What States Have Tuition Reciprocity With Georgia

Last Updated on May 12, 2024 by Team College Learners

Did you know that there are a number of states that have tuition reciprocity with Georgia? What is tuition reciprocity? It’s when a state allows its residents to pay in-state tuition for colleges within or outside that state. Technically, it’s when two or more states have an agreement that their residents will pay in-state tuition rates when they attend schools in another state. Tuition reciprocity agreements are good news because they allow you to save money on college costs, but they’re also beneficial to the state and the school!

Students who are residents of Alabama, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee will receive in-state tuition when they attend a public university in Georgia.

Tuition reciprocity is a program that provides a tuition benefit for residents of participating states that also provide a tuition benefit for Georgia residents. In other words, the participating states have agreed to consider one another’s residents as in-state students for the purpose of granting tuition exemption benefits.

Georgia participates in the Academic Common Market, but only at the graduate level. The ACM comprises Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia. Students who are residents of Alabama, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee will receive in-state tuition when they attend a public university in Georgia.

List of States participating in the Academic Common Market:


  • Alabama

  • Arkansas

  • Delaware

  • Florida

  • Georgia

  • Kentucky

  • Louisiana

  • Maryland

  • Mississippi

  • Oklahoma

  • South Carolina

  • Tennessee

  • Texas

  • Virginia

  • West Virginia



List of states where students receive in-state tuition in Georgia:

States:


  • Alabama

  • Florida

  • North Carolina

  • South Carolina

  • Tennessee

What states have reciprocity for college tuition?

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Regional Tuition Reciprocity Agreements

  • Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont.
  • Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming.

When it comes to in state tuition, there are numerous rules that students have to follow. Tuition reciprocity is one of them. This type of in-state tuition allows students, if their home state has reciprocity, to be able to attend college at in state rates when they move out of their state. Researching tuition reciprocity for multiple states can no longer hold you back! Following the advice in this post you will have all the information you need in less than 10 minutes. Read more to find out about tuition reciprocity virginia.

Most states have signed what is known as the “Tuition Reciprocity Agreement”. The Tuition Reciprocity Agreement means that you will pay the in-state tuition rate for your public institution if you are from a state that does not have an agreement with Georgia.

georgia out of state tuition waiver

What States Have Tuition Reciprocity With Georgia

what is tuition reciprocity?

Tuition reciprocity is an agreement that allows residents of one state to attend most accredited colleges and universities in another state at reduced tuition rates, or even for free. The concept of tuition reciprocity is designed to promote accessibility to higher education by expanding the pool of qualified applicants beyond the state’s borders. Unfortunately, this is not a perfect system, and there are certain restrictions on eligibility for foreign students who want to take advantage of reciprocity benefits with Georgia.

The Academic Common Market (ACM), which is administered by the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), allows for Georgia residents who are enrolled in specific programs at out-of-state institutions to be charged only the applicable in-state tuition by the institution in which the student is enrolled. Eligible programs are those programs, which are at least 50 percent different in curricular content than programs offered in Georgia. Participating states are Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia (Florida and Texas participate only at the graduate level).

Tuition Reciprocity Agreements

Universities in Georgia, to generalize, are on the difficult side of the spectrum when it comes to earning in-state residency. But importantly, there are some harder and easier universities within the system and even the hardest is do-able for the right person. The primary difficulty arises from Georgia’s presumption that if you move to Georgia, then you’re there primarily to attend college. If you can’t overcome that presumption, then you’re out of luck.

For almost all universities in Georgia, that presumption is impossible to overcome if you go to school at all during your domicile period. There are some exceptions, but in general if you are prepared to take a gap-year and work for one year either before your freshman year or after, then it may be possible for you. On the good side of things, you typically will not be required to be 100% financially independent; you can have some help. But you also must be prepared to work in Georgia and earn a not-insignificant amount of money.

Tuition reciprocity programs allow students to attend colleges or universities in a different state than the one in which they reside for in-state or reduced tuition.

Usually these programs are reserved for students who live in the same region but not the same state. Certain programs are tailored to students who study an in-demand field, such as nursing.

REDUCE OUT-OF-STATE TUITION USING REGIONAL TUITION EXCHANGE PROGRAMS | Blog  | Association of Certified College Funding Specialists

In some cases, reciprocity only applies to public schools in the region. In other cases, public and private schools partner to lower tuition across the board.

  • Academic Common Market (ACM): Public colleges within the 15 participating southeastern states of the ACM agree to charge in-state tuition to those students attending an out-of-state college within the ACM *if* the student’s home state does not offer the student’s program of study. For example, a student from landlocked Tennessee who wants to major in Marine Biology, a program unavailable at Tennessee state schools, can attend Coastal Carolina University without paying the much higher out-of-state tuition rate. 
  • Only programs not available in your home state are eligible for reduced tuition, and individual colleges may impose additional restrictions (such as GPA or grade level requirements).  Though most public colleges within ACM states participate, there are a few big name colleges that opt out (University of Virginia is one, and Georgia Tech participates only at the graduate level).

Georgia is one of the few states that have tuition reciprocity with other states. This means that certain states will waive your tuition at public universities in Georgia if you are a resident of their state. The following are the states with reciprocity programs.
Participating states: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida (graduate school only), Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas (graduate school only), Virginia, and West Virginia. 

5 Ways to Get In-State Tuition at an Out-of-State School

The Academic Common Market offers in-state and reduced tuition for students residing in the following states:

  • Alabama
  • Arkansas
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maryland
  • Mississippi
  • Oklahoma
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia

clemson in state tuition for georgia residents

South Carolina Resident
(per year)

  •  Tuition and fees*$15,558
  •  Room and board$11,850 (approximate)
  •  Books and supplies$1,188 (approximate)

  •  Total$28,596

Non-South Carolina Resident
(per year)

  •  Tuition and fees*$38,550
  •  Room and board$11,850 (approximate)
  •  Books and supplies$1,188 (approximate)

  •  Total$51,588

How to Pay In-State Tuition for an Out-of-State University

It should go without saying that one of the best deals out there in the higher education market is your in-state public university.  Subsidized by taxpayer dollars, public universities provide state residents at all income levels access to a top quality education at a discounted price.  Therefore, your home state’s public universities can be a great place to start in the college search process.

What if your search takes you out-of-state though?  Some students find that an out-of-state public college may meet their needs better than their in-state options, whether those needs be for a particular academic program, internship and job opportunities, a warmer climate, or a winning basketball team.  Whatever your particular criteria, you should understand that you will generally pay a premium for accessing those resources at an out-of-state public school.

In limited circumstances, however, it is possible to pay in-state prices (or close to it) for an out-of-state college.  Many state universities participate in reciprocity agreements with neighboring states, where they agree to charge (at least some) residents of neighboring states lower tuition than they would students coming from across the country.  Here are the basics on the four largest tuition reciprocity agreements in the U.S.:

  • Academic Common Market (ACM): Public colleges within the 15 participating southeastern states of the ACM agree to charge in-state tuition to those students attending an out-of-state college within the ACM *if* the student’s home state does not offer the student’s program of study. For example, a student from landlocked Tennessee who wants to major in Marine Biology, a program unavailable at Tennessee state schools, can attend Coastal Carolina University without paying the much higher out-of-state tuition rate.  Only programs not available in your home state are eligible for reduced tuition, and individual colleges may impose additional restrictions (such as GPA or grade level requirements).  Though most public colleges within ACM states participate, there are a few big name colleges that opt out (University of Virginia is one, and Georgia Tech participates only at the graduate level).
    Participating states: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida (graduate school only), Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas (graduate school only), Virginia, and West Virginia. 
  • New England Regional Student Program (RSP) Tuition Break: All public colleges within the six New England states participate in the Tuition Break program, offering reduced tuition (capped at 175% of the in-state tuition rate) to eligible students attending from another New England state. Similar to the ACM, in order to be eligible for reduced tuition, your program of study cannot be offered by your home state’s public institutions, though some participating colleges will allow proximity-based participation for border residents, where the out-of-state colleges is actually located closer to your home than any in-state public options.
    Participating states: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont.
  • Midwestern Student Exchange Program (MSEP):  Public colleges within the 10 participating Midwestern states agree to charge out-of-state students enrolling from other MSEP states no more than 150% of their in-state tuition rate, and participating private colleges offer eligible students at least a 10% discount.  While enrollment in the exchange is automatic at some institutions, discount-granting is a competitive process at other colleges.  Many of the state flagship universities, like the University of Wisconsin at Madison and the University of Michigan, do not participate.
    Participating States: Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin.
  • Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE):  Participating public colleges within the 16 western states and territories agree to charge eligible out-of-state students from those same states no more than 150% of the in-state tuition rate.  Like some of the other reciprocity agreements, many of the most popular in colleges within the region (e.g. the entire University of California system, excepting Merced) choose not to participate (because they don’t have too—they have plenty of out-of-state students willing to pay full price).  Some participating colleges have limited spots for WUE applicants and may restrict discounts by major, academic standards, or financial need.
    Participating states/territories: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Guam/Northern Mariana Islands, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming

As you can see, it is possible to pay in-state tuition—or close to it—at an out-of-state school through participation in one of these regional exchange agreements, or a similar program.  In addition to these large-scale agreements, other geographic discounting programs, such as the University of Minnesota system reciprocity agreement, the University of Maine Flagship Match, and the DC Tuition Assistance Grant program, are sometimes offered by individual institutions, so be sure to do your research to familiarize yourself with any potential discounts on the colleges you’re considering.  In general, public universities count on the revenue generated by high out-of-state tuition rates to keep their universities running, so discounts are not necessarily easy to come by, but many public colleges do offer merit scholarships to outstanding out-of-state students, so be strategic about your college list. Apply to schools—in-state, out-of-state, public, or private— where you stand out from the crowd, and you are unlikely to pay sticker price.

alabama in state tuition for georgia residents

The special rate agreement FSU has approved is consistent with arrangements other universities have made for out-of-state residents in close proximity to their campuses.

These special rates make affording an education from a fully accredited, nationally ranked university a reality for students living in rural and outlying areas, without the need to move away from home and incur additional living expenses.

As tuition rates across the nation continue to rise, an education from Florida State University Panama City is considered a tremendous value.

Alabama residents of the following counties may qualify for this special rate: Baldwin, Barbour, Butler, Clarke, Coffee, Conecuh, Covington, Crenshaw, Dale, Escambia, Geneva, Henry, Houston, Mobile, Monroe, Pike, and Washington.

Georgia residents of the following counties may qualify for this special rate: Baker, Decatur, Early, Miller, and Seminole.

How Can I Get In-State Tuition as an Out-Of-State Student

If you’re a student who would like to attend an out-of-state public college or university but are balking at the steep sticker price, don’t give up on your dream school just yet. Depending on your state of residency, the major you’re interested in, and the school you’d like to attend, you might be eligible for in-state tuition even as an out-of-state student. In an earlier article, Edmit looked at six schools where—through different policies, reciprocity agreements, and scholarship programs—qualifying out-of-state students can receive in-state tuition rates. This article gives a more general overview, exploring six ways you can receive in-state tuition as an out-of-state student.

1. Check If Your State Belongs to a Regional Consortium

According to the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute (CHERI), of the 149 public research and doctorate institutions in the U.S., 61 of them reported participating in a tuition reciprocity program of some sort. (CHERI provides a full list of institutions with reciprocity agreements for those who are interested.) Most states, for example, belong to a regional consortium, through which qualifying students can attend out-of-state public institutions at much more affordable rates. The Academic Common Market (ACM), the Midwest Student Exchange Program (MSEP),  the Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE), and the New England Regional Student Program (RSP) are four major regional consortia, and chances are, your state belongs to one of them. Through the ACM, students from Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia (North Carolina stopped participating in the ACM in 2011) can attend participating out-of-state institutions and receive in-state tuition rates. To qualify, students must pursue a degree program not available in their home state. Similarly, the New England Regional Student Program allows students from Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont to enroll in out-of-state New England public universities. These students receive a sharp discount—typically 150% of the receiving school’s in-state tuition rate. Like the ACM, the RSP Tuition Break requires that students enroll in a degree program not offered by their home state to be eligible for the program.

Neither the Midwest Student Exchange Program nor the Western Undergraduate Exchange has this requirement, however. Through the MSEP, students from Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin (Iowa and South Dakota have elected not to participate in the MSEP in the 2017-18 academic year) can attend out-of-state Midwestern public universities at no more than 150% of the schools’ in-state tuition rates. Students can also receive a minimum of a 10% tuition discount at private universities. Similarly, through the WUE, out-of-state students from Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawai’i, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming will pay no more than 150% of the in-state tuition rate at participating schools. If you’re thinking about graduate school, there’s also the Western Regional Graduate Program (WRGP), through which master’s, graduate certificate, and doctorate students can enroll in participating out-of-state public institutions at the in-state tuition rate.

2. Check If Your State Has a Reciprocity Agreement with another State

According to the Chicago Tribune, “In addition to [regional consortia], some states have their own smaller reciprocity programs or offer flexibility when it comes to determining who qualifies for in-state tuition.” For example, the Minnesota-Wisconsin tuition reciprocity agreement allows Wisconsin residents to attend public universities in Minnesota and receive in-state tuition. Similarly, through the New Mexico-Colorado tuition reciprocity agreement, students from either New Mexico or Colorado can attend public institutions at each other’s state at in-state tuition rates.

Furthermore, some states have flexible definitions of residency for students living in border counties of a neighboring state. For example, thanks to the Border County Higher Education Opportunity Project, Oregon residents living in select border counties will be considered Washington residents for purposes of tuition.

3. Consider a Student Exchange Program

In addition to tuition reciprocity agreements between states, there are agreements made between individual schools themselves. The National Student Exchange (NSE), for example, is a not-for-profit consortium comprised of nearly 200 colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Through NSE, undergraduate students can attend a host institution and pay either the in-state tuition rate of their host campus or the normal tuition and fees of their home campus. Note that students can only attend a host institution for up to one academic year, but they could spend additional terms on exchange at another NSE school if they wish.

Similarly, the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area has a cross-registration program that allows students at one Consortium member institution to take classes at another member institution while paying the tuition rate of their home school. Participating schools include American University, George Mason University, Georgetown University, Howard University, Marymount University, Montgomery College, University of the District of Columbia, and more.

University tuition fees 'should be cut to £7,500' - BBC News

4. Research and Apply to Scholarships  

Another way to receive in-state tuition is to search for programs specific to the school you’d like to attend. Most schools understand that out-of-state tuition can be a significant financial burden and have scholarships specifically for nonresident students. Try searching the school’s website for scholarship programs that waive nonresident tuition as a part of their award. And don’t overlook diversity or legacy scholarships, which may emphasize qualities other than academic excellence alone.

There are also larger scholarship programs that partner with several different colleges and universities. If your parent works at a college or university, for instance, you may be eligible for The Tuition Exchange scholarship. The Tuition Exchange is a non-profit organization comprised of more than 600 private and public institutions. It awards about 7,000 scholarships annually to dependents of faculty and staff at participating schools and covers either tuition or the annual set rate ($37,000 for 2019-2020). Students should apply for The Tuition Exchange simultaneously with applying for college.

5. Check If Any of These Special Circumstances Apply to You

There are also school- and state-wide policies that waive out-of-state tuition based on special circumstances. For example, active military personnel and their dependents are eligible for in-state tuition where they currently live regardless of their resident status. According to the Washington State Legislature, students who belong to an American Indian Tribe and have lived for a year in either Idaho, Montana, Oregon, or Washington are considered Washington residents for tuition purposes. Washington also waives all or a portion of the tuition and fees for state and educational employees, and many other states have similar provisions.

6. Look Up Schools That Have Abolished Out-of-State Tuition

Finally, there are some schools that have abolished out-of-state tuition altogether. Northern Illinois University no longer has out-of-state tuition rates, which has made the school much more affordable for nonresident students. Moreover, Alcorn State, Delta State, and Mississippi Valley State have received attention for charging all students the same tuition rate, effectively eliminating out-of-state tuition.

If you’re looking to receive in-state tuition, hopefully one of the six ways discussed in this article will apply to you. Don’t let out-of-state tuition become a financial barrier to the education you want to receive.

colleges that offer instate tuition to out of state students

1. New England’s Regional Student Program

The New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE) offers Tuition Break Program. It is also known as the Regional Student Program (RSP). RSP Tuition Break enables New England residents to enroll at out of state New England public colleges and universities at a discount. Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont are a part of the program.

Students are eligible when they enroll in an approved major. This tends to be one not offered by the public colleges and universities in their home state. More than 1,200 undergrad and grad degree programs are available. And you can use the database on the NEBHE site to look up the 82 public colleges and universities that offer them. In 2018 to 2019, the programs helped over 8,100 NE residents get an average tuition break of $7,900 each.

2. Midwestern Student Exchange Program (MSEP)

The Midwestern Higher Education Compact oversees the MSEP or Midwest Student Exchange Program, the region’s tuition reciprocity program. Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, and Wisconsin participate in the program. Through MSEP, public schools agree to charge no more than 150% of the in-state rate for specific programs. Private schools offer a 10% discount on their tuition rates.

In 2018, there were 13,166 students in MSEP programs and savings of $93.5 million dollars by 2019. That said, decisions about enrollment are at the discretion of the host campus. Many also set specific rules for MSEP programs that apply to admission.

3. Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE)

The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) offers the Western Undergraduate Exchange (WUE) program. WUE covers hundreds of majors at over 160 two and four-year schools. The program is also available for students in 16 WICHE member states. Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming, and the CNMI.

Thus, out-of-state students pay no more than 150% of in-state tuition at member schools. This compares with non-resident rates that can exceed 300% of in-state rates. In 2018 – 2019, over 40,000 students reported saving more than $380.5 million dollars on out of state tuition through WUE.

4. Western Regional Graduate Program (WRGP)

Another WICHE run program is the Western Regional Graduate Program (WRGP). WRGP enables residents to enroll in available grad programs outside of their home state at resident tuition rates. Specifically, you pay up to 150% of resident tuition. The program is also available whether you are pursuing a master’s degree, grad certificate or doctorate. And if eligible, there are over 800 grad programs at some 60 public colleges that take part. If the program you want to enroll in is eligible, you need to apply directly to the university’s graduate studies department. In fall 2018, 1,478 students enrolled through WRGP and saved $22.7 million dollars in tuition.

5. WICHE’s Professional Student Exchange Program (PSEP)

WICHE also offers the Professional Student Exchange Program (PSEP). PSEP is for students in 10 western states and the CNMI. It enables those whose major is a health care profession to enroll in selected out of state professional programs. There are 10 approved health care studies which are Dentistry, Medicine, OT, Optometry, Homeopathic Medicine, Pharmacy, PT, Physician Assistant, Podiatry and Veterinary Medicine. That said, PSEP only fund students whose major is unavailable in one of their in state public colleges.

6. Southern Regional Education Board – Academic Common Market

The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) offers Academic Common Market (ACM). ACM provides tuition discounts for more than 1,900 academic programs in 15 states. Participating states incllude Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. The program is only if you want to pursue a degree that an in-state school does not offer. You can enroll in out-of-state school that offers the degree program you want and pay the in-state tuition rates.

7. SREB’s Regional Contract Program

Another program from the SREB is the Regional Contract Program. It enables you to pursue a professional health degree at out-of-state school. Students will pay in-state tuition at public schools or reduced tuition at private colleges. There are currently seven member states such as Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina. In order to receive reduced tuition, students must be studying dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathic medicine, podiatry or veterinary medicine.

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