Tufts University School of Medicine Requirements

Last Updated on December 28, 2022 by Omoyeni Adeniyi

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About Tufts Medical School Curriculum

Tufts University School of Medicine encourages applicants from all disciplines to apply and we do not favor any particular undergraduate major. We believe the premedical requirements/competencies listed below will prepare applicants best for the scientific rigor of your medical education. In preparation for being a successful medical student and physician, we strongly encourage applicants to obtain a broad based liberal arts education. Course work may include studies in ethics, philosophy, sociology, psychology, history and the arts. This broad-based educational approach is critical to being successful in the Tufts School of Medicine educational curriculum with its strong emphasis on health care systems and social determinants of health. Knowledge of a second language is strongly encouraged and helps prepare our students and graduates for working in our multicultural society. All of this will contribute to a well-educated, balanced and healthy physician.

Some prerequisites are defined in terms of coursework and others are defined in terms of competencies.

Courses taken to fulfill prerequisites are expected to be those courses designated for undergraduate science majors. Prerequisite coursework is defined in terms of traditional academic years with semesters. Many undergraduate institutions offer courses in other formats, and we will accept the courses and/or sequences that your undergraduate school offers as equivalencies to traditional semester courses and sequences. If you have taken courses in more than one format, you are welcome to apply if you believe your aggregate curriculum is equivalent to our prerequisites. If your coursework differs, you can detail and support these differences on our secondary application.

Tufts School of Medicine defines competency as a specific learned ability demonstrated at a minimum, an entry-level skill set (knowledge, reflection, reasoning, curiosity, interpretive ability) needed to succeed in medical school. Competencies may be gained through a variety of means including but not limited to formal courses, work and life experiences.

Coursework Prerequisites:
Biology: Full year of introductory or advanced biology coursework. Any courses offered by the biology department for science majors are acceptable.

Chemistry: Two years of chemistry coursework that includes at least one semester course in general chemistry and one semester course in organic chemistry. A semester course in biochemistry is highly recommended and may count towards the two year total. Examples (in semesters): 2 general + 2 organic, or 2 general + 1 organic + 1 biochemistry, or 1 general + 2 organic + 1 biochemistry

Physics: A semester of physics coursework. Any course offered by the physics department for science majors is acceptable. AP credit will not count for your physics requirement. However, the requirement can be satisfied by completing a course where physics was a prerequisite or completing an advanced course that incorporates physics (e.g. physical chemistry or engineering course). You should document this information with an explanation on your secondary application.

Advanced Placement: Advanced Placement (AP) credit does not reduce required coursework for biology and physics. Applicants with AP credit in these disciplines are expected to take a full year of college coursework in biology and a semester of college coursework in physics (see above for physics). For chemistry, AP credit may be applied toward the general chemistry requirement and as one semester of the two years total required coursework. Applicants with AP credit in chemistry must present at least a year and a half of college chemistry coursework that includes at least one semester course in organic chemistry. Examples (in semesters): 1 AP + 1 general + 2 organic or 1 AP + 1 general + 1 organic + 1 biochemistry or 1 AP + 2 organic + 1 biochemistry

Exemption Exams: Do not apply toward course prerequisites.

Competency Prerequisites:
English: Competency in spoken and written English. English literature coursework is not required. As an example, completing a bachelor’s degree in an English speaking college or university demonstrates this competency.

Math: Competency in the basic concepts of statistics. May be acquired through an introductory course in statistics, as a topic in a science or social science course, or through experience with a research project.

Biology: Competency in Mendelian genetics as well as cell and molecular biology. Usually acquired in introductory biology courses. Upper level courses in genetics and/or cell and molecular biology are helpful but not required. (Note: Coursework that fulfills the biology prerequisite requirement may also be used to fulfill the competency requirement, if applicable.)

Laboratory: Competency in laboratory skills equivalent to two years of laboratory course work. Usually acquired in the laboratory sections of biology and chemistry courses. Laboratory experience in other settings, including employment settings, is also acceptable. Applicants are generally expected to take the laboratory component of undergraduate science courses when available.

Coursework FAQ:
Tufts University School of Medicine accepts credit for prerequisite courses at community colleges or online. We understand that circumstances may lead applicants to complete coursework at either community colleges or online. In these circumstances, we encourage you to discuss the reasons for your educational pathway on your application.
Courses need to be completed prior to enrollment, but not necessarily prior to application. Courses may be taken during the application year. However, the most competitive applicants will have completed the premed requirements prior to submission of the application.
Tufts University School of Medicine does not have an expiration policy regarding prerequisite courses although we do expect some recent scientific coursework or involvement.
The Tufts University School of Medicine Premedical Course Requirements were updated in October 2018 and will take effect for the 2020 application cycle

The selection of applicants for admission into the MD Program is based not only on performance in the required premedical courses, but also on the applicant’s entire academic record and extracurricular experiences. Letters of recommendation and information supplied by the applicant are reviewed for indications of promise and suitability for a medical career. Applicants must complete all degree programs they are enrolled in (undergraduate and all other) by the time of matriculation. Preference is given to applicants who will earn a bachelor’s degree from an accredited US college or university before medical school.

How to Apply
Meet our Eligibility Requirements: Undergraduates with any majors are welcome to apply, provided they meet our course prerequisites and satisfy our Technical Standards. We also welcome candidates with non-traditional backgrounds.
Provide MCAT Scores: Nearly all U.S. medical schools require applicants to submit MCAT scores. Tufts School of Medicine applicants must take the Medical College Admissions Test within five years preceding enrollment. Applicants may initiate an application prior to taking the exam, but MCAT scores are needed to complete an application and must be received prior to the January 15 Secondary Application deadline.
Complete the AMCAS Application: Applicants must complete and submit the online application of the American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS). AMCAS distributes applications to designated medical school admissions offices from June through November. Applicants must complete their AMCAS application, including the submission of all transcripts, by November 1 of the application year. Tufts School of Medicine does not grant extensions to this deadline.
Complete Tufts School of Medicine Secondary Application: Applicants must complete a Secondary Application (Tufts School of Medicine does not disqualify any applicants at this stage.) The application requires you to submit letters of recommendation and a $130 application fee. (The $130 application fee is waived for any applicant who has received an AMCAS fee waiver). The secondary application is available from July until the secondary application deadline of January 15.
Our Process
Selected applicants are invited to visit the Boston campus for personal interviews between September and March. All complete applications are considered for interviews on a rolling basis. Interview decisions are sent by email to applicants stating either a notification of an interview invitation or a notification that they are no longer under consideration for an interview at Tufts. Applicants who have not received a final decision via email remain under active consideration until they do so. All applicants will receive either an invitation to interview or a letter of regret by March 31.

The interview program consists of a full day of speakers, presentations, lunch, an opportunity to meet some of our current students, a tour, and two individual interviews with members of the Admissions Committee. Interviews are scheduled only by invitation of the admissions committee, and we do not conduct regional interviews.

The Tufts University School of Medicine Admissions Committee meets monthly during the interview season and admits selected applicants on a rolling basis from October through April. Selected applicants are admitted from the Wait List during the late spring and summer as space in the entering class permits.

Admissions Timeline
June – November Tufts School of Medicine receives applications from AMCAS
July – January Tufts School of Medicine receives secondary applications and letters of recommendation
July – March Completed applications are reviewed
August 1 Deadline to complete Early Decision AMCAS application
August – March Tufts School of Medicine sends invitations to interview
September 1 Deadline to complete Early Decision Tufts School of Medicine Secondary Application
September – March Tufts School of Medicine interview season
October 1 Tufts School of Medicine notifies Early Decision applicants of application outcome
October – April Tufts School of Medicine Admissions Committee admits selected applicants
October – March Applicants no longer being considered for admission receive letter of regret
November 1 Deadline to complete regular AMCAS application
January 15 Deadline to complete regular Tufts School of Medicine Secondary Application
March 31 All applicants have received either an invitation to interview or a letter of regret
April 30 Tuition deposit refund deadline
May – July Tufts School of Medicine admits selected applicants from Wait List
Late July Orientation for the Entering Class

Selected candidates are offered the assurance of medical school admission without an MCAT score and prior to the regular admissions process. Hence, program participants reinvest the time typically spent on preparing for the MCAT and participating in the regular admissions process to explore other areas of interest during their academic careers, thus broadening their college experience.

Eligibility

How to Apply
The Prehealth Advisor at participating schools will email application instructions to potential applicants during their sophomore year.

The Tufts School of Medicine Admissions Committee reviews the applications submitted by interested candidates and invites selected candidates to visit the medical school for an interview. Interviews are typically held in April. The Admissions Committee requests selected candidates to forward transcripts to the committee after the spring term grades have been posted. After reviewing transcripts, the committee admits candidates to the program.

Candidates admitted to the program continue their studies at their undergraduate school for the duration of their current academic programs.

During this time, they are required to complete any medical school coursework prerequisites not yet taken (such as a remaining semester of chemistry or a semester of physics) by the end of their junior year (see FAQ tab for exceptions). Competency prerequisites can be completed any time prior to graduation.

Also during this time, applicants are required to maintain the following academic standards: a Science GPA and a Total GPA of 3.7 or above; a grade of B+ or greater in courses in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, including labs; and a grade of B or above in all other courses. Applicants must meet these standards for assured admission to Tufts School of Medicine. Applicants who do not entirely meet these academic standards are not assured admission to Tufts School of Medicine, but may be admitted at the discretion of the Admissions Committee.

Tufts University School of Medicine - Wikipedia

In the summer or fall of their senior year, candidates apply to Tufts School of Medicine via an AMCAS special program application that precludes applying to other medical schools.

If these requirements are met, admission to Tufts School of Medicine is assured.

All offers of admission to Tufts School of Medicine, both via the Early Assurance Program and via the regular admissions process, are contingent upon the following:

Satisfactory completion and Tufts School of Medicine review of the AAMC-facilitated criminal background check (see AAMC website for details of the service)
Your ability to fulfill the Technical Standards of Tufts School of Medicine
Your compliance with a high standard of ethical conduct and integrity, both before and after your admission to Tufts School of Medicine (see details below)
As a prospective medical student you are embarking on a professional career which requires a high standard of ethical conduct and integrity. It is expected that students admitted to Tufts University School of Medicine will make a personal commitment to abide by a standard of behavior that will establish a firm foundation for future professional conduct. This requires avoidance of any form of intellectual dishonesty as well as the demonstration of respect for the rights and well being of others. Prospective Tufts students are expected to be responsible citizens of their own community as well as the greater community. They are expected to comply with all university policies, local ordinances, and state and federal laws. Failure to uphold these requirements prior to enrollment at Tufts University School of Medicine may result in the rescinding of an Offer of Admission.

Students entering into Tufts School of Medicine​ via the Early Assurance Program will not be required to sit for the MCAT examination prior to matriculation.

Commitments

Frequently Asked Questions
How many students apply to the traditional MD Early Assurance Program, and how many are admitted?

I know that to be eligible to apply, I must have taken at least 5 science courses by the end of my sophomore year. Can I apply if some of those courses were taken during the summer, at another school, or as AP courses in high school?

What happens if I am admitted to the Early Assurance Program but do not finish my premed courses during my junior year following admission? What if I schedule physics for my senior year?

May I complete courses under the Exceptional Pass grading option?
All applicants are strongly encouraged to complete their coursework for a traditional grade when the option to do so exists. This is particularly true for prerequisite and science courses. The Early Assurance program is a competitive and highly selective admissions option. Since the MCAT is waived for EAP applicants, this puts greater emphasis on coursework and grades to determine an applicant’s fit and readiness for medical school.

Again, we strongly encourage EAP applicants to complete coursework for a traditional grade. Exceptions to this will be considered on a case by case basis. Exceptions should only be requested in extenuating situations or where the option is deemed appropriate.

Tufts Medical School gives students the chance to take advantage of this wonderful city and call it home. Historical, lively, and academically-driven – Boston is the place to be. It is filled with diversity of thought, culture, and background. It has the perks of being a large city, yet also somehow feels intimate and homey. Tufts School of Medicine is one of the few medical and research powerhouses in the city, and it attracts students from all over the country. If you are interested in how to get into Tufts Medical School, this post is for you!

This blog post serves as a high-yield resource of facts for Tufts Medical School. We’ll also give tips for getting accepted to Tufts from an accepted applicant. Whether you’re comparing medical schools, preparing for an interview, or wanting to learn more about Tufts, keep reading!

WHY CHOOSE TUFTS MEDICAL SCHOOL?

The most common reasons we’ve heard from students:

Tufts is located in Chinatown, which happens to be one of the poorer neighborhoods in Boston. This provides a unique opportunity to get involved with underserved populations early on in your career.
Tufts is affiliated with over 15 hospitals, which allows students to see not only a diversity of patients, but also how different hospitals run. This is very advantageous for preparing students as they make their journey into residency.
Most of the affiliated hospitals do not even have a residency program. This means that the medical students act as the residents. This gives an unparalleled opportunity to get hands-on clinical experience at an advanced level.
Tufts attracts world-class faculty that are always happy to make mentored relationships with the students.
Wellness is emphasized at Tufts; students boast about how much Tufts cultivates a supportive environment.
The student body is immensely diverse and inclusive.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Applications
Admissions Stats
Pre-Clinical
Clinical Rotations
Housing & Social
Financing
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APPLICATIONS
The Tufts Med School secondary is relatively shorter than most other medical schools. While some students face the brevity with a sigh of relief, other medical school applicants have a hard time writing everything they want to say in a few characters.

How to get into Tufts Medical School
Tufts Medical School Secondary Application Essay Prompts 2020-2021:

Essay 1) Do you wish to include any comments (in addition to those already provided in your AMCAS application) to the Admissions Committee at Tufts University School of Medicine? (Yes or No) If yes, please explain briefly (1000 characters or less).

Essay 2) Please briefly describe your plans for the coming year. Include in this explanation if you will be a student, working, conducting research, volunteering, etc. (1000 characters or less).

Essay 3) Do you consider yourself a person who would contribute to the diversity of the student body of Tufts University School of Medicine? (Yes or No). If yes, please explain briefly (1000 characters or less).

Essay 4) (A new prompt for the 2020-2021 application cycle during the COVID pandemic)

Given how the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the world this year, please contextualize how your experiences have been affected which might include your personal, professional and educational journey. (1000 characters or less).

If you have questions about your Tufts School of Medicine secondary application, email us at [email protected] or contact us.

NEED HELP WITH EDITING YOUR
TUFTS SECONDARY ESSAYS?

Get the Cracking Med School Admissions team’s expertise through our secondary essay editing packages. If you have questions, email us at [email protected] or contact us.

SECONDARY ESSARY EDITING
TUFTS MEDICAL SCHOOL
INTERVIEW FORMAT
Tufts has a traditional, open-file interview format with two interviewers. These may be a combination of students and faculty, usually with one senior student and one faculty member. As these are open-file interviews, the interviewers already know much about you going in. The purpose of these interviews is to expand on your activities and talk about yourself as a person outside of the context of your application.

Admissions & Financial Aid | Tufts University School of Medicine

Want to learn more about how to prepare for your Tufts Medical School interview?

Read our 3 popular medical school interview blog posts here:

How to Prepare for Medical School Interviews
4 Common Medical School Interview Questions and How to Answer Them
How To Answer Tell Me About Yourself and Why Medicine?
The Cracking Med School Admissions team has helped several students get accepted to Tufts School of Medicine and ace their interviews! Make sure to contact us and get our help.

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If you are prepared, the interview gives you the perfect opportunity to standout and shine by sharing with people what you are passionate about.

Med School Admissions Interview Guide eBook Cover
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Year Applying to Med School (e.g. 2020, 2021, etc.)*
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TUFTS MEDICAL SCHOOL ACCEPTANCE RATE
Applied
11,349
Interviewed
845
Accepted
524
Admit Rate
4.6
TUFTS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE ADMISSIONS STATISTICS:
Tufts Medical School Median GPA: 3.73
Tufts Medical School Median MCAT: 515 (129 Chemical and Physical/ 128 Critical Analysis and Reasoning/ 129 Biology and Biochemistry/ 129 Psychology and Sociology)
HOW DID TUFTS MEDICAL SCHOOL STUDENTS DO ON THEIR USMLE STEP EXAMS?
Average Tufts Medical School USMLE Step 1 Score: 229
Average Tufts Medical School USMLE Step 2 Score: 244
Source: U.S. News Graduate School Rankings 2021

5 TUFTS SCHOOL OF MEDICINE APPLICATION TIPS
How to get into Tufts Medical School Tip #1:
Use the traditional, open-file interview as a chance to tell the interviewer something they don’t already know about you. Talk about your passions and hobbies outside of medicine. Try to be comfortable and make it a conversation. I found that my interviewers were very kind. Even if you are asked questions you aren’t expecting, be confident and know that the interviewers want you to succeed.
How to get into Tufts Medical School Tip #2:
Being that Tufts is in an underserved part of Boston, they like to see that you have experience working with these types of populations, or at least have an interest in doing so. This should come across in your application and/or interview.
How to get into Tufts Medical School Tip #3:
Consider how you may contribute to the diversity at Tufts. This is one of the more difficult secondary questions, but really dig deep and find something unique about you. It doesn’t have to be cultural diversity. It can be diversity of interests or thoughts. For example, maybe you are really passionate about art. Think outside of the box.
How to get into Tufts Medical School Tip #4:
Be very familiar with their curriculum, as this is a good talking point in the interview. They just put in place a new, dynamic curriculum that has some interesting features. Read about the curriculum below.
How to get into Tufts Medical School Tip #5:
If you have ties to the location, emphasize that. Boston schools love Boston people. If you do not have ties, that is perfectly fine. But, you should be able to state why you would love to live and do your training in Boston.
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THE INSIDER’S VIEW ON TUFTS MED PRE-CLINICAL YEARS
How to Get Into Tufts Medical School Tip – Know the Curriculum:

Tufts School of Medicine Curriculum: Overview

Tufts has a new curriculum that just began with the class of 2023. It integrates four “threads” that are prevalent throughout the students’ medical career:

1) Healthcare Systems

2) Population Health

3) The Patient Experience

4) Personal and Professional Development

What is unique about Tufts is that rather than having 2 years of pre-clinical curriculum, it is only a year and a half. Beginning in March of the second year, core clerkships already begin.

Pre-clinical curriculum:

The pre-clinical years kick off with a 3-week healthcare systems course, which gives context to why you are doing the work that you’re doing, particularly in underserved areas. Here are some other highlights of the pre-clinical years:

Begins August of year 1 and finishes in January of year 2.
Students gain early clinical experience to solidify the knowledge they learned in the classroom and apply it to real situations.
Foundational science units include biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, and more.
Foundations of Patient Care is a longitudinal curricular element that allows students to learn better how to diagnose and interview patients.
The Competency-based Apprenticeship in Primary Care (CAP) occurs towards the end of year one and provides students with the opportunity to apply their skills in a primary care office.
Foundations of Evidence-based Medicine and Clinical Reasoning is also a longitudinal curricular element that has students engage in small groups to refine their reasoning and diagnostic skills.

Reference: https://medicine.tufts.edu/education/doctor-medicine/curriculum-overview

Combined Degrees
Tufts Medical School offers several combined degree programs, allowing students to branch out and explore other interests. The following are the dual degree programs offered:

MD/MA in International Relations
MD/MBA in Health Management
MD/PhD (Accelerated, 4 years)
MD/PhD
WHAT STUDENTS ARE SAYING ABOUT TUFTS SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
There are a lot of options for housing – from swanky apartments to cheaper apartments. I loved how I was able to see patients from month 1.
My classmates are really fun. Nobody is cut throat during the pre-clinical years, and almost everyone is in one – or multiple – study groups.
I love the location of Tufts – it’s in the middle of Boston, right near Chinatown. You live and serve patients who are extremely diverse. Getting around Boston is extremely walkable and accessible by public transportation!
There are a lot of options for housing – from swanky apartments to cheaper apartments. I loved how I was able to see patients from month 1.
My classmates are really fun. Nobody is cut throat during the pre-clinical years, and almost everyone is in one – or multiple – study groups.
I love the location of Tufts – it’s in the middle of Boston, right near Chinatown. You live and serve patients who are extremely diverse. Getting around Boston is extremely walkable and accessible by public transportation!
There are a lot of options for housing – from swanky apartments to cheaper apartments. I loved how I was able to see patients from month 1.
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THE INSIDER’S VIEW ON TUFTS MEDICAL SCHOOL’S CLINICAL YEARS
Tufts School of Medicine Clinical Curriculum:

About halfway through the second year, core clerkships begin. The following are the required clerkships:

Medicine (8 weeks)
Surgery (8 weeks)
Family Medicine (6 weeks)
OB/GYN (6 weeks)
Pediatrics (6 weeks)
Psychiatry (6 weeks)
The end of year three and continuing through year 4, advanced clinical rotations begin, which include interesting rotations such a clinical neuroscience, and also allow students to take additional electives.

Some other highlights:

Students are allowed to take an extra 8 weeks in addition to the core clerkships to take career exploratory electives. This gives the opportunity to solidify one’s desired specialty.
Intersession periods are one-week sessions where students take a break from their clerkships to return to the classroom, reflect on their experiences, and put everything into context.
Students are required to complete a scholarly project, which is an inquiry-driven project that can be on any research topic, from basic science to population health. There are blocks during years three and four solely dedicated to completing this project.
Tufts has implements a faculty coaching model, which gives students a longitudinal mentor who is there to support their growth and development.
Common clinical rotation sites:

Baystate Medical Center
Carney Hospital
Faulkner Hospital
Good Samaritan Medical Center
Lowell General Hospital
North Shore Medical Center
WHAT STUDENTS ARE SAYING ABOUT CLINICAL ROTATIONS AT TUFTS MED
Advice from a current med student – you will need a car for a lot of your rotations. Some of my rotations are 30-40 minutes away. Some students live in Brookline or the outskirts of Boston their 3rd and 4th years so they can more easily commute and not pay for parking.
I’ve rotated at several community hospitals around Massachusetts. And, I’ve been able to do a good number of my rotations, including one of my sub-internships at Tufts Medical Center.
Tufts School of Medicine has a great combination of community medicine and academic medicine. While many students are involved in all types of research, I feel like I am truly making a difference in the people in my nearby community.
I am able to speak Chinese to many of my patients here. Since I grew up in an Asian-American neighborhood, I feel like I’m practicing very culturally-competent medicine.
Advice from a current med student – you will need a car for a lot of your rotations. Some of my rotations are 30-40 minutes away. Some students live in Brookline or the outskirts of Boston their 3rd and 4th years so they can more easily commute and not pay for parking.
I’ve rotated at several community hospitals around Massachusetts. And, I’ve been able to do a good number of my rotations, including one of my sub-internships at Tufts Medical Center.
Tufts School of Medicine has a great combination of community medicine and academic medicine. While many students are involved in all types of research, I feel like I am truly making a difference in the people in my nearby community.
I am able to speak Chinese to many of my patients here. Since I grew up in an Asian-American neighborhood, I feel like I’m practicing very culturally-competent medicine.
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HOUSING & SOCIAL LIFE
Where do students live?

Students may choose to live on or off campus. Posner Hall is the on-campus dormitory where some students choose to live. Most students, however, opt for off-campus housing. Here is an off-campus housing resource: Off-Campus Housing website

The office of Tufts Medical School housing can be easily reached ([email protected]) and would be happy to assist you in your search for an apartment. It is important to know that housing in Boston is pricey, but living with a roommate may alleviate that cost.

How do students get around?

Driving and parking in Boston can be stressful, so most students (at least in their first and second years) do not bring a car. Depending on where your clinical rotation sites are, having a car during clerkships may be helpful. You may be able to get around with public transit, but public transit does not necessarily reach all of the affiliated hospitals.

Most 3rd and 4th years share cars so they can get to their clinical rotations.

What is the student life like?

Tufts is unique in that its class size is very large (~200 students). This has its pros and cons, but notably, this means that there are so many opportunities to form long-lasting and meaningful relationships with many peers. Tufts Medical School supports a large, compassionate community of academically-driven students who also have a passion for service, arts, and many other interests.

Tufts has instated “learning communities,” which are groups of faculty and students who share facilities in one of the campus buildings. These contain many amenities such as TVs, kitchens, and study spaces. Students congregate here to socialize, study together, or even just relax. Faculty coaches also meet with these students in their learning communities to provide mentorship.

Tufts School of Medicine provides its students with a great fitness center, free of charge to the students. If students wish to take a fitness class, they are able to do so with a small fee.

Tufts students love to get involved in student organizations! One notable organization is the Sharewood Project, which is a student-run free clinic that provides medical care and education. There are so many opportunities to get involved in whatever is of interest to you.

Check out this site for more details: https://medicine.tufts.edu/student-community

FINANCING
While medical school is undoubtedly a large investment, Tufts School of Medicine does what it can to alleviate that financial burden. Many students apply for need-based aid, and most take out loans.

Tuition Medical School Tuition and Fees: ~$65,000
Health Insurance: ~$5,000
Other (housing, living expenses): ~$25,000
Average Indebtedness post-graduation: $222,521
CRACKING MED SCHOOL ADMISSIONS RESOURCES
Here are useful Cracking Med School Admissions resources:

How To Write A Personal Statement For Medical School
Download Cracking Med School Admission’s FREE AMCAS Activities Workbook
Premed Timeline: Planning For Medical School Applications

Our goal is to graduate compassionate and highly-skilled physicians who possess the knowledge, ability, and attitudes to promote the health of individuals and populations. Our students develop advanced skills in clinical reasoning and communication, allowing them to improve the patient experience while delivering the highest quality care. Tufts students cultivate skills in personal reflection, mindfulness, resilience, inquiry, and lifelong learning. Tufts School of Medicine graduates understand the importance of patient-centered outcomes and team-based care. 

MCAT scores are required of all applicants to Tufts University School of Medicine. Tufts currently accepts scores that have been taken within the five (5) calendar years preceding enrollment (i.e., taken after July 1, 2016 for the class matriculating in July 2021); however, preference is given to applicants who have taken the MCAT within three (3) calendar years preceding enrollment (i.e. taken after July 1, 2018 for the class matriculating in July 2021).  Applicants with scores later than three year’s prior to matriculation are encouraged to use the space provided on the TUSM Secondary Application to explain the lapse of time between the exam and their application.  Scores from exams taken by September 2020 are eligible to complete an application in the current cycle. MCAT scores from exams taken after September 2020 are too late to be used to complete an application for the class applying in the 2020-2021 application cycle.

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