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Clemson University Automotive Engineering Requirements

Last Updated on January 15, 2023 by Team College Learners

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About Clemson University Application Deadline

Have you ever wondered why it gets easier to balance a bicycle the faster you are traveling? Or why there are dimples on a golf ball? Or whether harvesting wind energy changes the environmental balance? If the answer is “yes,” then perhaps you should consider majoring in mechanical engineering. Here, your curiosity and inventiveness will soar as you learn to look deeper into the behavior, design and production of things we use every day. With a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering from Clemson, you will be able to apply engineering analysis and design to matters that affect our everyday lives such as manufacturing; energy conversion and conservation; machines; materials; health; and vehicles for air, sea and land transportation. Because science and technology are ever changing, our program focuses on fundamental principles as well as modern tools. You will develop a foundation on which to embark on a path of lifelong learning as you practice mechanical engineering; earn advanced degrees; or go on to practice law, business or medicine.

Automotive Engineering Archives - CU-ICAR: Clemson University International  Center for Automotive Research CU-ICAR: Clemson University International  Center for Automotive Research

FAST FACTS
The demand for mechanical engineers is very high, and interest in our program reflects that trend.
Our faculty members are internationally recognized in education and research.
More than 70 percent of our students have participated in a co-op and/or internship, according to our latest senior exit survey.
Our faculty has degrees from top institutions worldwide and significant experience in industry or national labs. Many are fellows in professional engineering societies.
With our B.S./M.S. program, you can earn up to a semester’s credit toward a graduate degree while simultaneously satisfying requirements for your undergraduate degree.
All students planning to choose a degree in an engineering discipline will apply to Clemson as a general engineering major.
WHAT YOU’LL STUDY
Freshmen who major in engineering at Clemson are initially admitted into our general engineering program, where you will learn math and science fundamentals, problem solving methods and modern analytical tools, all of which are common to all engineering disciplines. During freshman year, you will make a decision as to which discipline you will enter. Mechanical engineering has a minimum GPR requirement for admission.

Studying mechanical engineering prepares you in the basic sciences and math, thermal and fluid science, and mechanical systems. As classes progress, you will develop your analytical, design and experimental abilities, which will prepare you for the challenges and questions you will face in your career. Seniors choose from our technical electives classes, providing chances to focus on your interests or obtain a broader view of many mechanical engineering topics. Seniors also collaborate with classmates to solve a real-world problem supplied by an industry partner.

Research in our department encompasses experimental, analytical and computational work in the following areas:

Advanced Manufacturing
Bioengineering and Biomaterials
Design
Dynamics and Controls
Energy Systems
Fluid Mechanics
Materials and Materials Processing
Solid Mechanics
Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer and Combustion
Transportation Vehicles and Systems

Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Program: Get a jump-start on your Master of Science in mechanical engineering while completing your bachelor’s. In our combined-degree program you can apply up to 12 credit hours toward your graduate degree while simultaneously satisfying your technical elective

Information for Current Students

Academic Calendar+
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For important dates and deadlines, please view the Clemson University Academic Calendars

Assistantship Opportunities+
For assistantship opportunities, whether RA or TA, please do not approach faculty unwarranted with requests. When the time comes, and if there is a position available, an announcement will be made by the professor or the department.

Undergraduate Certificate in Automotive Engineering | College of Engineering,  Computing and Applied Sciences | Clemson University, South Carolina

As a general rule, assistantships in Automotive Engineering are given to Ph.D. students, and rarely to M.S. students.

Career Workshops+
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For training, workshop, and job fair opportunities, please visit the Center for Career and Professional Development – Michelin Career Center.

Occasionally, AUE will host the Michelin Career Center for different workshops and seminars. Those will be announced by the department.

Class Registration Best Practices+
Download the following presentation for more information regarding class registration best practices.
Class Registartion Best Practices Presentation
Class Schedule/Offerings+
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If you have issues with class offerings (or lack thereof) or class timings, the below steps should be taken in incremental order. If these steps are not taken, faculty and staff cannot get a grasp of what is truly a need, or what is a frivolous desire. At the end of the day, class offerings are not guaranteed, and class schedules are not guaranteed to move in order to fit with your personal schedule, although large problems can possibly be addressed if these steps are followed.

Things to Keep in Mind When Addressing Class Schedule/Offerings Issues:
There is strength in numbers. A lot of students with the same problem have a greater chance of changing something than just one student with a random issue. However, that does not mean to start a petition without guidance.
Approach people listed in the steps below with possible solutions and ideas, not just complaints.
Whatever decision is made, even if it goes against what you were trying to get, you must live with it. There are many factors that go into a class schedule, some of which include faculty availability, room size, fire code, VTC capability, other course offerings, etc. It is not as easy to change something as it may seem on paper.
Problem Severity Incremental Steps to Take
High As a very last resort, and only if you have discussed with appropriate AUE staff, approach the faculty member of the course with the issue.
Medium Try and get a rough number of students with the issue. Then take it to the Student Services Coordinator, who can run it by the necessary faculty and GRC.
Low Discuss with other students. If a large group has the same issue, then proceed. If you’re the only one with the issue, not much can be done. *If you are the only one facing an issue, you are welcomed to still talk to the Student Services Coordinator and see what can be done, it’s just that wholesale changes are not likely.
CPT/OPT Issues and Concerns+
When an international student receives a job/internship relating to their studies, it becomes necessary to fill out the CPT paperwork. Numerous questions can arise regarding the CPT approval process, forms, and iStart Portal items.

Problem Severity Incremental Steps to Take
High Complex, time sensitive, and the most important issues should be asked to the Office of Global Engagement Office. Contact Taylor Rigot in person at CU-ICAR or email [email protected]
Medium More in-depth, but still relatively common CPT/OPT questions can be asked to the Student Services Coordinator
Low For small generic problems, talk to your academic advisor. They can assist on very common CPT/OPT questions
Graduating students wishing to apply for OPT should start the process at least 60 days before graduation. To get the process started, or to have questions answered, email International Services at [email protected]

Department Staff Contacts+
The Department of Automotive Engineering’s staff members are eager to help students with questions, concerns, and projects. To make things easier, we have compiled a list of the most common issues that students need help with and listed the appropriate staff contact.

The list includes both tasks performed by administrative and lab staff.

Please click the staff member’s name to send an e-mail. Often, an e-mail is the best way to make contact. If a room and/or phone number are listed, you may also use these to make contact.

For a full listing of staff members, please visit the faculty and staff page.

I NEED HELP WITH… CONTACT/RESOURCE
Access to Campbell Center (CGEC) Jim Potter (backup David Mann 864-283-7206 or CGEC Room 109)
Assistantship paperwork (after the assistantship is awarded) After student has established an assistantship with a faculty member, then paperwork is completed by Jeremiah Farmer 864-283-7230 or CGEC Room 322
Automotive Engineering labs at CMI (Greenville Tech) Jim Potter (Lab & Operations Coordinator) 864-283-7205 or CGEC Room 109
Chassis dyno time or information Jim Potter (864-283-7213 or CGEC Room 323)
Computer problems Submit a help ticket by emailing [email protected] with “CES ICAR Greenville” in the subject line. Describe the problem in the body of the email.
Dimensioning Gary Mathis (864-283-7207 or CGEC Room 109)
Employment verification (students employed by Clemson) All requests for student employment verification should go to Tammy Cullen (864-656-2427). The employer, creditor, or rental office seeking this information should make contact with Tammy directly.
Enrollment verification Done through iRoar (see instructions through Clemson’s Registrar’s office here)
Engine dyno cell time or information Jim Potter (864-283-7213 or CGEC Room 323)
Engineering testing, measurements, or instrumentation support Jim Potter (864-283-7213 or CGEC Room 323)
Facilities – general questions Jim Potter (for the Campbell Center and CMI only) 864-283-7205 or CGEC Room 109
Filing my IS-125 and IS-130 before starting my internship The forms can be downloaded here. To complete the process to receive CPT approval, international students must make an appointment with Clemson’s International Services office by e-mailing [email protected] or calling 864-656-3614.
Freight elevator access David Mann (864-283-7206 or CGEC Room 109)
General automotive information or suppliers David Mann (864-283-7206 or CGEC Room 109)
General lab information
Jim Potter (864-283-7213 or CGEC Room 323)

Electronics and Automation - Vocational School - İstanbul Okan Üniversitesi

Secondary contacts for lab information:

Environmental Chamber: Jeremy Barnes / 864-283-7118
Shaker Lab: Jeremy Barnes / 864-283-7118
FEV Engine Dyno: David Mann / 864-283-7206
Chassis Dyno: David Mann / 864-283-7206
Anechoic Chamber: David Mann / 864-283-7206
Powertrain Lab: Jeremy Barnes / 864-283-7118
ETS Electromagnetic Chamber: Jeremy Barnes / 864-283-7118
Graduate School forms and procedures

See the “Forms” page on Clemson’s Graduate School’s website here
Internships After reviewing the internship page, students should contact Jeremiah Farmer for assistance
IT problems Submit a help ticket by emailing [email protected] with “CES ICAR Greenville” in the subject line. Describe the problem in the body of the email.
Labs and CGEC Level 1 facilities Jim Potter (864-283-7213 or CGEC Room 323)
Logo downloads See our Resources page
Machine Shop Gary Mathis (864-283-7207 or CGEC Room 109)
Machining Gary Mathis (864-283-7207 or CGEC Room 109)
Payroll for new student employees
Brittany Burgess (864-283-7215 or CGEC Room 334)

PowerPoint templates See our Resources page
Reserving a conference room Kay Faith (864-283-7220 or CGEC Room 331)
Rules and procedures for the department Refer to the Graduate Student Manual
Safety and security concerns Jim Potter / Allied Security: 864-483-5434
Scheduling an appointment with Dr. Filipi Kay Faith (864-283-7220 or CGEC Room 331)
Test cell coordination, operation and usage Jim Potter (864-283-7213 or CGEC Room 323)
Tolerences (technical) Gary Mathis (864-283-7207 or CGEC Room 109)
Transportation – Greenlink Tiger Commute information

Tuition and fees
Clemson Student Financial Services

Questions? Contact financial services (information here)

Welding Gary Mathis (864-283-7207 or CGEC Room 109)
Employment Resources+
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Automotive engineering students are encouraged to take advantage of the services offered through the Michelin Career Center. In addition to helping with a job or internship search, the Michelin Career Center can help you identify your ideal career path through assessments and one-on-one advising. To schedule an appointment, call 864-656-0440.

Students can also download the Graduate Student Career Plan (PDF) developed by the career center.

RELATED LINKS
ClemsonJobLink
ClemsonJobLink is a job site that allows students and recent alumni to connect with employers.

Graduate Student Resources
Compiled by the Michelin Career Center, this page features a number of employment sites, many with special interest for graduate students.

ASME Career Center*
American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) job listings

Auto Industry Central*
Visitors can search for automotive industry jobs including those in engineering and management.

Engineer Jobs*
Jobs on this site are listed by engineering discipline.

IEEE Job Boards*
Engineering and technology jobs posted on the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers or IEEE site

MT Careers*
The only manufacuturing industry-specific job board.

Postdoc Jobs*
Postdoc Jobs is the first online recruiting service for the postdoc community.

SAE Career Center*
This site is designed to link job seekers with employers in the mobility industry.

*These sites are not affiliated with Clemson University or the Department of Automotive Research. This listing is meant only as a reference; Clemson has no control over the content of these sites or the services offered.

Forms+
All Students
Student Data Sheet
Waiver Request Form

Assistantship Students
GS2000 Graduate Assistant Tuition Remission Form

F-1 Visa Students
Form IS-120: Request to Amend I-20
Form IS-125: Request for Reduced Course Load
Form IS-130: Request for Curricular Practical Training (CPT) Authorization
Form IS-140: Request for Post-Completion Optional Practical Training (OPT)

Internships
Employer Evaluation of Student
Student Evaluation of Internship

Graduating Students
GS4: Online Diploma Application – No longer used. See Grad School’s list of frequently used forms.
GS5D: Results of the Doctoral Comprehensive Exam and Candidacy Form
GS7M: For master’s degree students, Final Exam and Thesis Approval Form
GS7D: For doctoral degree students, Dissertation Defense and Approval Form

Can’t find what you are looking for? Try the Grad School’s list of frequently used forms.

Grades+
Issues with the grade you received should be taken up with the instructor first. It is the policy of Clemson University that students cannot appeal grades, although you may file an official grievance under certain circumstances (you may not file a grievance for a faculty member’s use of a particular grading system) with the Academic Grievance Policy. Note that staff members do not have input on what your grade, or GPA should be.

Problem Severity Incremental Steps to Take
High If you have discussed with the Student Services Coordinator and the Graduate Program Coordinator, and they have confirmed the possibility of an Academic Grievance, you may file one
Medium If you believe an Academic Grievance may have been committed, discuss with Student Services Coordinator, and Dr. Beshah Ayalew, our Graduate Program Coordinator
Low Talk to your instructor about your grade
Graduate Student Manual+
The Graduate Student Manual details curriculum and graduation requirements and other policies that govern students within the automotive engineering program. DOWNLOAD GRADUATE STUDENT MANUAL

Graduation Items+
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There are numerous things you must do as you near graduation – apply to graduate, complete your final GS2, defend and submit the GS7 if you are a Ph.D. student and more. Here are some helpful things to make it go much smoother.

Problem Severity Incremental Steps to Take
High For specific questions regarding forms, deadlines, etc. email Eartha White in Enrolled Student Services
Medium For more in depth, but common questions, discuss with the Student Services Coordinator
Low For generic questions, such as deadlines and procedures, check the Clemson Graduation Deadlines page.
Helpful links
Common graduation related forms. GRAD SCHOOL FORMS/APPLICATIONS
OPT application questions and instructions. See the CPT/OPT dropdown.
Ordering graduation supplies such as cap and gown, or Ph.D. hood. GRADUATION SUPPLIES
GS2 – How To Do It+
Download the following presentation for instructions on completing your GS2.
GS2 Presentation Download
Health Insurance Questions+
Health insurance is a complex issue, that often changes rapidly, and sometimes without notice. In order to deal with that, any questions regarding insurance payments, waivers, refunds, options, etc. should be dealt with via Clemson’s own health insurance materials and contacts.

Problem Severity Incremental Steps to Take
High Email specific staff
Insurance: Vickie Metz & Cassie Mangum
Health Info: Priscilla Bryson
Admin Support: Kimberly Coker
Medium Email [email protected], their generic email that can get routed to the right person
Low Browse the Clemson Insurance and Billing Page or the provided material for our department, to see if the answer can be found there
How to Fill Out Your Time Sheet+
WATCH VIDEO TUTORIAL
Internship Opportunities+
For questions/concerns regarding internship opportunities, availability, and applications, follow the process below:

Problem Severity Incremental Steps to Take
High As a last resort you may reach out to the industry contact, if Cassi has provided it to you and the company has confirmed that it’s okay.
Medium For questions/concerns about whether the internship will count, is long enough, etc., discuss with your academic advisor.
Low For generic questions about opportunities and openings, discuss with the Student Engagement Coordinator, Cassi Bowen ([email protected]).
Office Map+
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Payroll Issues as a Student Employee+
Many students are employed by the department or professors, either as hourly workers or as Graduate Assistants. If you run into any questions with your pay, here’s how you can handle it.

Problem Severity Incremental Steps to Take
High Depending on Brittany’s response, and what the root cause of the issue is, you may need to discuss with your supervisor.
Low Talk to the AUE Accountant Brittany Burgess (Suite 334, [email protected]) as more times than not, she can answer your question on the spot.
Registration Issues/Overrides+
These are common during peak registration times in the fall (for the spring semester) and the spring and summer (for the fall semester). Depending on what your issue is in iRoar, here’s how you handle it:

Questions about registration timings, best practices, what to expect?
Consult our Registration Best Practices material
Facing a registration error?
Email the Student Services Coordinator with the following. Emailing these items will tremendously speed up the amount of time it takes to override the error.
Screenshot of the error you are facing on iRoar
Your CUID
The CRN of the course you are trying to register for
iRoar not functioning properly or having technical issues?
o Submit a help ticket to [email protected] and describe what is happening
Research and Library Resources+
You can visit here to find information on how to request books, search for articles and contact our dedicated librarian for assistance.

Student Bill Questions+
Questions often arise about deadlines, payment plans, specific charges on bills, refunds, as well as fellowship and assistantship coverage and/or fees.

Problem Severity Incremental Steps to Take
High For bill questions, email [email protected]
For loan, fellowship, scholarship, or assistantship items, email [email protected]
Medium If the question/issue persists after 24 hours, email a screenshot of your bill to the Student Services Coordinator ([email protected]). AUE Staff do not have access to your bill on their own.
Low Give it 24 hours and then check your bill again.
Student Cubicle Assignments+
VIEW STUDENT CUBICLE ASSIGNMENT SPREADSHEET
Student Involvement Opportunities+
CU-ICAR Student Association
The CU-ICAR Student Association is made up of the Masters and Ph.D. students enrolled in the automotive and mechanical engineering Programs. The association’s mission is to promote professional development, social interaction and program growth through social events, seminars, tutoring, and projects. This group has attended several professional conferences and held auto events to attract local enthusiasts. You can also find the CU-ICAR Student Association on Facebook.

Baja SAE (Undergraduate)
Clemson Baja SAE is a non-profit organization that allows students to apply the knowledge acquired in the classroom to a real-world setting. Baja SAE is a collegiate design competition sponsored by the Society of Automotive Engineers. Teams from universities around the world compete in an off-road challenge. Student members work together in order to design, build, test, promote, and race a rugged, single seat, off-road vehicle.

Formula SAE (Undergraduate)
Clemson University Formula SAE (CUFSAE) is a student organization dedicated enriching students by allowing them to apply what they have learned in class. From engineering to marketing, computer programming to graphic design, CUFSAE offers something for every student. The group aims to provide students with the tools to learn as much as possible while exploring the possibilities of employment in the automotive industry.

National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE)
With nearly 30,000 members, the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) one of the largest student-governed organizations in the US. Founded in 1975, the NSBE’s mission is to “increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally, and positively impact the community.”

Society of Automotive Engineers Student Chapter (SAE)
The Society of Automotive Engineers at Clemson University offers its members the opportunity to apply their engineering skills to hands-on automotive projects. SAE is an international organization created to share knowledge between students and engineers. The Clemson chapter’s activities include monthly meetings, plant tours, and two design projects — Formula SAE and Mini Baja.

Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE)
SHPE is a national organization of professional engineers who serve as role models in the Hispanic community. The concept of Networking is the key basis for the organization. SHPE’s mission is to change lives by empowering the Hispanic community to realize their fullest potential and impact the world through STEM awareness, access, support, and development. SHPE’s vision is a world where Hispanics are highly valued and influential as the leading innovators, scientists, mathematicians, and engineers.

Society of Women Engineers (SWE)
Clemson University’s chapter of SWE is devoted to encouraging women to achieve their full potential in careers as engineers and leaders. This includes expanding the image of the engineering profession as a positive force in improving the quality of life and demonstrating the value of diversity in the profession.

Student Mail+
As a general rule, students should not have packages addressed to themselves delivered to the Campbell Graduate Engineering Center (i.e. magazines, subscriptions, important bills, etc.), but rather have them sent to their home personal address. While students working under a professor are welcome to have items that relate to the research delivered here, general mail should go to their home.

Inevitably, we do have several things that students may or may not have signed up for that come addressed to them in the form of mail here. Sometimes, if our student workers recognize the recipient as having a cubicle, they will put the mail on that desk. However, that is not to be expected. Mail addressed to students is put in the Student Mail Tray, which is located on the 3rd floor, near Office 329, in our cubby/mail center. Mail addressed to students will be left there for 1 month, before it is discarded. Students are encouraged to come up and go through that mail from time to time and see if anything belongs to them.

Tax Filing+
Filing taxes is always a complicated procedure, which may become more complicated with the addition of a Visa, etc.

Clemson University employees are not allowed to give tax advice. However, the Clemson Human Resources Department has put together a great page on tax information for international students and employees, which can be found here: INTERNATIONAL TAX INFORMATION
On this page, you will find the following:
How to Determine if You Are a “Resident” or “Non-Resident” for Tax Purposes
What to Do Before You File Taxes
Free Clemson Area Tax Prep Locations Offered Through the United Way
And More Info!
Any questions or concerns regarding taxes should be directed to a certified tax preparer or a local IRS field office.
For International students, please also see the following note from Clemson University’s International Services office:

International Services cannot offer individual assistance for filing taxes in the U.S. as we are not tax professionals. Students who need tax advice are strongly encouraged to consult a tax preparation specialist. To find a local tax preparation specialist, please visit https://www.irs.gov/uac/Contact-My-Local-Office-in-South-Carolina. You can also hire a tax professional or certified tax accountant, who charge for services.

More information regarding F-1 and J-1 Visa holders filing taxes can be found here: FILING U.S. TAXES

Transportation+
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There are a number of transportation options for CU-ICAR students.

The Greenlink St. Francis-CU-ICAR shuttle is a 12.5-mile loop that runs from the St. Francis Eastside Hospital on Patewood Drive, along Woodruff Road to Waterside Apartments, onto Verdae Boulevard and passes the Route 8 shelter with connections to downtown Greenville. The loop then heads to Laurens Road and the St. Francis Millennium campus at Innovation Drive, before stopping at CU-ICAR off Millennium Boulevard and returning to St. Francis Eastside. The shuttle runs every 30 minutes. The current operation schedule* is Monday-Friday from 5:30 a.m. – 7:30 p.m. and Saturday from 8:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. The shuttle does not run on Sunday or holidays (New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving or Christmas).

Tiger Commute links CU-ICAR with Clemson’s main campus. Please review the PDF to see the route (page 2) and schedule (pages 3-4 and 6). This service does not run on weekends or university holidays.

The United States faces an urgent shortage of skilled technical workers, according to a new National Science Board report that cites a Clemson University center, CA²VES, as an example of how partnerships could be part of the solution.

CA²VES is an acronym for the Center for Aviation and Automotive Technological Education Using Virtual E-Schools. It was funded through the National Science Foundation’s Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program.

The work done by the the Center for Aviation and Automotive Technological Education Using Virtual E-Schools is helping craft the nation’s engineering and science enterprise, which is crucial to competitiveness in advanced manufacturing.
The Center for Aviation and Automotive Technological Education Using Virtual E-Schools is helping craft the nation’s engineering and science enterprise, which is crucial to competitiveness in advanced manufacturing.
CA²VES is part of the Clemson University Center for Workforce Development (CUCWD). CA²VES and CUCWD are housed in the Clemson University Center for Advanced Manufacturing (CU-CAM). CU-CAM is part of a comprehensive strategy aimed at improving manufacturing effectiveness, quality and sustainability.

CA²VES, CUCWD and CU-CAM are all part of Clemson University’s College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences, where Anand Gramopadhye is dean. He is also the principal investigator on the grant that funded CA²VES.

The National Science Board called its report, “The Skilled Technical Workforce: Crafting America’s Science & Engineering Enterprise.” CA²VES is featured on page 27 of the report, which can be found here.

The CA²VES partnerships featured in the report are just one piece of the College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences’ efforts to coordinate with the state’s technical and community colleges for the betterment of students and the state as a whole.

One of the more recent additions is Student Pathways in Engineering and Computing for Transfers (SPECTRA). SPECTRA is funded through the National Science Foundation’s Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) program.

SPECTRA is providing $3 million in need-based scholarships over five years to students who transfer from state technical and community colleges to the College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences.

Another $2 million is paying for an assortment of programs, many aimed at helping transfer students form a community to support each other through some of higher education’s toughest majors. Researchers are studying what works and are planning to share the results with the nation.

SPECTRA is overseen by Christopher Kitchens, associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.

In the National Science Board report, CA²VES was cited in a section headlined, “The Power of Partnerships: Universities and Community/Technical Colleges.”

SPECTRA is part of Clemson University’s effort to collaborate with technical and community colleges across South Carolina.
SPECTRA is part of Clemson University’s effort to collaborate with technical and community colleges across South Carolina.
The board wrote that bringing together universities, community colleges and technical colleges can improve diversity, broaden pathways into higher education, support regional workforce development and accelerate translation of university research to market.

Researchers in CA²VES worked with industry to develop cutting-edge educational modules that teach a variety of skills needed for careers in advanced manufacturing. The modules, including several in virtual reality, are offered to community and technical colleges across the nation through EducateWorkforce.com.

“Our combined efforts are helping prepare students for success while building the workforce that industry needs to thrive,” Gramopadhye said. “Forming strategic partnerships is not only the right thing to do for individual students, but it is an imperative for the future competitiveness of the nation and state.”

Tim Hardee, president of the SC Technical College System, said that CA²VES’ inclusion in the report shows that the state is leading the nation in efforts to create a technologically advanced workforce.

“We value our partnerships, including those formed through CA²VES, because they support our mission to provide a high-quality technical college education designed to create a skilled and ready workforce,” he said. “For students, that education can be a direct path to a high-demand, high-skilled career, or a critical step on their path to a university degree.”

The board found that the state is an important partner in workforce development efforts and cited the Coordinating Council for Workforce Development. The council coordinates statewide workforce-development efforts and is comprised of members from the state Department of Commerce, state Commission on Higher Education, presidents of research universities and community colleges and members of the business community.

The board’s report quoted Gramopadhye in the section on CA²VES.

“Partnerships provide opportunities for all while making sure our students and workforce are set for success in today’s technologically changing landscape,” he said, according to the report.

Bundled in bulky jackets and scarves, a small group of Clemson students braced against the wind on a blustery Indiana day in March while walking on one of the world’s most famous race tracks.

Two months later, 135,000 fans would flood the same spot to watch the world’s best drivers hurtle past at 200 miles per hour. Today, however, the famous Indianapolis Motor Speedway was eerily quiet. The only sound came from the 20 students and faculty in the middle of the track, all working on a lone SUV armored in sensors, cameras and complicated computer systems.

“It was bit surreal we were even there,” said Unmesh Patil, a powertrain controls engineer on Clemson’s Deep Orange 12 student team. “A lot of us chose automotive engineering because we wanted to work in motorsports. This is the dream.”

These students were doing something very few people would ever have the chance to do: Testing their designs at the largest sports venue in the world. The day’s testing was just one more step towards their goal: engineering and validating a first-of-its-kind high-speed autonomous race car.

The 40-student team unveiled their finished self-driving racecar in Indianapolis this past May, wrapping up a whirlwind 18-month design cycle resulting in one of the most advanced self-driving projects ever attempted. Later this year, the Clemson car will be duplicated around a dozen times for use in a head-to-head autonomous race — making it one of the first university-designed vehicles to go into series production.

The Grand Challenge

Designed for series production: As one of the first university-engineered vehicles to go into series production, Clemson students had to build manufacturability into their design, balancing performance and functionality with easy, low-cost reproducibility.
In 2018, a small group of industry leaders, educators and economic developers gathered in Indianapolis to discuss a crazy idea: Putting on the first-ever head-to-head autonomous vehicle race, and run by students to boot.

“They outlined a vision, and we knew Deep Orange was the missing piece,” said Robert Prucka, Deep Orange 12 faculty lead and Kulwicki Endowed Professor in Motorsports Engineering and associate professor with the Clemson University Department of Automotive Engineering. “Here at Clemson, our expertise is engineering prototype cars with students. It was a natural fit for us to take this on.”

Every year, a team of Clemson automotive engineering students is tasked with designing a prototype vehicle to answer a grand challenge. Known as Deep Orange, the long-running program has brought in major OEMs and global suppliers to guide students through the harrowing vehicle design process. This year, however, it was different: Not only did students have to design cutting-edge autonomous systems, but their prototype had to operate at high speeds, follow complicated race control procedures and fit into a tightly-constrained, aerodynamic package.

From traditional OEMs and technology giants to well-funded startups, self-driving technology is transforming the mobility in the race for safety improvements and untapped business opportunities. Companies are pouring billions into R&D efforts, hiring armies of specialized engineers and logging millions of road miles. Challenges abound for applying autonomy to street vehicles, from handling unpredictable road hazards to cybersecurity and legal hurdles.

Autonomy in head-to-head racing goes one step further, pushing the limits of available technology to achieve sufficient speed, synchronicity, reliability and redundancy.

At 180 mph, Clemson’s racecar covers the length of a football field in 1.2 seconds. The sensor suite — including cameras, radars, long-distance LiDARs and high-precision GPS sensors — collects data so fast it can fill up a 1TB hard drive in 20 minutes. For scale, the Hubble Space Telescope generates 10TB per year, according to NASA. This puts a tremendous burden on the perception and computing systems to quickly, reliably and synchronously control the car at speeds much higher than typical consumer vehicles.

On top of those challenges, Clemson was tasked with making sure the vehicle could be produced multiple times in a cost effective and timely manner. This is far beyond previous Deep Orange projects, said Prucka.

“It’s an incredibly ambitious challenge, not just in the technology itself but with the short timeline, series production, disparate systems, and of course, staying safe during COVID,” said Prucka. “We ended up far exceeding our scope just due to the unprecedented nature of the project, of the grand challenge. We simply couldn’t know everything that would be required from the start.”

The Journey

Collaboration with industry leaders: Over 18 months and during a pandemic, the Clemson student team honed both their hard and soft skills by collaborating with more than 38 global partners to deliver a first-of-its-kind autonomous racecar capable of high-speed racing.
So how do you engineer a first-ever autonomous racecar? The first challenge is building the team, says Janam Sanghavi, Deep Orange 12 Program Manager (’21). Previous Deep Orange projects divided students into traditional subsystems, but that same structure didn’t make sense for the Deep Orange 12 scope. One team strategy came down to making a plan for each of the primary controls they needed to design: steering, braking, gear shifting and throttle.

“We thought of making cross-functional teams around those problems, where people from each subsystem team came together to focus only on that control,” said Sanghavi. “I’m very proud of that, especially since it worked.”

The next challenge was determining the design envelope based on customer requirements. Similar to the OEM design process for consumer-focused vehicles, previous Deep Orange teams built out 3-4 personas to guide their designs. For Deep Orange 12, the customer was harder to define. In one sense, it was the competition teams developing autonomous algorithms ahead of a head-to-head race in October. In another, it was the partners responsible for reproducing the racecar, dictating that it be easily and cost effectively manufactured. In yet another, it was Clemson University aiming to provide unparalleled educational experiences and develop high-impact automotive engineering leaders.

Deep Orange 12 collaborated with more than 38 suppliers, partners and organizations over the project’s 12-month timeline, often co-creating brand new engineering solutions, components, software and capabilities tailored to the Clemson project. Such collaboration is critical to innovation, not only to find the best solutions but to ensure timely and cost-effective manufacturability. An inexpensive part that took six months to arrive, or a component requiring frequent or costly maintenance, were no-go solutions. Their choices determined the final bill of materials, production schedule and supply chain plan, all of which passed to the partners responsible for series production.

From there, it was all hands on deck to get things to work, said Akshay Palakkal, a controls integration engineer on the project.

“Because of COVID, a lot of our roles got shuffled around. You did what needed to be done regardless of your title. Even though I’m on the powertrain team, we made wiring harnesses, designed 3D models, anything that needed to be done because our deadlines were so aggressive,” he said. “One major challenge was working remotely. My old manager used to say, ‘You can’t build a car behind a computer.’ I never used to believe that, but now I see how it slows down everything. A 10-minute in-person brainstorming session is more valuable than five Zoom meetings.”

In March, students headed to Indianapolis to collect data using a surrogate vehicle, one outfitted with identical cameras, radars, long-distance LiDARs and high-precision GPS sensors as the final design. The project’s final milestones followed soon after, starting with the first engine fire and proof-of-concept of the autonomous systems and finally, a fully autonomous lap on the track.

“We’re excited, exhausted, worried, stressed out. Over the last year and a half, our subsystem teams have gone days in the lab trying to meet deadlines, to get the car ready, to get systems to work,” said Shristy Sagar, Deep Orange 12 Vehicle Structures Lead. “It’s incredible to see our first car drive by, to be followed by many more, and know we designed them. It’s probably the proudest moment of our lives.”

The Engineering Leaders of the Future

Designed for series production: As one of the first university-engineered vehicles to go into series production, Clemson students had to build manufacturability into their design, balancing performance and functionality with easy, low-cost reproducibility.
A crucial component of Deep Orange is how students work closely with industry leaders, developing the soft skills and project management prowess to launch their careers. As students attempt one of the most challenging programs of its kind, mentors guide them to avoid common pitfalls, develop interpersonal skills and ingrain best practices to help them after graduation.

A month after graduation, more than 95% of the Deep Orange 12 team have found roles in industry, some with traditional OEMs and others at high-profile mobility startups and technology companies.

“We say it all the time, but the ideal outcome of Deep Orange is highly capable students,” said Chris Paredis. “This was an incredibly challenging project, but if our experience tells us anything, it’s that these learning experiences have a tremendous impact on their success after they leave Clemson.”

The student team presented their final design in May, sharing it with their colleagues, their mentors and most importantly, their parents.

“This experience is so unique. Most autonomous projects in motorsports are confined to 1/10th scale cars, or working on specific subsystems. Most of us don’t get to work on something like this, something that has never been done,” said Unmesh Patil, a powertrain controls engineer on the project. “Without parental support, I think this project would be impossible to do. We got to share it with our families, I shared it with my mother during our final presentation. We don’t usually get to discuss these things in that much detail, and I was very excited to share that with her.”

“It’s been a huge learning curve, a lot of changes and how we’ve adapted and made things possible, it’s quite a feat that the entire team has pulled together. Autonomy is in the budding stages, and as students we are learning and applying things, so there’s s a lot of experimentation where we continuously try things and find ways to do it. That’s where engineering shines,” said Manikanda Balaji Venkatesan, Deep Orange 12 Autonomy Lead. “I’m elated. The fact that we were able to pull this off, and exceed what we wanted to do, is just amazing.”

Under the Hood of Deep Orange 12
The Deep Orange 12 vehicle was engineered around five primary goals: Engineer an autonomous racecar, within an existing professional-level open-wheel racing chassis, to reach up to 180 mph, to be easily and cost-effectively manufacturable, that prioritizes safety. Read more about how students achieved those goals through these unique selling propositions (USPs):

Advanced Perception Systems: Students integrated a robust suite of cameras, radars, long-distance LiDARs, and centimeter-accuracy GPS sensors to observe, process and make decisions to control the car safely at racing speeds.
Precision High-speed Drive-by-wire Control: In a drive-by-wire vehicle, losing power means losing control. Students engineered electrically powered steering, braking, throttle and shifting controls with backup systems and redundant safety checks
Low-Latency, High-Throughput, Ultra-Reliable V2X Communication: Students integrated a wireless communication system that can send telemetry data such as vehicle speed, engine RPM, or tire temperatures, as well as autonomy data such as video, and localization information in real-time without data loss .
Purpose-Built Structural Racing Engine: Unlike street vehicles, the compact and lightweight packaging of Indy racecars required Clemson to design a complex engine packaging system to withstand the stresses of high-speed driving while meeting the needs of autonomous racing.
Lightning-fast On-Board Computing and Software: High-speed racing requires high-speed decision-making and controls. Students integrated a ruggedized computer specifically configured for autonomy to deliver crucial information to the competition teams.
Designed for Series Production: Students orchestrated full manufacturing plans to ensure their design could be duplicated quickly, efficiently, within budget and with easy-to obtain components. Clemson’s autonomous racecar represents the University’s first-ever vehicle to go into series production.
Rules and Procedures for Head-to-Head Autonomous Racing: To enable multi-vehicle, head-to-head autonomous racing in the spirit of both traditional racing and this competition, students wrote the rule book to dictate how vehicles must safely behave when on the racetrack.
Ultra-Compact Aerodynamic Component Packaging: At 180 mph, aerodynamics matter. Students fit all their complex systems into the space normally occupied by the driver, while preserving the aerodynamic efficiency and integrity of the ultra-lightweight chassis.
Unparalleled Systems Integration Education: Over 18 months, during a pandemic, the Clemson students honed both their hard and soft skills by collaborating with more than 38 global partners to deliver a first-of-its-kind autonomous racecar capable of high-speed racing.

Earning a master’s degree in automotive engineering provides you with advanced knowledge and skills in the field. Although one can start a career in the field with a bachelor’s degree, you would need a master’s degree to advance in the field.

But before you go for a master’s degree, you will need to know some things about the program, and we will give you basic information on masters in automotive engineering degree programs and the best schools in the world to earn them.

Automotive engineering is one of the most technologically interesting and compelling specialty areas in engineering. It requires expertise in mechanical, electrical, and computer engineering.

Although it has been in existence for 100 years, the way automobiles and highways have been integrated into various global cultures has led to this sector’s popularity.

In fact, automotive is one engineering field that is constantly changing and adapting to the requirements of users and the environment. So experts in automotive engineering are poised to develop innovations that will change society and also, address global problems.

To keep up with these changes and advancement, there is a need to continue education to get advanced knowledge and skills.

In this article, you’ll get detailed information on the best schools for a master’s in an automotive engineering degree program. You also get to know the necessary requirements for enrolling in one.

Here is a breakdown of what to expect:

TABLE OF CONTENTS
What Is Automotive Engineering?
Why Pursue a Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?
Master’s Degree in Automotive Engineering Coursework
What Are the Requirements For A Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?
What Is The Cost For A Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?
How Long Does It Take To A Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?
Which Universities offer the Best Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?

1 Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands (TU/e)

2 University of Leeds, United Kingdom

3 RWTH Aachen University, Germany

4 RMIT University, Australia

5 University of Michigan, USA

6 University of Hertfordshire, UK

7 TH Koln University of Applied Sciences, Germany

8 TU Dortmund University

9 University of South Wales

10 Loughborough University

11 Birmingham City University

12 Clemson University

13 Vilnius Gediminas Technical University

FAQs On 13 Best Masters In Automotive Engineering | Schools, Requirements, Cost
Conclusion
References
AUTHOR’S RECOMMENDATION
What Is Automotive Engineering?
Automotive engineering deals with the design, manufacture, and operation of motorcycles, automobiles, and trucks and their respective engineering subsystems.

It is basically a branch of mechanical engineering. It is also a branch of vehicle engineering just like aerospace engineering and naval architecture.

The automotive engineering field covers the production, development, and manufacturing of automobiles by incorporating elements of mechanical, electrical, electronic, software, and safety engineering.

To become an automotive engineer, you must first earn a bachelor’s degree. Currently, very few universities offer a bachelor’s degree in automotive engineering. However, you can earn a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from a school that has a concentration in automotive engineering.

After this, you can now pursue a master’s degree program in automotive engineering. Stay with me for detailed information on this program.

Read more: 13 Best Automotive Engineering Schools In The World for a Bachelor’s Degree Program

Why Pursue a Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?
Unlike a bachelor’s degree, a master’s program offers students an opportunity to focus on a particular aspect of automotive engineering. Common specialization tracks are manufacturing processes, electrical and computer systems, mechanical systems, and materials science.

Also, masters in automotive engineering students get specialized automotive engineering knowledge and skills.

This is because the Master of Science in Automotive Engineering program provides them with knowledge of the corresponding new technologies as well as technical and organizational processes. It also enables them to actively participate in and develop concepts and innovations in professional fields of vehicle and vehicle component development.

In addition, just like other master’s degree programs, masters in automotive engineering offer research opportunities for students.

Master’s Degree in Automotive Engineering Coursework
A typical master’s degree in automotive engineering program covers the following courses:

Design and manufacturing
Energy and environment
Materials
Noise and vibration
Electronics and computer software
Ergonomics
Powertrain
Dynamics and control
In order to complete the degree, students must present a final project or thesis paper. It takes about two years to complete a master’s degree program in automotive engineering.

What Are the Requirements For A Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?
The major requirement you need to enroll for a master’s program in this field is a bachelor’s degree in automotive engineering or another related discipline.

Other requirements may vary among programs, schools, and countries. Nevertheless, below is a list of common requirements for a masters in an automotive engineering degree program:

Recognized Bachelor Degree.
Proof of Language Proficiency.
Relevant Professional Job Experience.
Letter of Motivation.
Letter of Reference.
What Is The Cost For A Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?
The tuition fee for a master’s in automotive engineering varies among programs, schools, and countries. You are therefore advised to visit the financial page of your chosen school for the exact cost.

How Long Does It Take To A Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?
It takes about 2 years to complete a master’s in the automotive engineering degree program. However, some can be completed in a shorter period let’s say one year while others (especially part-time programs) take a longer time.

Which Universities offer the Best Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?
Several schools offer a master’s degree in automotive engineering programs all over the world. However, to effectively rank these universities, we used some factors.

Here are the ranking factors.

For your degree to count, you have to earn it form an accredited institution. Hence, the need to ascertain the accreditation status of the automotive engineering program before applying.

Here we take cognizance of the accreditation status of the automotive engineering master’s degree programs.

Institutions that have a good number of dedicated facilities for research in a certain program rank higher than those with little or n dedicated facilities for the program as they would tend to be at the forefront of academic advancement for the discipline.

For your degree to count, you have to earn it form an accredited institution. Hence, the need to ascertain the accreditation status of the automotive engineering program before applying.

Here we take cognizance of the accreditation status of the automotive engineering master’s degree programs.

Institutions that have a good number of dedicated facilities for research in a certain program rank higher than those with little or n dedicated facilities for the program as they would tend to be at the forefront of academic advancement for the discipline.

Here are the top universities where you can study the best masters in automotive engineering degree programs:

Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands
University of Leeds, United Kingdom
RWTH Aachen University, Germany
RMIT University, Australia
University of Michigan
University of Hertfordshire
TH Koln University of Applied Sciences.
TU Dortmund University.
University of South Wales
Loughborough University
Birmingham City University
Clemson University
Vilnius Gediminas Technical University

1 Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands (TU/e)

Accreditation: Accreditation Organisation of the Netherlands and Flanders (NVAO)

Duration: 2 years

Credit Points: 120

Combining scientific curiosity with a hands-on mentality, Eindhoven University of Technology, a top-ranking Dutch university offers one of the best masters programs in automotive technology and engineering.

The TU/e campus is in the center of one of the most powerful technology hubs in the world: Brainport Eindhoven.

Based on a systems approach, TU/e MSc program Automotive Technology provides multidisciplinary knowledge for today’s high-tech automotive industry.

In this Master of Automotive Technology program, you will learn how to view the car as a system. The program offers in-depth knowledge about essential parts of a vehicle, and about vehicle-to-vehicle communication and control.

The system approach used here is also demonstrated by the program being a joint initiative of five departments.

With no other comparable programs in Europe, the TU/e Master of Automotive Technology program offers you an outstanding starting point for a successful career in the automotive industry.

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2 University of Leeds, United Kingdom

Accreditation: Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE)

Duration: 12 months full time

Credit Points: 120

The Automotive Engineering MSc (Eng) at the University of Leeds will equip you with the knowledge and skills you need to meet the needs of the automotive industry in the advanced areas of analysis, design, and manufacture. It will also prepare you to work in a range of different settings.

The core modules will develop your knowledge of key fields like chassis and driveline engineering, and human factors in automotive. The knowledge gotten here is then used during the design and build project.

During the course of the program, particular emphasis is also laid on computational methods and software packages in automotive engineering analysis, design and manufacture. Depending on the modules, you could use Matlab, Fusion360, Abaqus finite element code, Fluent CFD, SolidWorks CAE and LabView.

Furthermore, students at the University of Leeds benefit from working in world-class specialist facilities for different aspects of automotive engineering. These include

A brake test area and measurement lab
The latest industry-standard software for computational fluid dynamics
Finite element modeling of systems and materials.
Basic Entry Requirement: A bachelor’s degree with a 2:1 (Hons) in a relevant engineering discipline.

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3 RWTH Aachen University, Germany

Accreditation: ASIIN

Duration: 3 semesters

Credit Points: 120

RWTH Aachen University is the biggest university of technology in Germany and also one of the leading institutions in Europe for science and research. It is one of the top universities for masters degree programs in automotive engineering.

Taught both in German and English languages, students in the Automotive Engineering M.Sc. program learn about the technological basics and in-depth knowledge in the conception and the development of passenger cars and commercial vehicles, and optionally of motorcycles and off-highway vehicles.

Course modules here cover all of the vehicle’s main domains such as chassis, body, drivetrain, safety, driver assistance systems, and others.

On completion, graduates will be proficient in relevant technological areas like vehicle dynamics, energy efficiency, acoustics, mechatronics, structural fatigue, and durability.

Reason being that the program provides in-depth knowledge of industrial design approaches and research topics with regard to real-world vehicle requirements, market developments, and legislative constraints.

Graduates of this master’s program have an underlining excellent prospects following the school’s outstanding reputation.

Basic Entry Requirement: A bachelor’s degree in mechanical or automotive engineering (minimum 7 semesters).

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4 RMIT University, Australia

Accreditation: Engineers Australia

Duration: Full-time 2 years, Part-time 4 years

Credit Points: 192

The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology(RMIT) is a leader in the automotive engineering field. RMIT provides a wide range of courses and large research centers that allows students to share expertise and resources. It is currently one of the best universities that offer masters in automotive engineering degree programs.

Here, students gain the skills to be a technological leader capable of managing innovation in both automotive design and manufacturing settings.

The program is basically designed to meet the needs of the global automotive industry. The focus is on sustainable design and manufacturing practices based on the entire life cycle (from ‘cradle to grave’) of vehicles.

So as a student, you’ll develop the skills to take a leading role in automotive engineering design, manufacturing, and testing using contemporary engineering methods and computational and experimental tools.

You also have the flexibility to specialize in either advanced automotive design and development or automotive manufacturing.

RMIT automotive engineering masters students use advanced computer-aided engineering software such as LS-DYNA and Abaqus and gain hands-on experience in several state-of-the-art experimental facilities, including the full-scale Vehicle Wind Tunnel, Green Engines Research Laboratory, and Vehicle NVH Laboratory.

Graduates of this program have the opportunity to do work experience with multinational companies, enhancing their employment opportunities in the global job market. Also, there are exchange opportunities between RMIT and universities worldwide, including opportunities for dual masters’ awards.

Basic Entry Requirement: Successful completion of an Australian bachelor’s degree (or international equivalent) in one of the following fields: Aerospace, Mechanical, Manufacturing, Mechatronics, Sustainable Systems, or Automotive Engineering with a GPA of at least 2.0 out of 4.0.

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5 University of Michigan, USA

Accreditation: ABET

Duration: 2 years

Credit Hours: 30

Ranked #1 in the best masters in automotive engineering programs in the USA, the University of Michigan offers the program both on-campus and online.

The Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) in Automotive Engineering at the University of Michigan is an advanced professional degree program that is designed specifically for today’s engineering world.

With an emphasis on recent advances in engineering fundamentals and practice, this degree program prepares students to be innovators who can address global problems in this technologically dynamic and compelling field.

The automotive curriculum features courses on state-of-the-art engineering competencies such as:

Advanced Technology Powertrain Design and Control
Hybrid Electric Vehicles and Battery Systems
Self-driving cars
Automotive Electronics: Electric machines and power electronics
Embedded Microprocessor Control Systems
Furthermore, students who graduate from this program have strengths in modern automotive systems, engineering fundamentals, enhanced interdisciplinary skills, and the teamwork skills necessary to guide product and process development in this rapidly evolving field.

Basic Entry Requirement: A bachelor’s degree in automotive engineering or a relevant engineering field.

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6 University of Hertfordshire, UK

Accreditation: RAes; IMechE

Duration: Full Time, 18 Months; Full Time, 1 Year; Part Time, 3 Years

Credit Points: 90

The University of Hertfordshire has been running automotive degree courses for almost forty years and is very well-established within the automotive industry.

The aim of the MSc in Automotive Engineering is to equip students with the theory and the practice of relevant materials, technologies, and analytical tools to provide solutions for automotive design and manufacturing problems.

It also aims to provide students with the opportunity to use creativity and innovation in the application of technology to the development of the automobile.

In line with the above, the MSc in Automotive Engineering has been specifically designed to enhance the employment and promotional opportunities of graduates in mechanical and automotive engineering. The program considers in-depth key areas of automotive technology.

In fact, its integrated design covers both the technological and management aspects of the motor industry.

The University of Hertfordshire has excellent facilities in automotive engineering technology including:

In-house engine dyno facilities
A rolling road
A four-poster shaker rig
A Cruden driver in the loop vehicle simulator.
Furthermore, graduates’ employment prospects are excellent. As a graduate, you can expect to be employed in design, manufacturing, or testing in one of the major automotive companies in the UK or internationally.

Basic Entry Requirement: An honors degree (at least 2:2 or above) in mechanical or automotive engineering. Note that other disciplines may be considered.

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7 TH Koln University of Applied Sciences, Germany

Accreditation: ASIIN

Duration: 3 semesters

Credit Points: 90

The Master of Science in Automotive Engineering at TH Koln University of Applied Sciences builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in the Bachelor’s degree program.

The course contents of this degree program are geared towards the ability to absorb and implement engineering innovations for automotive development throughout one’s lifetime.

In this three-semester Master’s program, the students deepen their expertise in the field of automotive engineering. Also, content on new developments in vehicle manufacturing is taught.

In addition, the close practical orientation of the lecturers to the automotive industry and the wide range of modern vehicle development laboratories ensure that you will be able to acquire excellent practical knowledge during your studies.

The program concludes with the Master thesis, in which an engineering topic from the automotive engineering field is independently worked on.

Interestingly, you can either sign up for this Master of Science (M. Sc.) in the automotive engineering program in the summer or winter semester.

Basic Entry Requirement: A bachelor’s degree in automotive engineering or a relevant engineering field.

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8 TU Dortmund University

Accreditation: ASIIN

Duration: 2 years

Credit Points: 120

The M.Sc. Automation and Robotics Program at TU Dortmund University is interdisciplinary and covers all relevant areas which contribute to this field.

This Masters in Automation and Robotics program is an English-language degree program. It is aligned with in­ter­na­tio­nal benchmarks, offering very good teaching, well-equipped modern laboratories, and opportunities for application-oriented research.

Also, interdisciplinarity is built into its structure, with active participation by the faculties of Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Computer Science, Biochemical and Chemical Engineering, and Mathematics as well as the Robotics Research Institute and the Fraunhofer Institute for Logistics.

Furthermore, graduates of the program can work in research and development as well as design and production in many industries including, for example, the automobile, chemical, and aerospace industries.

Basic Entry Requirement: A relevant Bachelor’s degree with a good grade (2.5) in Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Information and Communications Technology, Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, or Chemical Engineering from TU Dort­mund University or a comparable degree.

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9 University of South Wales

Accreditation: IET

Duration: 4 years

Credit Points: –

The University of South Wales has a strong reputation in automotive research and development. It is currently among the top schools that offer one of the best masters programs in automotive engineering in the world.

The Automotive Engineering degrees available here will provide you with the knowledge and skills required in the modern automotive industry, with a focus on autonomous vehicle technology.

However, the four-year Master of Engineering course is designed to give you a higher technical knowledge, and is the highest award for undergraduate study in engineering.

In terms of research, the Centre for Automotive and Power Systems Engineering (CAPSE) undertakes research and consultancy for some of the top car manufacturing companies. In fact, the University of South Wales has strong links with the automotive sector and we place considerable emphasis on student’s projects.

Students here also have access to facilities which include Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and analysis software, automotive engine testbeds, a gas turbine plant, laser scanning arm, and wind tunnel.

Furthermore, as part of your studies as a student, you will have the chance to be involved in the development of a formula student racing car.

Note that studying on the MEng Automotive Engineering course will remove the need to source further funding to study a Masters-level qualification.

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10 Loughborough University

Accreditation: IMechE

Duration: Full-time 1 year, Part-time 3 years

Credit Points: 120

Loughborough University offers one of the best masters in automotive engineering degree programs in the world.

Basically, the Automotive Engineering MSc program at Loughborough University aims to provide those of you with an interest in the automotive industry, with knowledge and technical expertise in a wide range of automotive disciplines.

It was created with industry partners, including Ford Motor Company and Jaguar Land Rover, and will provide students with the knowledge and technical expertise in a wide range of automotive disciplines.

The department also has a strong and growing research program with world-class research activities and facilities.

Interestingly, a key element of the MSc Automotive Systems Engineering program is the opportunity for students to access the vehicle proving ground facilities at Horiba MIRA Ltd near Nuneaton. This forms part of Europe’s largest transport technology research and development cluster.

Furthermore, graduates from here work primarily in product design and development groups, and are sought after by a wide range of automotive companies.

Basic Entry Requirement: A bachelor’s degree (2:1 or above) in automotive engineering or a relevant engineering field.

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11 Birmingham City University

Accreditation: IMechE, IET

Duration: 2 years

Credit Points: 180

The MSc Automotive Engineering course at Birmingham City University will teach you the skills you need to become a highly-skilled engineer, capable of undertaking related tasks within and across different organizations.

Basically, the program encourages creative thinking and the development of engineering leadership skills, as well as teaches students how to solve problems through research.

Students here also engage in independent study, advancing their understanding and developing new skills.

The state-of-the-art laboratories at Birmingham City University help enhance students’ educational experience by providing a bridge between theoretical learning and hands-on teaching to prepare them for a career in industry.

Basic Entry Requirement: A Second Class Honours degree or equivalent in an appropriate discipline.

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12 Clemson University

Accreditation: ABET

Duration: 2 years

Credit Hours: 36

Master’s in Automotive Engineering at Clemson blends intense technical study and strong science-based skill-building with an emphasis on leadership and other business acumen needed to thrive in an ever-evolving global economy.

The hands-on, holistic approach ensures that graduates move seamlessly into employment within the automotive industry or academia.

Classes take place at Clemson’s state-of-the-art engineering facilities at the Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR) in Greenville, South Carolina.

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13 Vilnius Gediminas Technical University

Accreditation: The Centre for Quality Assessment in Higher Education

Duration: 2 years

Credit Points: 120

Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, the leader in technological sciences in Lithuania offers one of the best masters programs in automotive engineering. On completion of the automotive engineering program receive a Master of Engineering Sciences degree.

Basically, the aim of the master’s degree in Automotive Engineering at Vilnius Gediminas Technical University is to produce well-trained students who will be future professionals and respond to the needs of this industrial sector.

It also aims to provide graduates with a wide range of technical skills and independent learning ability to make them effective in organizations that design and develop automotive products.

So graduates of this program are employed in the automotive industry, which comprises a range of businesses, institutes and agencies active in the research, development, manufacturing, validating, maintaining and selling of products associated with vehicles and transport system.

Basic Entry Requirement: A bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering, Transport Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Physics.

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FAQs On 13 Best Masters In Automotive Engineering | Schools, Requirements, Cost
What Is Automotive Engineering?
Automotive engineering deals with the design, manufacture, and operation of motorcycles, automobiles, and trucks and their respective engineering subsystems.

What Are the Requirements For A Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?

  1. Recognized Bachelor Degree.
  2. Proof of Language Proficiency.
  3. Relevant Professional Job Experience.
  4. Letter of Motivation.
  5. Letter of Reference.

How Long Does It Take To A Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?
It takes about 2 years to complete a master’s in the automotive engineering degree program. However, some can be completed in a shorter period let’s say one year while others (especially part-time programs) take a longer time.

Which Universities offer the Best Masters In Automotive Engineering Degree Program?
Here are the top universities where you can study the best masters in automotive engineering degree programs:

  1. Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands
  2. University of Leeds, United Kingdom
  3. RWTH Aachen University, Germany
  4. RMIT University, Australia
  5. University of Michigan
  6. University of Hertfordshire
  7. TH Koln University of Applied Sciences.
  8. TU Dortmund University.
  9. University of South Wales
  10. Loughborough University
  11. Birmingham City University
  12. Clemson University
  13. Vilnius Gediminas Technical University

Conclusion
To move with the continuous changes in the automotive engineering word, there is a need for continuing education. With a masters in automotive engineering degree, you wouldn’t only get specialized automotive engineering knowledge, you’ll also develop new skills

The article above provides you with vital information on the top universities that offer masters in automotive engineering degree programs in the world.

I hope this helps you in your decision making process.

Good Luck And Success!!!

References
EducatingEngineers – Automotive Engineering Degrees
MastersPortal – Masters in Engineering & Technology
IndiaEducation – Masters in Automotive Engineering Abroad
Study.com – Automotive Engineering Schools with Degree Program Overviews
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