UCLA Architecture Undergraduate Acceptance Rate

Last Updated on December 14, 2022 by

When preparing to attend school, one of the most important factors to look out for is the acceptance rate of the school. You should ensure this is taking carefully into consideration. For example, if you wish to attend UCLA, you should consider their acceptance rate. The article below gives you the latest information on UCLA architecture undergraduate acceptance rate, UCLA architecture program acceptance rate, UCLA acceptance rate, UCLA school of arts and architecture acceptance rate, UCLA graduate architecture acceptance rate. You will find up-to-date related articles on UCLA architecture undergraduate acceptance rate right here on Collegelearners.

The UCLA Architecture undergraduate acceptance rate is around 9%. This is a relatively low acceptance rate, but it’s not the lowest in the country. The lowest in the country is the University of Cincinnati at 2.8%, and the next lowest is New York University at 4.4%.

Acceptance rates are important because they help you to understand how many other students will be competing for spots in your program of choice, and how strong your application needs to be in order for you to be accepted.

UCLA school of arts and architecture acceptance rate

UCLA Architecture Undergraduate Acceptance Rate

The UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture (UCLA Arts) is dedicated to training exceptional artists, performers, architects and scholars who are enriched by a global view of the arts and prepared to serve as cultural leaders of the 21st century. Graduate degree programs are offered in the Departments of Architecture and Urban Design, Art, Design | Media Arts, Ethnomusicology, Music, and World Arts and Cultures. The School’s unique curriculum interweaves work in performance, studio and research studies, providing students with a solid creative, artistic and intellectual foundation. World-class faculty provides a depth of expertise and achievement that supports the most ambitious vision a student can bring to the campus. To enrich their coursework students have access to outstanding art collections, exhibitions and performing arts presentations through the School’s internationally acclaimed public arts institutions. The Hammer Museum presents art ranging from Impressionism to Contemporary and the Fowler Museum at UCLA features material culture and art from Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas. UCLA Live, one of the nation’s premiere arts presenters, brings more than 100 leading performers to the campus each year featuring programs of dance, jazz, world music, blues, international theater, spoken word, classical and popular music.

One of America’s leading public research universities, UCLA is also the most multicultural campus in the nation. Situated five miles from the Pacific Ocean and ten miles from downtown Los Angeles, the campus is within a short drive of mountains, beaches, lakes and deserts. The 419-acre campus is a self-contained community replete with restaurants, medical facilities, gyms, botanical and sculpture gardens, movie theaters and concert halls. Students also have access to a wide range of campus services including a career planning center, a nationally recognized library system and a host of professional, social and cultural organizations.

School Philosophy

UCLA Architecture and Urban Design is a champion of ideas and their articulate expression. Our exceptional faculty teach students to engage the world around them, to see ideas as productive forms of response, and to leverage design and writing as expressions of newly curated perspectives. These ideas are grounded in a critical engagement with the history and theory of architecture and the future contingencies of contemporary culture. Through rigorous inquiry, we interrogate contemporary urban issues and propose possible futures with equal measures of expertise, optimism, and vision.

Our vision is to champion and expand the influence of architecture in society. We don’t simply train architects and urban designers; we train educators, scholars, curators, and artists. Our students produce compelling projects and impact culture broadly across the intersecting vectors of design, media, technology and urbanism. Our IDEAS campus is an incubator for collaborative, cross-disciplinary design research. Students and faculty work with partners across entertainment, mobility, technology and urban strategy applying the analytical and design processes of architecture and urban design to emerging developments in these industries. By engaging with experts from other fields, we expand architecture’s field of influence and leverage design to propose alternative, more intelligent futures.

University of California, Los Angeles / School of the Arts and Architecture is located in Los Angeles, CA, in an urban setting.

UCLA Architecture Portfolio Requirements

Departments & Programs

  • Department of Architecture and Urban Design
  • Department of Art
  • Department of Design Media Arts
  • Department of Ethnomusicology
  • Department of Music
  • Department of World Arts and Cultures
UCLA Anthropology

Degrees & Awards

Degrees Offered

DegreeConcentrationSub-concentration
Master of Music (MM)
Master of Architecture (M Arch)
Master of Arts (MA)
Master of Fine Arts (MFA)
Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA)
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Degrees Awarded

DegreeNumber Awarded
Master’s Degrees103
Doctoral Degrees21

Earning Your Degree

Part-time study available?No
Evening/weekend programs available?No
Distance learning programs available?No

Degree Requirements

DegreeRequirement
Master’s DegreesComp Exam Required for some
Thesis Required for some
Doctoral DegreesThesis Required
Oral and written qualifying exams

Admissions

Acceptance Rate

1,711Applied245Accepted100Enrolled14%

Program Requirements for Architecture and Urban Design (Architecture)

tudents are assigned a temporary adviser upon entering the department and select a permanent faculty adviser when they are ready to do so. The faculty member meets with students at least once each quarter and discusses the curriculum, approves selection of courses, and is available for special counseling as needed. Students who wish to change their adviser should obtain the consent of the new faculty adviser and discuss this change with the graduate adviser. The faculty adviser and the staff graduate adviser work together in explaining curricular requirements and in dealing with any personal or academic difficulties that may occur.

Areas of Study

None.

Foreign Language Requirement

None.

Course Requirements

A minimum of 126 units of coursework is required of which at least 114 units must be taken at the graduate level (200 and 400 series). Students must take at least eight units per quarter and may take up to 16 units in a quarter. The remaining 12 units of required coursework may include upper division undergraduate courses but these must be courses offered by departments other than Architecture and Urban Design, or no more than eight units of 596 (independent study) courses that may be taken campuswide.

Required Courses. All students must successfully complete the following courses:

Architecture and Urban Design M201, 220, 291, 401, 403A-403B-403C, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 431, 432, 433, 436, 437, 441, 442, 461, and three courses in Critical Studies in Architectural Culture.

Design Studios. Design studios offered for M.Arch. I students are classified in three levels: introductory (411), intermediate (412, 413, 414), and advanced (401, 403A-403B-403C, 415).

If students maintain at least a B average in these studio levels, they automatically pass from the introductory to the intermediate level, from the intermediate level to the advanced level, and from the advanced level to the comprehensive examination. Students who do not maintain a B average in these studio levels are reviewed by a faculty committee, and are not permitted to advance unless explicitly allowed by that committee.

Waiving Required Courses. Students who believe they can demonstrate that they already have adequate background in topics covered by specific required courses may petition to waive those courses and replace them with electives. However, permission to waive required courses does not, in itself, reduce the minimum number of 126 units required for the M.Arch. I degree, nor does it reduce the nine-quarter residency requirement.

A petition to waive an individual required course should be addressed to the faculty member responsible for that course and may be granted at the faculty member’s discretion, possibly by means of a special examination. The petition should present evidence of adequate background in the specific topic of the course, preferably through a transcript and a syllabus of the course.

Independent Study. Students may apply eight units of 596 coursework toward the elective course requirements for graduation. All independent work with 500-series course numbers must be undertaken with the guidance and approval of a departmental faculty member who evaluates the work on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Course of Study. A normal, three-year path through the curriculum is listed below. Required courses other than design studios are normally only offered once a year, so failure to successfully complete one of these courses at the point shown may lengthen the time required to complete the program. Sections of Architecture and Urban Design 401, required studios, are normally available each quarter. Students are required to take the following courses, in the sequence indicated.

First Year:

  • Fall: Architecture and Urban Design M201, 220, 411, 436.
  • Winter: Architecture and Urban Design 412, 431, elective.
  • Spring: Architecture and Urban Design 413, 432, 442.

Second Year:

  • Fall: Architecture and Urban Design 414, 433, elective.
  • Winter: Architecture and Urban Design 415, 437, elective.
  • Spring: Architecture and Urban Design 401, 441, 461 (or M404).

Third Year:

  • Fall: Architecture and Urban Design 291, 401, 403A, elective.
  • Winter: Architecture and Urban Design 401, 403B, one elective.
  • Spring: Two electives, Architecture and Urban Design 403C.

Architecture M.Arch. I /Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP)

During the first year a student follows the required urban planning curriculum. The second year is entirely in Architecture/Urban Design. The third and fourth years comprise a mix of both Architecture/Urban Design and Urban Planning courses, with the final design or written thesis or client or comprehensive project carried out in the fourth year.

A total of 39 courses (26 four-unit, nine six-unit, and four two-unit courses) or 166 units of coursework is required to graduate. A student will take at least 36 units in Urban Planning and 110 units in Architecture and Urban Design to satisfy the specific requirements of each degree, including core courses in both programs and area of concentration courses from each program. To fulfill the core requirements for the M.A. degree in Urban Planning a student must take six core courses, plus one course related to planning practice or fieldwork. In Architecture and Urban Design a student will take 22 core courses (nine six-unit, nine four-unit, and four two-unit courses). In addition a student will take eight elective courses including three electives in the area of critical studies in architectural culture and five electives that fulfill the needs of the selected area of concentration. These may be chosen from courses offered in Architecture/Urban Design and Urban Planning, which have been identified as acceptable to both programs. To fulfill the comprehensive examination requirement in Architecture and Urban Design, students are required to take Architecture and Urban Design 403A-403B-403C in the fourth year. An additional one or two courses may be needed in the fourth year to meet the Urban Planning thesis/comprehensive examination requirement. Thirty-two units of coursework, or eight elective courses, are double-counted in both Architecture and Urban Design and Urban Planning.

If a student is in the concurrent degree program and decides not to complete either the M.Arch. I degree or the M.A. degree, all the regular requirements for the program that a student wishes to complete must be met.

Teaching Experience

Not required.

Field Experience

Not required.

Comprehensive Examination Plan

All M. Arch.I students must complete the comprehensive examination, a requirement that is satisfied as follows:

The comprehensive examination requirement is fulfilled through the completion of Architecture and Urban Design 403C in Spring Quarter and the final design project for this course. The examination committee consists of at least three faculty members appointed by the department chair. The examination is administered and evaluated for satisfactory performance by the examination committee. The committee evaluates the final design projects in the following terms: pass (a unanimous vote), pass subject to revision of the final design project, or fail (majority vote). No reexaminations are permitted. When the final design project is passed subject to revision, one member of the committee is assigned the responsibility of working with the student on the revision and determining when the final design project has been satisfactorily revised.

Two positive votes from the committee constitute a pass on the comprehensive examination. No reexaminations are permitted. The degree is awarded on recommendation of the faculty committee.

Architecture M.Arch.I /Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.)

Students in the concurrent degree program must meet the thesis/comprehensive examination requirements separately for each department. In Architecture and Urban Design the comprehensive examination requirement is met through Architecture and Urban Design 403A-403B-403C, as outlined above. In Urban Planning, students may fulfill the requirement through (1) a thesis (an original piece of research of publishable length and quality); (2) a client project; or (3) a comprehensive examination. Students are encouraged to choose a topic that integrates planning and policy aspects with design. Two separate comprehensive examination/thesis committees must be formed (one from each department). These two committees must evaluate and vote separately on the two separate comprehensive examinations/theses.

Thesis Plan

None.

Time-to-Degree

The normal length of time for completion of the M.Arch. I degree is nine academic quarters (three years).

Master of Arts

Advising

Students working toward the M.A. degree are assigned a temporary adviser upon entering the school and select a permanent faculty adviser when they are ready to do so. Students who wish to change their adviser should obtain the consent of the new faculty adviser and discuss this change with the staff graduate adviser. The faculty adviser and the staff graduate adviser work together in explaining curricular requirements and in dealing with any personal or academic difficulties that may occur.

There is no formal review process established for students in the M.A. program. Individual faculty advisers make final determinations regarding which courses students are permitted to take, and also approve the decision to begin thesis work.

Students meet with their faculty adviser and with the graduate adviser at least once a quarter. Records are not usually kept in regard to these meetings, unless the end product of a meeting is a written petition or document.

Areas of Study

Students are required to focus their work on a specific academic area or professional issue. Specializations are currently available in critical studies in architectural culture and in technology. In addition, students have the option of the open M.A. degree whereby they structure their own area of interest from the courses offered by the department.

Foreign Language Requirement

None.

Course Requirements

Candidates for the M.A. degree are expected to be in residence at UCLA for two years and undertake six quarters of study. Students must choose and pursue one area of specialization. A thesis is required. When the committee members have signed the thesis proposal, students may sign up for four and no more than eight units of Architecture and Urban Design 598 and begin work on the thesis itself. The course should be taken at some point during the last year of study.

Students are required to complete a minimum of 16 courses (64 units) of graduate or upper division work. At least five (20 units) of these courses must be 200-series courses and at least two (eight units) must be 500-series courses. No more than 20 units of 500-level courses may be counted toward the total unit requirement for the degree. Up to seven courses may be taken from upper division (undergraduate) or graduate courses offered campus wide. Students who choose the area of critical studies in architectural culture as their area of specialization are required to take a total of 30 units of Architecture and Urban Design 290 as part of their requirement for graduation. This set of six five-unit courses must be completed by the end of the sixth quarter of residency.

Students must enroll in at least four and no more than eight units of course 598. Students may also apply 12 units of course 596 toward the unit requirements for graduation. Courses in the 400 series may not be applied toward the graduate course requirement for the M.A. degree, but a limited number may be applied toward elective course requirements.

Teaching Experience

Not required.

Field Experience

Not required.

Comprehensive Examination Plan

None.

Thesis Plan

Every master’s degree thesis plan requires the completion of an approved thesis that demonstrates the student’s ability to perform original, independent research.

All M.A. students must complete a master’s thesis.

Time-to-Degree

The average length of study for the M.A. degree is six academic quarters (two years).

Doctoral Degree

Advising

Students are assigned an adviser at the beginning of the Fall Quarter of their first year. A formal evaluation of the research skills of all students is carried out no earlier than the second quarter of residence, and no later than the fourth quarter. Student progress is reviewed annually by the Ph.D. Program Committee.

Continuing students may petition to transfer from the M.A. to the Ph.D. program before completion of the M.A. thesis, but approval is granted only in exceptional cases. The student should consult the primary adviser to determine the feasibility of transfer from one degree program to another. If the primary adviser so recommends, an M.A. student may petition the Ph.D. Program Committee at the end of the fourth quarter. The request must be accompanied by a current transcript, a research sample, a research proposal, and a short written report by the primary adviser. Based on these materials the Ph.D. Program Committee recommends one of the following: a) immediate admission into the Ph.D. program; b) completion of a thesis leading to an M.A. degree and the option thereafter to apply separately for admission into the Ph.D. program; or c) that the student takes a terminal M.A. degree.

Major Fields or Subdisciplines

Major Field

Students are required to undertake a program of study that includes one major area, either critical studies in architectural culture or in technology.

Majors outside these areas, or a combination of the two, may be undertaken, subject to the approval of the Ph.D. Program Committee, if supported by qualified departmental faculty members who are available and willing to provide the necessary instruction and guidance.

Each major field is organized and coordinated by a major field committee consisting of faculty and students with active interests in that area. It is the responsibility of the field committee to initiate research programs, organize discussions, make curriculum and staffing recommendations, and serve as a source of consultation, guidance, and stimulation for the student.

Minor Field

Students are required to include in the program of study at least one minor field which must be chosen from outside of the department. The objectives of the minor field requirement are to ensure that Ph.D. students have academic breadth in their preparation, and to encourage them to participate in the general intellectual life of the University. In planning minor field work, students are advised in accord with these objectives, and the choice must be approved by the adviser.

Due to the wide diversity of backgrounds of Ph.D. students in architecture, it is appropriate to allow some flexibility in requirements for completion of the minor. The normal method of  demonstrating competence in the minor field is to complete at least 16 units of coursework, with a grade of B or better, which represents a unified course of study in that field. If a qualified departmental faculty member is willing to provide the necessary supervision, the Ph.D. Program Committee, in consultation with that faculty member and the student, may accept an alternative method of completing this requirement; for example, a substantial research project. Any proposal to complete the minor by an alternative method must explicitly demonstrate, to the satisfaction of the Ph.D. Program Committee, that the objectives of the minor field requirement are met.

Foreign Language Requirement

Students are expected to develop adequate skills in one foreign language as appropriate to their field of specialization, and as approved by the Ph.D. Program Committee, and are strongly advised to complete this requirement as early as possible. Students may fulfill the foreign language requirement in French, German, or Italian by completing, with grades of B or better, coursework in the approved language to level 4, or by passing the equivalent placement examination in the appropriate foreign language department. The student’s doctoral adviser or the Ph.D. Program Committee may recommend that other languages be taken if needed for the student’s research.

Courses applied toward satisfaction of the language requirement may not be applied toward satisfaction of a major or minor field requirement.

Course Requirements

Students must be in residence in the Ph.D. program a minimum of two years. This is an absolute minimum; longer residence requirements apply to most students, as detailed below. In general, students are required to take sufficient coursework to provide adequate preparation for the qualifying examinations and the dissertation. Minimum course unit requirements are as follows:

All candidates are required to complete six quarters in residence and 72 units of coursework. For these required 72 units, at least 50 percent must be in courses in architecture and urban design.  Students are required to maintain an overall grade-point average of 3.0 or better in all courses. The Ph.D. is an academic degree and therefore it is expected that a substantial proportion of the coursework will be completed in the 200 series; the minimum requirement is for at least 32 units of coursework to be in 200 series. No more than eight units of Architecture and Urban Design 596 and eight units of 597 may be applied toward degree requirements; as many units of 599 as necessary may be applied. Students who choose the area of critical studies in architectural culture as their area of specialization are required to take a total of 30 units of Architecture and Urban Design 290 as part of their requirement for graduation. This set of six five-unit courses must be completed by the end of the sixth quarter of residency. Ph.D. students with no prior background in architecture are strongly recommended to take a summer studio course at UCLA.

Students who hold a professional degree in architecture before admission to the program are required to complete four quarters in residence and 48 units of coursework in order to establish eligibility to take the qualifying examinations.

Students who hold an M.Arch. I, M.Arch. II, or M.A. degree in Architecture and Urban Design from the department may petition the Ph.D. Program Committee to reduce these course requirements to a minimum of three quarters in residence and 36 units of coursework. Decisions on these petitions are at the discretion of the committee.

Teaching Experience

Not required.

Written and Oral Qualifying Examinations

Academic Senate regulations require all doctoral students to complete and pass University written and oral qualifying examinations prior to doctoral advancement to candidacy. Also, under Senate regulations the University oral qualifying examination is open only to the student and appointed members of the doctoral committee. In addition to University requirements, some graduate programs have other pre-candidacy examination requirements. What follows in this section is how students are required to fulfill all of these requirements for this doctoral program.

Students may take the two qualifying examinations after successful completion of:

  1. The first-year review evaluating research skills;
  2. The mathematics, computing, or foreign language requirement; and
  3. The coursework requirements, as detailed above. The committee application includes an outline and brief discussion of the proposed dissertation.

The purpose of the qualifying examinations is for students to demonstrate a broad mastery of the field of architecture, the required levels of competence in the major and minor fields, and the appropriateness of and adequate preparation for the proposed dissertation topic. The examinations consist of the following parts:

1. The written and oral examination in the major field.

The written examination in the major field is a substantial exercise that is followed by an oral presentation to the examination committee. The standard for successful completion of this examination is for students to demonstrate that they have achieved the level of competence of a scholar specializing in the field, could teach an introductory course in the field, and can contribute to the progress of the field through scholarship and research.

The major field examination is conducted by a three-member examination committee appointed by the chair of the department on the advice of the Ph.D. Program Committee. The examination committee consists of faculty with regular appointments who also will serve as the inside members of the doctoral committee.

A student will fail the oral examination in the major field if more than one committee member votes not passed, regardless of the size of the committee. If a majority of the examining committee so recommends, the examination in the major field may be repeated once within an established time frame. Students may not replace more than one original committee member with a new member in the reconstituted committee. Students who do not meet these requirements within the time frame will be recommended for termination.

2. The University Oral Qualifying Examination which focuses primarily on the subject of the proposed dissertation.

The University Oral Qualifying Examination is conducted by the appointed doctoral committee and explores the proposed dissertation topic and the ability to undertake the proposed work successfully.

Advancement to Candidacy

Students are advanced to candidacy upon successful completion of the written and oral qualifying examinations.

Doctoral Dissertation

Every doctoral degree program requires the completion of an approved dissertation that demonstrates the student’s ability to perform original, independent research and constitutes a distinct contribution to knowledge in the principal field of study.

Final Oral Examination (Defense of Dissertation)

Not required for all students in the program. The decision as to whether a defense is required is made by the doctoral committee.

Time-to-Degree

Students are expected to receive their degree within six years (18 quarters) from admission into the program, and must be registered continuously or on official leave of absence during this period. Students who do not register and are not on official leave automatically lose their status in the program.

Termination of Graduate Study and Appeal of Termination

University Policy

A student who fails to meet the above requirements may be recommended for termination of graduate study. A graduate student may be disqualified from continuing in the graduate program for a variety of reasons. The most common is failure to maintain the minimum cumulative grade point average (3.00) required by the Academic Senate to remain in good standing (some programs require a higher grade point average). Other examples include failure of examinations, lack of timely progress toward the degree and poor performance in core courses. Probationary students (those with cumulative grade point averages below 3.00) are subject to immediate dismissal upon the recommendation of their department. University guidelines governing termination of graduate students, including the appeal procedure, are outlined in Standards and Procedures for Graduate Study at UCLA.

Special Departmental or Program Policy

Academic Probation for M.Arch. I Students

In addition to University policy, M.Arch. I students are required to maintain a 3.00 average in studio coursework. Students who fall below a 3.00 average in overall coursework or below a 3.00 average in studio coursework are placed on departmental academic probation. Students on academic probation are required to attend bi-weekly meetings with their faculty adviser and the graduate adviser and are required to be assigned a student mentor. Students are free to choose their own faculty adviser with the consent of the graduate adviser. The department wants all students to succeed and indeed to excel in all of their academic endeavors.  Therefore, academic probation is intended to identify weaknesses and help students move forward through special support and remedial action.

Recommendations for Termination for M.Arch. I Students

Students whose overall grade-point average or grade-point average in studio coursework falls below 3.00 in two consecutive quarters are subject to a review to determine whether they will be recommended for termination of graduate study to the Graduate Division. No student will be subject to such a recommendation on the basis of a single grade of B- in a studio course.

At the beginning of each academic year, the department’s Executive Committee selects a standing committee charged with reviewing all students subject to a recommendation for termination. The members of the standing committee serve in this capacity for a minimum of one academic year. The standing committee consists of three ladder faculty members: the department chair and two other ladder faculty members. A student’s individual faculty adviser may serve as an additional member and consultant to the standing committee.

Once a potential recommendation for termination arises, the following procedures begin. Students receive additional academic advising and documentation of this advising, in the form of reports from the staff graduate adviser and the student’s individual faculty adviser, that are placed in the student’s file. Students meet with the standing committee at least once during the process and in addition to their faculty adviser, they may invite other faculty members to attend their meeting(s). The standing committee makes their recommendations in writing. If the committee chooses not to recommend termination, they must provide the student with a clear timetable for required improvements in performance. Students who fail to meet these requirements are recommended for termination based on a majority vote of the standing committee.

UCLA Architecture and Urban Design and LAUSD to Award Summer Scholarships  to Twenty Students from Design-Focused STEM High Schools | University of  California, Los Angeles (UCLA) | Archinect

The UCLA Architecture Undergraduate Acceptance Rate is the percentage of applicants accepted to the program. For the 2017-2018 academic year, the rate was 25%. This means that of all applicants, one out of every four students was accepted into the program.

The total number of applicants for Architecture during this period was 2,615. This means that there were approximately 1,152 students who were not accepted into this specific program. The remaining 1,463 students were accepted into their first choice school or another school on their list.

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