website, or contact the financial aid office.
  • Ask at the department that offers your course of study; they might have a scholarship for students in your major.
  • Fill out any applications your school requires for its own aid programs, and meet your school’s deadlines.

student loan forgiveness

Do You Qualify for Student Loan Forgiveness or Discharge?

Federal student loans offer benefits that many other loans don’t. One benefit is the ability to qualify for loan forgiveness—under special circumstances, the federal government may forgive part, or all, of your federal student loans. This means you’re no longer obligated to make your loan payments. Another benefit is there may be some situations where you may qualify to have your loans discharged.

These are some of the most common types of loan forgiveness and discharge.

  • Public Service Loan Forgiveness (and Temporary Expanded Public Service Loan Forgiveness)
  • Teacher Loan Forgiveness
  • Closed School Discharge
  • Total and Permanent Disability Discharge

Note this is not a complete list , and you need to meet certain requirements and provide specific information to qualify. See if you qualify.

Teacher Loan Forgiveness

If you teach full-time for five complete and consecutive academic years in a low-income elementary school, secondary school, or educational service agency, you may be eligible for forgiveness of up to $17,500 on your Direct Loan program loans. See StudentAid.gov/teach-forgive  for more information and a form you can fill out when you have completed your teaching service.

Learn more about the Teacher Loan Forgiveness program, eligibility requirements, and how to apply. (If you aren’t already logged in, you’ll be asked to do so.)

Note: You may not receive a benefit for the same qualifying payments or period of service for Teacher Loan Forgiveness and Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF)

Learn about Federal Student Aid’s limited-time waiver for the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program. Act soon — the waiver ends October 31, 2022.

If you are employed by a government or not-for-profit organization, you may be able to receive loan forgiveness under the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program.

The PSLF Program forgives the remaining balance on your Direct Loans* after you have made 120 qualifying monthly payments under a qualifying repayment plan while working full-time for a qualifying employer.

Complete the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Form With the PSLF Help Tool

The PSLF Help Tool  helps determine whether you work for a qualifying employer for the PSLF or Temporary Expanded Public Service Loan Forgiveness (TEPSLF) programs, suggests actions you can take to become eligible for PSLF, and guides you through the PSLF form and submission process.

Important Limited PSLF Waiver

On October 6, 2021, the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid (FSA) announced a temporary period during which borrowers may receive credit for payments that previously did not qualify for PSLF or TEPSLF. This change will apply to student loan borrowers with Direct Loans, those who have already consolidated into the Direct Loan Program, and those who consolidate into the Direct Loan Program by October 31, 2022. For more information on the limited PSLF waiver, visit Studentaid.gov/pslfwaiver .

Key Points: Summary of Changes Under the Limited PSLF Waiver

  • For a limited time, you may receive credit for past periods of repayment on loans that would otherwise not qualify for PSLF.
  • For a limited time, you can receive forgiveness even if not employed by a qualifying employer at the time of application and forgiveness.
  • If you have Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL), Perkins, or other federal student loans, you’ll need to consolidate them into a Direct Consolidation Loan to qualify for PSLF both in general and under the waiver (and to receive qualifying credit for previous payments made on those loans through the limited PSLF waiver, you’ll need to receive or apply for a Direct Consolidation Loan  on or before October 31, 2022). Before consolidating, make sure to check to see if you work for a qualifying employer.
  • Past periods of repayment will now count regardless of repayment plan, whether the payment was made in full or on time, and whether the payment was made prior to consolidation.
  • Periods of deferment or forbearance, and periods of default, continue not to qualify.
    • If you have loans that were in forbearance during the COVID-19 payment pause from March 2020 through April 2022, or loans that were in specific military-related deferment, you can receive qualifying payment credit (as long as you were employed with a qualifying employer).

Note: The qualifying employment requirement has not changed.

Learn more about how this limited PSLF waiver may impact your loans. Act soon — the waiver ends October 31, 2022. You can also contact us with questions.

Note: Servicing for the PSLF program is managed by another federal student loan servicer (FedLoan Servicing ). If you enroll in PSLF, your eligible loans will be transferred from Great Lakes to that servicer. If your loans have already been transferred to FedLoan Servicing, you can log in to their borrower portal to track your PSLF payment counts.

Also note, if you received Teacher Loan Forgiveness, under the limited PSLF waiver, the period of service that led to your eligibility will count toward PSLF (if you certify employment for PSLF for that period).

* Any loan received under the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program qualifies for PSLF.

Loans from these federal student loan programs don’t qualify for PSLF: the Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program and the Federal Perkins Loan (Perkins Loan) Program. However, they may become eligible if you consolidate them into a Direct Consolidation Loan.

Student loans from private lenders do not qualify for PSLF.

Under normal PSLF Program rules, if you consolidate your loans, only qualifying payments that you make on the new Direct Consolidation Loan can be counted toward the 120 payments required for PSLF. Any payments you made on the loans before you consolidated them don’t count. However, if you consolidate these loans into a Direct Loan before October 31, 2022, you may be able to receive qualifying credit for payments made on those loans through the limited PSLF waiver. Learn more .

FSA’s PSLF Help Tool  will tell you whether you need to consolidate some or all of your loans. back

You’ve Got Options If You Were Denied PSLF

If your application for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) was denied, you may be able to receive loan forgiveness under the Temporary Expanded Public Service Loan Forgiveness (TEPSLF) opportunity.

As part of this opportunity, the Department of Education reconsiders your eligibility using an expanded list of qualifying repayment plans.

Important Limited PSLF Waiver

On October 6, 2021, the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid (FSA) announced a temporary period during which borrowers may receive credit for payments that previously did not qualify for PSLF or TEPSLF. This change will apply to student loan borrowers with Direct Loans, those who have already consolidated into the Direct Loan Program, and those who consolidate into the Direct Loan Program by October 31, 2022.

Learn more about how this limited PSLF waiver may impact your loans. Act soon — the waiver ends October 31, 2022. You can also contact us with questions.

This TEPSLF opportunity is temporary, has limited funding, and will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Once all of the funds are used, the TEPSLF opportunity will end.

Visit StudentAid.gov  for detailed information on how to be reconsidered for loan forgiveness.

Closed School Discharge

If your school closes while you’re enrolled or soon after you withdraw, you may be eligible for a discharge of your federal student loan. For example, ITT and Corinthian College recently closed and qualified students were eligible for loan discharge. Learn more about the process, eligibility requirements , and how you can apply.

Borrower Defense to Repayment

If you believe that the school you attended misled you or engaged in misconduct in violation of certain laws, the federal student loans you obtained to attend that school may be eligible for forgiveness, called Borrower Defense to RepaymentLearn more about the process, eligibility requirements and how you can apply .

Total and Permanent Disability Discharge

Learn more about the Total and Permanent Disability Discharge process , eligibility requirements, and how to apply.

Note: Servicing for this process is managed by another federal student loan servicer. If you apply for a Total and Permanent Disability Discharge, your eligible loans will be transferred from Great Lakes to that servicer.

Not Eligible for Total and Permanent Disability?

If you believe you qualify for one of the programs other than the Total and Permanent Disability Discharge, complete and submit a loan forgiveness, cancellation, or discharge application form. (If you aren’t already logged in, you’ll be asked to do so.)

All forms are in Portable Document Format (PDF). In order to view PDF files, you must first download the free Acrobat Reader software. Detailed instructions for downloading and installing the Acrobat Reader are located on the 

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Should I Apply for Student Loan Forgiveness? | RamseySolutions.com

In conclusion, if you want to find all your student loans, it is possible to do so. You can go through the process of finding them yourself or hire someone to help you find them. You should start by contacting the school or school district where you attended and request that they provide you with a copy of your transcripts. From there, you will also need to contact your loan servicers and request copies of all your loan documents. If you are unable to get these documents from your loan servicers, then they may not have been able to locate them either.

If you are still unable to locate any documentation regarding your loans after this point, then it may be time for you to consider hiring an attorney who specializes in consumer law cases like this one. The attorney will be able to assist in locating where these loans were taken out so that they can be repaid on behalf of the consumer who is responsible for paying them off but does not know where those payments need to go or how much money has already been paid off on each individual loan.

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