Medical Anthropology PhD Europe

Last Updated on August 30, 2022 by Alvina Ibe

Is medical anthropology phd in europe on your radar? Would you like to gain admission or apply for medical anthropology in eurpe? If so, this article will help! This article will provide you with the most up-to-date information about doctorate programs in europe for medical anthropology

Read on for more information on medical anthropology phd europe, phd anthropology europe,phd medical anthropology,medical anthropology master’s europe, and many related topics on CollegeLearner.

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Medical anthropology studies “human health and disease, health care systems, and biocultural adaptation”.It views humans from multidimensional and ecological perspectives. It is one of the most highly developed areas of anthropology and applied anthropology, and is a subfield of social and cultural anthropology that examines the ways in which culture and society are organized around or influenced by issues of health, health care and related issues.

The term “medical anthropology” has been used since 1963 as a label for empirical research and theoretical production by anthropologists into the social processes and cultural representations of health, illness and the nursing/care practices associated with these.

Furthermore, in Europe the terms “anthropology of medicine”, “anthropology of health” and “anthropology of illness” have also been used, and “medical anthropology”, was also a translation of the 19th century Dutch term “medische anthropology

In the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Brazil, collaboration between anthropology and medicine was initially concerned with implementing community health programs among ethnic and cultural minorities and with the qualitative and ethnographic evaluation of health institutions (hospitals and mental hospitals) and primary care services. Regarding the community health programs, the intention was to resolve the problems of establishing these services for a complex mosaic of ethnic groups. The ethnographic evaluation involved analyzing the interclass conflicts within the institutions which had an undesirable effect on their administrative reorganization and their institutional objectives, particularly those conflicts among the doctors, nurses, auxiliary staff and administrative staff. The ethnographic reports show that interclass crises directly affected therapeutic criteria and care of the ill. They also contributed new methodological criteria for evaluating the new institutions resulting from the reforms as well as experimental care techniques such as therapeutic communities.

The ethnographic evidence supported the criticisms of the institutional custodialism and contributed decisively to policies of deinstitutionalizing psychiatric and social care in general and led to in some countries such as Italy, a rethink of the guidelines on education and promoting health.

The empirical answers to these questions led to the anthropologists being involved in many areas. These include: developing international and community health programs in developing countries; evaluating the influence of social and cultural variables in the epidemiology of certain forms of psychiatric pathology (transcultural psychiatry); studying cultural resistance to innovation in therapeutic and care practices; analysing healing practices toward immigrants; and studying traditional healers, folk healers and empirical midwives who may be reinvented as health workers (the so-called barefoot doctors).

Also, since the 1960s, biomedicine in developed countries has been faced by a series of problems which stipulate inspection of predisposing social or cultural factors, which have been reduced to variables in quantitative protocols and subordinated to causal biological or genetic interpretations. Among these the following are of particular note:

a) The transition between a dominant system designed for acute infectious pathology to a system designed for chronic degenerative pathology without any specific etiological therapy.

b) The emergence of the need to develop long term treatment mechanisms and strategies, as opposed to incisive therapeutic treatments.

c) The influence of concepts such as quality of life in relation to classic biomedical therapeutic criteria.

Added to these are the problems associated with implementing community health mechanisms. These problems are perceived initially as tools for fighting against unequal access to health services. However, once a comprehensive service is available to the public, new problems emerge from ethnic, cultural or religious differences, or from differences between age groups, genders or social classes.

If implementing community care mechanisms gives rise to one set of problems, then a whole new set of problems also arises when these same mechanisms are dismantled and the responsibilities which they once assumed are placed back on the shoulders of individual members of society.

In all these fields, local and qualitative ethnographic research is indispensable for understanding the way patients and their social networks incorporate knowledge on health and illness when their experience is nuanced by complex cultural influences. These influences result from the nature of social relations in advanced societies and from the influence of social communication media, especially audiovisual media and advertising.

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Best 10 Medical Anthropology In Europe

1. Karolinska Institute, Sweden 

Located in Solna, right next to Sweden’s capital, Stockholm, Karolinska Institute is one of the most prestigious medical institutions in the world. With an affiliated teaching and research hospital, Karolinska is a place where a lot of focus isn’t just on the theoretical side, but on innovation and on practice, as well.

2. Heidelberg University, Germany

Heidelberg University has a rich history in Germany and Europe. As the oldest university in the country, and the third ever university established by the Roman Empire, the university is home to a lot of international students, coming from over 130 countries.

3. ETH Zurich, Switzerland 

ETH Zurich – Swiss Federal Institute of Technology was founded over 150 years ago and has established itself as one of the most important institutions in STEM research. As one of the most important and highly-ranked universities in the world, not just in Europe, a degree at ETH is definitively something that will make your CV stand out.

4. Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany

Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin stands out among other German universities thanks to its research efforts. Over 3,700 researchers are working on new medical innovations and devices. You can be one of them!

5. LMU Munich, Germany 

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) Munich has a centuries-old tradition and is one of the most internationally renowned universities in Germany. Research Services support researchers during all phases of research from consultation on third-party funding to the administrative, and legal aspects of projects.

6. KU Leuven – University of Leuven, Belgium

The Faculty of Medicine is involved in international projects and networks and is part of the Biomedical Sciences Group. Also collaborating with a hospital, the school usually has a consistent group of international students. Research is also a main focus of the specialists from KU Leuven and there are plenty of studies on science, technology and health.

6. Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands

The Erasmus University Rotterdam is often present in the global university rankings created by Times Higher Education, TopUniversities, US News, and other organisations. This is excellent proof of the university’s quality, assets, and its research efforts & facilities.

7. Sorbonne University, France

Sorbonne University is one of the oldest and most prestigious universities in France and in Europe. It is known for its multidisciplinary focus and promoting diversity, creativity and innovation. A lot of the world’s high-level research in science and technology, medicine and human sciences takes place at this university.

8. University of Paris, France

University of Paris spans about twenty campuses and research sites and offers students innovative courses, with ambitious goals and a diverse study offer. The aim of the university is to challenge student development and enact societal change.

9. Maastricht University, Netherlands

Maastricht University teaches using the method of problem-based learning, gathering students from all over the world in interactive classes and building a scientificlly-focused mindsets. The university condusct meaningful research on modern-day hot topics, including new methods to create plastic from organic materials, global warming, migration, and more. 

10. University of Zurich, Switzerland

The University of Zurich is the largest university in Switzerland, preparing students for successful careers through implementing new techniques, models and methods based on real-life examples. The university keeps in touch with international education trends, making sure their classes are at the forefront of academic excellence.  

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