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What Are The Worst Medical Schools

Last Updated on November 13, 2022 by Omoyeni Adeniyi

The worst medical schools are the ones that do not care about you. They just want to make as much money from you as possible, and don’t really give a damn about your future as a doctor.

Collegelearners affords a plethora of information on safest medical schools, easiest private medical schools to get into, university school of medicine and so much more. Ensure you peruse through our catalogue for relevant information on similar topics.

Worst Medical Schools in the World

Least Competitive Schools Get More ApplicationsThere are many reasons for this. Remember, these schools are getting thousands of applications. In fact, the schools that are traditionally viewed as the “least competitive” or “safety schools” tend to get way more applications than a Harvard or Stanford. George Washington University for example (a great school anyway you slice it), gets over 10,000 applications. Same with Drexel Medical. The reason these schools get so many applications is that they publish lower MCAT and GPA scores, so applicants get excited and apply both as safety schools (for this with great stats) and as target schools (for those with lower stats). 

So with these schools getting thousands upon thousands of applications, they end up actually having a lower acceptance rate and are actually quite competitive. 

One important factor to remember is that just because your average GPA and MCAT is right on target for a given medical school, that does not mean you will get in, or even be competitive. If a school publishes their average MCAT as a 29, and average GPA as a 3.7, realize that they are rejecting far more candidates with those numbers than they are accepting. There may be over 4000 candidates with a 29 or above applying to their school, but they are only accepting a tiny fraction of those. So just because your average MCAT and GPA is aligned with a particular medical school you cannot be assured of getting in.

Also, keep in mind that those medical schools with lower GPA and MCAT requirements are often state schools with heavy state preferences for their applicants.

List of Private Medical Schools with Lowest Average MCAT & GPA

The question remains though, which are the least competitive medical schools? We like to rephrase that question and say which are the medical schools with the lowest average MCAT and GPA.

Keep in mind, all these schools are still great, but here is a small list of private medical schools (see the note above about state schools) which applicants with lower GPAs and MCATs should consider applying to.

There are more, but this is a basic list. Please keep in mind, each of these schools is exceptional and you will become a great doctor from any of them. Also remember that just because they look at applicants with lower GPAs and MCATs than other medical schools in the country, they are no less competitive.Schedule a Free Admissions Advising Consultation

Least Competitive Medical Schools in 2019

  • San Juan Bautista School of Medicine
  • Ponce School of Medicine and Health Sciences
  • Universidad Central del Caribe School of Medicine
  • Meharry Medical College
  • Howard University College of Medicine
  • Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine
  • University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine
  • Louisiana State University School of Medicine in Shreveport
  • University of Mississippi School of Medicine
  • Mercer University School of Medicine
    Morehouse School of Medicine
  • Northeast Ohio Medical University
  • University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine
  • Florida State University College of Medicine
  • Brody School of Medicine East Carolina
  • University of New Mexico School of Medicine
  • Michigan State University College of Human Medicine
  • University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences
  • University of Arizona College of Medicine
  • University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine
    Southern Illinois
  • University School of Medicine
  • Washington State University Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine
  • University of Kentucky College of Medicine
  • Central Michigan University College of Medicine
  • Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine
  • Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences F. Edward
  • Hebert School of Medicine
  • University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Medicine
  • University of Nevada School of Medicine- Las Vegas
  • University of South Alabama College of Medicine
  • University of Louisville School of Medicine
  • Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine

Looking for help getting into a great medical school? MedSchoolCoach has helped more 15,000 students achieve their med school dreams! Contact us today for a free admissions advising consultation. 

safest medical schools

What are the least competitive medical schools in the country? This is a question we at MedSchoolCoach get all the time. Let’s take it one step at a time. 

Average GPA & MCAT Scores Don’t Tell the Whole Story 

First, there is no really uncompetitive US MD medical school. Getting into any US medical school is a huge accomplishment. Even the “worst” schools have acceptance rates under 20%. So to peg a school as noncompetitive is incorrect. 

Now, there are some schools that have lower average GPAs and MCAT scores than others obviously, and this is typically what applicants refer to as the least competitive medical schools. Unfortunately, this does not really hold true. There are a lot of schools that applicants apply to with an average GPA and MCAT lower than theirs, but never get interviews at. 

Least Competitive Schools Get More Applications

There are many reasons for this. Remember, these schools are getting thousands of applications. In fact, the schools that are traditionally viewed as the “least competitive” or “safety schools” tend to get way more applications than a Harvard or Stanford. George Washington University for example (a great school anyway you slice it), gets over 10,000 applications. Same with Drexel Medical. The reason these schools get so many applications is that they publish lower MCAT and GPA scores, so applicants get excited and apply both as safety schools (for this with great stats) and as target schools (for those with lower stats). 


So with these schools getting thousands upon thousands of applications, they end up actually having a lower acceptance rate and are actually quite competitive.

One important factor to remember is that just because your average GPA and MCAT is right on target for a given medical school, that does not mean you will get in, or even be competitive. If a school publishes their average MCAT as a 29, and average GPA as a 3.7, realize that they are rejecting far more candidates with those numbers than they are accepting. There may be over 4000 candidates with a 29 or above applying to their school, but they are only accepting a tiny fraction of those. So just because your average MCAT and GPA is aligned with a particular medical school you cannot be assured of getting in.

Also, keep in mind that those medical schools with lower GPA and MCAT requirements are often state schools with heavy state preferences for their applicants.

A medical school application consultant can be really helpful for choosing the right school.

List of Private Medical Schools with Lowest Average MCAT & GPA

The question remains though, which are the least competitive medical schools? We like to rephrase that question and say which are the medical schools with the lowest average MCAT and GPA.

Keep in mind, all these schools are still great, but here is a small list of private medical schools (see the note above about state schools) which applicants with lower GPAs and MCATs should consider applying to.

There are more, but this is a basic list. Please keep in mind, each of these schools is exceptional and you will become a great doctor from any of them. Also remember that just because they look at applicants with lower GPAs and MCATs than other medical schools in the country, they are no less competitive.

worst do schools

Your heart is set on becoming a physician. You’re taking medical school prerequisites and working on your extracurricular requirements. But as you start compiling your med school list, you’re intrigued by osteopathic medical schools, or DO programs. You begin to wonder, should you apply to DO programs? And if so, which ones?

We’ve devoted an entire guide to the differences between MD and DO programs, so we won’t spend too much time comparing the merits of each degree here. But we will help you determine if a DO program is the right fit for you.

Maybe you’re considering DO programs for the first time and don’t know where to start. Or perhaps you already know you want to go into osteopathic medicine, but you’re not sure which programs to apply to and how to make yourself a competitive applicant. 

To help you reach the next stage in your medical journey, in this article we’ve provided:

  • A discussion of who should apply to DO programs
  • Admissions strategies you can use to improve your odds of getting accepted to these competitive programs
  • A list of the best osteopathic medical schools

Part 2: Who should consider osteopathic medical schools?

Osteopathic medical schools attract promising applicants every year because they teach a holistic approach to medicine. For many students, the specialized focuses on prevention, the body’s ability to heal itself, and the patient as a whole are exactly what they’re looking for in their medical training. 

The majority of osteopathic med school graduates become primary care physicians in rural areas, even though DO physicians have the same opportunities to specialize as MD physicians do. This is because the philosophy of osteopathic medicine is most applicable to a primary care practice. 

But not every DO physician becomes a rural primary care doctor, so even if that’s not your career goal, an osteopathic medical school could still be a good choice for you.

Bear in mind, however, that when it comes to the most competitive medical specialties, DO graduates have a harder time matching into residencies than their MD counterparts. While overall match rates are fairly close (89.1 percent for DO seniors vs. 92.8 percent for MD seniors in 2021), a significantly higher percentage of DO grads go into primary care. In 2021, over half of DO seniors who matched wound up in a primary care specialty vs. around one-third of MD seniors.

One of the most distinguishing factors of DO physicians is that they receive 200 hours of specialized osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). This is a set of techniques used to treat and prevent illness or injury by stretching and applying pressure to patients’ muscles and joints. In practice, OMT can seem similar to chiropractic techniques, but instead of just fixing a patient’s alignment, OMT also treats health problems like asthma, migraines, and sinus disorders, to name a few. In some cases, OMT works as a replacement for drugs or surgery. This treatment method attracts many students to osteopathic medical schools because they’re interested in exploring more natural, holistic approaches to healing.

Holistic medicine takes a big-picture approach by looking beyond the diagnosis and treatment of disease. If you’re passionate about improving community health and preventing disease, a DO program will provide the training to help you pursue those aims in your medical career.

Beyond the emphasis on holistic medicine, osteopathic medical schools appeal to premed students with low stats because they have a better chance of getting accepted to a DO program than an MD program (more on this later). So if your stats aren’t quite competitive enough for allopathic medical schools, applying to DO programs gives you an option to continue pursuing a medical degree instead of taking a gap year to enroll in a post-bacc or retaking the MCAT to improve your stats before reapplying.

However, an osteopathic medical school might not be a great fit for you if you’ve dreamed of attending a medical program attached to a prestigious university or a large medical center. Because many DO programs are aimed at training rural primary care physicians, they’re located in the midst of the rural communities their graduates are meant to serve. You’ll spend more of your clinical rotations in community clinics than acclaimed hospitals. And you won’t find DO programs attached to Ivies or highly selective undergraduate institutions. 

That doesn’t mean osteopathic medical schools offer inferior training or produce second-rate physicians. As we’ve mentioned, the approach to medicine is different—not better or worse. But if the name or prestige of your medical school is a key factor in which program you decide to pursue, you’re better off looking at top-ranked MD programs.

It’s important to note that many premed students apply to both allopathic and osteopathic medical schools. So if you’re still not sure if an MD or DO program would be better for you, we’d suggest you apply to a mix of both. 

Part 3: Osteopathic medical school admissions strategies

In this section, we’ll explore the admissions strategies—beyond having competitive stats—that will help you increase your chances of getting accepted to a DO program.

Demonstrate interest for holistic medicine through your extracurriculars

DO programs require the same medical school extracurricular activities that MD programs do, including shadowing, research, volunteering, and patient experience. But to be an impressive candidate, you need to convince admissions committees that you’re truly interested in osteopathic medicine—not just looking for an easier route to becoming a physician because you have less competitive stats.

You can demonstrate your passion for holistic medicine while fulfilling your volunteer and community service requirements. You might volunteer to teach healthy living or nutrition classes at your local library. If you have your heart set on pediatrics, become a volunteer at an after-school physical activity program. Look for other opportunities in your community to be a health advocate or spread information about healthy lifestyles and prevention.

If possible, arrange your patient experience to take place in a holistic health clinic where you can witness holistic medicine in action. But you can apply a holistic approach to any clinical experience you gain—look beyond easing symptoms and consider how to improve patients’ overall health through better healthy living practices.

Osteopathic medical schools may not prioritize research experience as highly as MD programs, but they still expect to see that you’ve spent time in a lab. This will demonstrate your ability to understand and incorporate research findings into your practice as a DO physician. You’ll get bonus points if your research focus is related to an aspect of holistic medicine or OMT.

And don’t worry if you’re applying to both allopathic and osteopathic medical schools. Weaving a holistic medicine approach through your extracurriculars will look good on MD program applications, too. Many MD physicians apply holistic principles to their practices. As long as it’s your authentic interest, you’ll impress adcoms across the board with your holistic medicine experience.

Obtain a strong letter of recommendation from a DO physician

Some osteopathic medical schools specifically require applicants to submit a letter of recommendation from a practicing DO physician. This is another way DO programs screen applicants to see if they have a true understanding of and interest in osteopathic medicine. 

Shadowing a DO physician is the best way for you to obtain a strong letter of recommendation. And, you get to see how an osteopathic doctor treats patients, which will help you determine if you’re compatible with a holistic medical approach. If you have the time and ability, you could shadow both a DO and an MD physician to compare the differences in their day-to-day medical practices and see which appeals to you more.

How do you find a DO physician to shadow? Start by seeing if your own primary care doctor is a DO physician. If not, perhaps they can recommend you to a colleague or another doctor in their practice. You can also use an online directory of Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine to find potential physicians to shadow.

Express your passion for osteopathic medicine in your personal statement

Your med school personal statement—whether you apply to osteopathic medical school, allopathic, or both—should include your reasons for pursuing medicine, the experiences that led you to a medical career, and evidence for why you’ll be a successful physician. We offer an in-depth look at crafting your statement in our guide to writing medical school personal statements.

Since many students apply to both MD and DO programs, it’s tempting to use the same personal statement for both applications. And, certainly, using the same anecdotes or theme is a smart way to save you time and effort. But be careful about just adding “holistic” throughout your MD personal statement in an attempt to demonstrate your interest in osteopathic medicine—adcoms will see right through you.

Osteopathic medical schools want to see your interest in becoming an osteopathic doctor specifically, not just that you’re applying because DO programs are easier to get accepted to than MD programs. If you’ve committed to the above strategies of gaining holistic and osteopathic medical exposure, you’ll have plenty of meaningful experiences to pull from when writing your statement. 

Craft an authentic statement focusing on the aspects of holistic medicine that appeal most strongly to you, whether that’s OMT, prevention, or treating the patient as a whole. Use anecdotes to demonstrate your exploration of and commitment to osteopathic medicine.

Part 4: The best DO schools: rankings and admissions statistics

To help you identify which DO programs you should apply to, we compiled a list of the best osteopathic medical schools and their important admissions data.

As previously mentioned, students accepted to osteopathic med schools have lower stats than students who enter allopathic medical schools. To compare, among the 2020 entering class, the average GPA and MCAT for DO program matriculants were 3.54 and 504.3, while the averages of students enrolling in MD programs were 3.73 and 511.5.

It might surprise you that osteopathic medical schools as a whole have a lower matriculation rate—in 2020, 36 percent of osteopathic applicants eventually matriculated vs. 42 percent of allopathic applicants. This is because there are only 38 accredited DO programs, compared to the 150+ MD programs available. With far fewer DO seats available, the competition is still fierce to get accepted, so you’ve got to make yourself a competitive applicant. 

And just because the class profiles of DO programs are a little lower than MD programs, don’t think osteopathic medical schools are of lower quality. Of the 38 DO programs, 15 landed in the top 124 medical schools ranked by U.S. News & World Report according to research reputation. So if you want to become a DO physician, you have many respected programs to choose from.

Below, you’ll find the 2023 U.S. News rankings, plus relevant statistics, for the best DO schools.

Osteopathic Medical SchoolsU.S. News Research RankingCityStateYear Est.Annual Tuition & FeesAvg. GPAAvg. MCATAcceptance RateFirst-Year Class Size
Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine95–124BlacksburgVA2001$47,8003.750213.2%185 (65% IS)
Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine95–124EriePA1992$37,0003.505035.2%381 (21% IS)
Lincoln Memorial University DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine95–124HarrogateTN2007$53,7003.450117.6%393 (25% IS)
Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine95–124IndianapolisIN2013$55,3003.655045.5%156 (57% IS)
Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine*95–124East LansingMI1969$46,928 IS
$65,325 OOS
3.5–3.7506–5087%300 (67% IS)
Nova Southeastern University Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine95–124Fort LauderdaleFL1979$56,7843.650413.1%410 (65% IS)
Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine*95–124AthensOH1975$37,068 IS
$52,864 OOS
3.685046.9%255 (93% IS)
Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine*95–124StratfordNJ1976$41,339 IS
$66,324 OOS
3.575056.2%219 (86% IS)
Touro University California College of Osteopathic Medicine95–124VallejoCA1997$59,6103.565096.7%125 (81% IS)
University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine95–124BiddefordME1978$60,0403.575048.2%178 (10% IS)
University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth College of Osteopathic Medicine*95–124Fort WorthTX1970$13,078 IS
$28,766 OOS
3.715078.4%237 (93% IS)
University of Pikeville Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine95–124PikevilleKY1997$50,0003.550011.6%132 (97% IS)
Western University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific95–124PomonaCA1977$60,7503.65508NR336 (74% IS)
West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine*95–124LewisburgWV1974$21,472 IS
$52,710 OOS
3.5450211%207 (20% IS)
William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine95–124HattiesburgMS2009$44,0003.450013.1%158 (13% IS)

Best Medical Schools

The recently released QS World University Rankings by Subject 2020 features 600 of the top higher education institutions to study medicine.

The QS University Rankings by Subject are based on four indicators: academic reputation, employer reputation, research citations per paper and the H-index (a way of measuring the productivity and published work of a scientist or scholar). You can find more details about the methodology behind the subject rankings here.

Top 10 Universities for Medical Schools in the WorldBased on the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2020
RankName of InstitutionLocation
1Harvard UniversityUnited States
2University of OxfordUnited Kingdom
3University of CambridgeUnited Kingdom
4Stanford UniversityUnited States
5=Johns Hopkins UniversityUnited States
5=Karolinska InstitutetSweden
7University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)United States
8UCL (University College London)United Kingdom
9Yale UniversityUnited States
10=Imperial College LondonUnited Kingdom
10=University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)United States 


Top universities for medicine in the US and Canada

111 of the world’s best medical schools are found in the United States, with five of these making it into the worldwide top ten. Harvard University offers the world’s best medicine program for the fifth consecutive year, achieving a perfect score for employer reputation. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is the global medical research leader, despite dropping out of the top ten this year, with a perfect score in the research citations per paper indicator.  

Canada has 18 medical schools in the rankings this year, with top scoring university, the University of Toronto in joint 13th place and earning its highest score in the H-Index indicator. Also in the world top 50 in Canada are McGill University (joint 21st), University of British Columbia (joint 28th) and McMaster University (45th).

Easiest Medical Schools to Get Into

Medical school is expensive and time-consuming. The AAMC reports that the average medical student graduated with around $207,000 in debt in 2020. Medical students usually finish school in about four full-time years.

New physicians receive supervised training in their medical specialty during residency, which lasts 3-8 years. Residency is often followed by a 1- to 3-year fellowship.

This guide explains what it takes to get into medical school. We also provide a ranked list of the easiest medical schools to get into to help you decide where to apply.

What Are the Admission Requirements for Medical School?

Low acceptance rates make getting into medical school extremely difficult. Even the easiest medical schools to get into only admit highly qualified applicants. Getting into medical school is much more challenging than gaining admission to most other undergraduate and graduate programs.

Medical school admission requirements vary but usually include a minimum undergraduate GPA, completion of prerequisite courses, letters of recommendation, and minimum test scores. Medical schools also look for extracurricular, volunteer, research, and clinical experience.

Education

All medical school applicants need a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college, but each institution chooses its own pre-med course prerequisites. Applicants usually need one year of biology, two years of chemistry, and one year of English, according to the AAMC.

Medical school admission requirements sometimes include competency-based exams instead of specific courses. Others require lab, volunteer, or shadowing experience.

Many undergraduate students major in a biological science field to increase their chances of getting into medical school. However, medical schools consider all applicants who complete the required prerequisites equally, regardless of their major.

Extracurriculars

Applicants may improve their chances of getting into medical school by participating in extracurricular activities. Although not typically a requirement, participation in extracurricular activities can be a window into an applicant’s personality and values.

Medical schools want empathetic, ethical students with leadership, interpersonal, and communication skills. The way you choose to spend your time outside of class can help admissions committees better understand who you are and what you care about.

Extracurricular activities can also be an excellent way to get clinical, research, or volunteer experience.

Letters of Recommendation

Medical school admissions committees usually require letters of recommendation. Students should ask for letters of recommendation from undergraduate professors, pre-med advisors, or the pre-med office at their school. Choose someone who can speak to your strengths.

GPA

Medical schools require applicants to maintain a high undergraduate GPA. Schools consider overall GPA, science GPA, and non-science GPA. Each institution decides how much weight to give each type of GPA. According to the Princeton Review, medical school enrollees held an average overall GPA of 3.71 in 2017-2018.

The easiest medical schools to get into may have lower minimum GPA requirements than the more competitive institutions.

MCAT Scores

Applicants must take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), a standardized test that indicates their preparedness for medical school. The MCAT asks questions geared toward determining students’ scientific knowledge and analytical skills. MCAT prep books can help students study for the exam.

According to the American Medical Association, the average MCAT score for students who attended medical school in 2018-2019 was 511.2.

CASPer Test

The Computer-based Assessment for Sampling Personal Characteristics (CASPer) is a situational judgment test many medical schools use to evaluate applicants. The exam assesses traits that physicians should possess in order to be successful. These include collaboration, communication, empathy, and equity. Not all medical schools require the CASPer test.

Application

Most medical schools in the U.S. accept first-year applications through the Association of American Medical Colleges’s American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS). Using AMCAS lets students apply to multiple programs by filling out just one primary application.

After submitting a primary application, applicants also complete secondary applications for each medical school they are applying to. In these secondary applications, students can specify why they are interested in the specific schools.

AMCAS collects all of the application information students submit and passes it on to each school.

Tips for Getting Into Medical School

Get Medical Experience on Your Resume

Improve your chances of getting into medical school by gaining medical experience to put on your resume. Although not a prerequisite, getting medical experience shows admissions committees that you are serious about pursuing a career in medicine.

Participate in Research Projects

Undergraduate research experience is essential for applicants interested in a career in medical research or academic medicine. Research experience can help you differentiate yourself from applicants without it.

Volunteer

Volunteering to help others in your community demonstrates character and integrity, both important traits for those who pursue careers in medicine. Applicants can volunteer to gain experience in medical settings and determine their career goals.

Choose a Major You Will Excel In

Prospective doctors do not need to major in biological science in order to gain acceptance to medical school. Medical school admissions committees recommend students choose an undergraduate major they genuinely enjoy and can do well in. No matter what major you choose, the American Academy of Family Physicians recommends you enroll in biology, math, chemistry, and English courses.

Apply to Multiple Schools

Applying to more than one school can increase your chances of acceptance. But, make sure to only apply to medical schools where you meet the admission criteria.

Study Early and Often for the MCAT

Although medical schools consider a prospective student’s entire application, MCAT scores are critical. Familiarize yourself with everything the MCAT test will cover, and then plan a study schedule. Many students take practice tests to track their progress.

Don’t Skimp on Extracurricular Activities

Medical school admissions committees often prefer applicants with extracurricular activities on their resumes. Students who participate in a variety of activities while maintaining high GPAs demonstrate good time management skills and a strong work ethic.

Be Ready to Explain Why You Want to Be a Doctor

Students with clear, compelling explanations for why they want to become physicians can increase their chances of getting into medical school. Many programs require applicants to submit a personal statement. Try to write a unique, honest essay that the admissions committee will remember.

How Do I Choose a Medical School?

Academic Focus

Consider each medical school’s academic focus and whether it aligns with your career goals and interests. Schools may concentrate in areas like research, primary care, or specialty medicine. For example, students who want to practice emergency medicine can benefit from choosing a medical school with a strong focus on this specialty.

Admissions Criteria

Applying to medical schools where you do not meet the admissions criteria is often a waste of time, money, and effort. Research specific requirements for each institution before beginning the application process. The easiest medical schools to get into usually have less stringent admissions criteria.

Cost

Going to medical school is not cheap. According to the AAMC, medical students paid an average tuition of $33,490 for one year at an in-state, public university in 2021-2022. Attending a public medical school where you can pay in-state tuition is typically more affordable than medical school at a private or out-of-state institution.

Location

Students should consider location when choosing a medical school. Where you go to school can drastically impact your cost of tuition. For example, attending an in-state, public school is usually more affordable than attending an out-of-state or private medical school. Where you study also impacts the clinical and research experiences available to you.

Accreditation

Accreditation is a process by which schools demonstrate that they meet minimum educational standards. In the U.S., even the easiest medical schools to get into must be accredited.

Look for MD-granting medical school programs accredited by the AAMC’s Liaison Committee on Medical Education. Medical schools that offer doctor of osteopathic medicine (DO) degrees must hold accreditation from the Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation at the American Osteopathic Association.

  1. University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health SciencesLOCATIONGrand Forks, North DakotaView School ProfileThe University of North Dakota’s School of Medicine & Health Sciences offers eight healthcare programs, including the state’s only four-year MD program. The oldest university in North Dakota, UND partners with clinical facilities throughout the state where students can train after their second year.UND accepts about 28% of medical school applicants, making it one of the easiest medical schools to get into. The university strives to offer educational opportunities for American Indian students by committing to accepting a certain percentage of qualifying applicants each year.Prospective students must submit MCAT scores, letters of recommendation, and an experiences and attributes portfolio. The admissions department does not require a minimum MCAT score, but all applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.0. The average accepted applicant in 2019 had a 507 MCAT score and a 3.5 GPA.
  2. University of Massachusetts Medical SchoolLOCATIONWorcester, MassachusettsView School ProfileThe University of Massachusetts Medical School — located in Worcester — offers training in several medical disciplines, but emphasizes primary care specialties. The school offers MD and MD/Ph.D. programs to both in-state and out-of-state residents.UMMS partners with two acute care hospitals and maintains affiliations with several community hospitals and health centers in the region. Students typically complete clinical requirements at one of these locations.UMMS accepts 23% of applicants. All prospective students must hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and submit MCAT scores and letters of recommendation. They must also complete an interview. UMMS does not set GPA or MCAT cutoffs, but the average medical student has a 3.7 GPA and an MCAT score in the 88th percentile.
  3. University of Missouri Kansas City School of MedicineLOCATIONKansas City, MissouriView School ProfileThe University of Missouri-Kansas City offers six medical programs with 19 specialties. Students can enroll in a six-year BA/MD program or a traditional four-year MD program. These programs incorporate clinical experiences beginning in the first semester. UMKC partners with six leading hospitals to provide students with fieldwork opportunities.Prospective BA/MD students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and score at least 24 on the ACT or 1160 on the SAT. MD applicants must earn an MCAT score of at least 500 to qualify. UMKC enrolls about 645 medical students and accepts about 20% of applicants.
  4. University of Nevada Reno School of MedicineLOCATIONReno, NevadaView School ProfileThe University of Nevada, Reno’s School of Medicine offers a traditional MD program, a BS/MD program, and a post-baccalaureate certificate program. The school also gives students the opportunity to pursue dual degrees, including an MD/MPH, an MD/MBA, and an MD/Ph.D.The school boasts a small community feel, maintaining a 3-to-1 student-to-faculty ratio. Students begin working in clinical environments during their first year.In-state applicants must have a minimum GPA of 2.8 and a 497 or higher MCAT score. Out-of-state applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.3 and an MCAT score that is 500 or higher. The school accepts about 12% of applicants.
  5. LSU Health Sciences Center ShreveportLOCATIONShreveport, LouisianaView School ProfileEstablished in 1969, LSU Health Shreveport was the first state school to offer medical education in Louisiana. The university remains the only medical school in north Louisiana and one of only three operating in the Bayou State.LSU Health Shreveport offers joint Ph.D. programs with Louisiana Tech for students interested in conducting research. The college also offers 43 fully accredited residency and fellowship programs.The college accepts roughly 20% of medical school applicants and does not use GPA or MCAT cutoffs. However, the average student has a 3.7 GPA and a 505 MCAT score.
  6. University of South Dakota Sanford School of MedicineLOCATIONVermillion, South DakotaView School ProfileThe University of South Dakota’s Sanford School of Medicine opened in 1907 and is still the only medical school in the state.Sanford focuses on rural family medicine to treat traditionally underserved communities and uses a unique three-pillar program schedule. Pillars one and two focus on establishing foundational knowledge of biomedical systems and beginning clinical clerkships. The final pillar gives students the opportunity to complete surgery subspecialties, internships, electives, research, and global experiences.The school accepts 14% of applicants. Prospective students must have a minimum GPA of 3.1 and an MCAT score of at least 496.
  7. East Carolina University Brody School of MedicineLOCATIONGreenville, North CarolinaView School ProfileEast Carolina University’s Brody School of Medicine traces its history back to 1965. Students can pursue an MPH, MD, or Ph.D. They can also enroll in a dual-degree program.Brody’s distinction track programs allow learners to study an area of interest that relates to their medical career goals. Additionally, the school’s summer program gives prospective students the opportunity to see what medical school entails and prepares them for the rigorous expectations of the program.The Brody School of Medicine accepts 13% of applicants. The average medical student has a 3.6 GPA and a 508 MCAT score.
  8. Medical College of Georgia at Augusta UniversityLOCATIONAugusta, GeorgiaView School ProfileWith a history spanning nearly 200 years, the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University was one of the first medical schools in the nation. MCG focuses on improving healthcare in Georgia, with 48% of graduates choosing to remain in the state to practice medicine after earning their degree.With 240 students per class, MCG is currently one of the largest medical schools in the U.S. The school offers several medical degrees across 23 departments.MCG accepts 14% of applicants. The college considers an applicant’s residency, MCAT scores, GPA, and letters of recommendation. The average MCG student has a 3.8 overall GPA and an MCAT score of 511. Applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and an MCAT score of at least 496.
  9. University of Oklahoma College of MedicineLOCATIONOklahoma City, OklahomaView School ProfileThe University of Oklahoma’s College of Medicine offers an MD program, a physician assistant program, and several dual-degree options. Additionally, students wishing to complement their practice with public health knowledge can complete concurrent MPH coursework.The college uses an innovative simulation center to train students. The center allows medical students and residents to practice clinical skills on high-tech mannequins.The OU College of Medicine accepts 15% of applicants, and more than 75% of students are Oklahoma residents. The average accepted applicant has a 3.7 GPA and an MCAT score in the 79th percentile. Applicants must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a minimum MCAT score of 492.
  10. University of Nebraska Medical CenterLOCATIONOmaha, NebraskaView School ProfileMedical students at the University of Nebraska Medical Center gain in-depth medical, clinical, interpersonal, and professional skills through practice-based learning. In addition to earning a traditional medical degree, students can pursue one of UNMC’s MD enrichment options. These opportunities include dual-degree programs, an interdisciplinary educational track, and an honors thesis program.UNMC accepts 11% of medical school applicants, which translates to an average incoming class of 130 students each year. The average accepted applicant has a 3.8 GPA and a 515 MCAT score.