Yale School Of Forestry Acceptance Rate

Last Updated on August 12, 2023 by Oluwajuwon Alvina

Will you be among the students accepted this year? The Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies is a highly selective school. Here are some facts and figures to help you evaluate your chance of acceptance.

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Yale Graduate School Acceptance Rate

Application Open for the 2019 Field Ecology Intership | Yale Forests

The Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies (F&ES) is a professional school of Yale University. It was founded to train foresters, and now trains environmental leaders through four 2-year degree programs (Master of Environmental Management, Master of Environmental Science, Master of Forestry, and Master of Forest Science) and two 10-month mid-career programs. Yale F&ES strives to create new knowledge that will sustain and restore the health of the biosphere and emphasizes the possibility of creating a regenerative coexistence between humans and non-human life and the rest of the natural world. Still offering forestry instruction, the school has the oldest graduate forestry program in the United States.

What are the criteria for admission to F&ES?

  • Completion of an undergraduate degree. Whatever your major, introductory coursework in the biological, physical, and social sciences, plus college mathematics, is preferred.
  • Achievement and integrity in your academic and/or professional career.
  • Established commitment to professional and/or scholarly engagement in environmental issues, whether at the local, national, or global scale; two or more years of experience post-baccalaureate is a plus.
  • Promise of a future career as an environmental leader.
  • Demonstrated capacity for critical, creative, entrepreneurial, and strategic thinking.

Admissions at Yale University are famous for their extremely competitive and selective process. With an acceptance rate of just 6.2%, Yale is considered among the most coveted top universities of the US, as well as around the globe.

As per the profile of class of 2023, out of 36, 844 applications, only 6.2% of the applicants were accepted. International students made up about 21% of the total enrollment of 13,609 students.

Hybrid Vigor: Forest School Builds on Historic Strengths — and Creates New  Opportunities

Student life

YSE graduates with decorated caps, 2019

The school has an active tradition of student involvement in academic and extracurricular life. Many students take part in student interest groups, which organize events around environmental issues of interest to them. These groups range in interest from Conservation Finance and International Development, to the Built Environment and “Fresh & Salty: The Society for Marine and Coastal systems”. There are also social and recreational groups, such as the Forestry Club, which every Friday organizes themed “TGIF” (“Thank-God-I’m-a-Forester”) happy hours and school parties; the Polar Bear club, which swims monthly in Long Island Sound under the full moon (year-round); Veggie Dinner, which is a weekly vegetarian dinner club; the Loggerrhythms, an a cappella singing group; and the student-run BYO Café in Kroon Hall opened in 2010. A notable YSE tradition is the extravagant environmentally inspired decoration of graduation caps in preparation for commencement.

How do I get into Yale School of Forestry

What are the criteria for admission to the Yale School of the Environment? Completion of an undergraduate degree. Whatever your major, introductory coursework in the biological, physical, and social sciences, plus college mathematics, is preferred. Achievement and integrity in your academic and/or professional career.

Yale School of the Environment

Established1900
Parent institutionYale University
DeanIndy Burke
Academic staff47
Postgraduates280
Doctoral students75
LocationNew Haven, Connecticut, United States
41°19′01″N 72°55′25″WCoordinates: 41°19′01″N 72°55′25″W
Websiteenvironment.yale.edu

Yale School of the Environment (YSE) is a professional school of Yale University. It was founded to train foresters, and now trains environmental leaders through four 2-year degree programs (Master of Environmental Management, Master of Environmental Science, Master of Forestry, and Master of Forest Science) and two 10-month mid-career programs. YSE strives to create new knowledge that will sustain and restore the health of the biosphere and emphasizes the possibility of creating a regenerative coexistence between humans and non-human life and the rest of the natural world. Still offering forestry instruction, the school has the oldest graduate forestry program in the United States.

The school changed its name to the Yale School of the Environment in July 2020. It was previously the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

School of the Environment - Yale University - Graduate Programs and Degrees

History

Yale School of Forestry, Class of 1904

The school was founded in 1900 as the Yale Forest School, to provide high-level forestry training suited to American conditions. At the urging of Yale alumnus Gifford Pinchot, his parents endowed the two-year postgraduate program. At the time Pinchot was serving as Bernhard Fernow’s successor as Chief of the Division of Forestry (predecessor of the U.S. Forest Service, USFS). Pinchot released two foresters from the division to start the school: fellow Yale graduate Henry Solon Graves and James Toumey.[1] Graves became the School’s first dean and Toumey its second.

When the school opened, other places in the United States offered forestry training, but none had a post-graduate program. (Both Pinchot and Graves had gone to Europe to study forestry after graduating from Yale.) In the fall of 1900, the New York State College of Forestry at Cornell had 24 students, Biltmore Forest School 9, and Yale 7. Despite its small size, from its beginnings the school influenced American forestry. The first two chiefs of the USFS were Pinchot and Graves; the next three were graduates from the school’s first decade. Wilderness and land conservation advocate Aldo Leopold graduated in the class of 1908.

In 1915, Yale School of Forestry’s second dean, James Toumey, became one of the “charter members”, along with William L. Bray of the New York State College of Forestry, by then reestablished at Syracuse University, and Raphael Zon, of the Ecological Society of America. In 1950, the “activist wing” of that society formed The Nature Conservancy.

Besides the school’s own forests, Yale has used a number of other sites in the eastern United States for field education over the years. From 1904 to 1926, the summer session leading to a master’s degree in forestry was held at Grey Towers and Forester’s Hall in Milford, Pennsylvania. Beginning in 1912, Yale classes took occasional field trips to the land of the Crossett Lumber Company in Arkansas. For two decades from 1946 until 1966, the company provided the school a “camp,” including cabins and a mess hall, used during spring coursework on forest management and wood products production. Yale students have also used a field camp at the Great Mountain Forest in northwestern Connecticut since 1941.

Reflective of the expanding variety of environmental interests, the school changed its name to the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies in 1972. Today, YSE is a leader in global sustainability, hosting the bi-annual Yale Environmental Sustainability Summit to assemble thought leaders from around the globe. The school’s 16th and present dean is Ingrid “Indy” Burke, who replaced Sir Peter Crane in October, 2016. The school changed its name to Yale School of the Environment in July 2020 and, within the school, created a distinct Forest School with dedicated faculty and degrees.

It also teaches the Yale College undergraduate courses needed for the Environmental Studies major.

School buildings

Kroon Hall, as seen from Prospect StreetSage Hall, completed in 1924The school’s main buildings, bottom center, on Science Hill

The school offers classes at Kroon Hall, Sage Hall, Greeley Labs, Marsh Hall, the Environmental Science Center, and the houses at 301 Prospect St. and 380 Edwards St. Kroon Hall, the school’s main building, is named for the philanthropist Richard Kroon (Yale Class of 1964). The building has 50,000 square feet (5,000 m2) of space. It is “a showcase of the latest developments in green building technology, a healthy and supportive environment for work and study, and a beautiful building that actively connects students, faculty, staff, and visitors with the natural world.”[11] The building obtained Platinum Rating under the LEED certification system.[11] It is designed by Hopkins Architects of London with Architect of Record Centerbrook Architects & Planners. Goodfellow Inc from Delson, Quebec, supplied the glulam roof structure for this project.

yale graduate programs

  • Yale Institute for Biospheric Studies
  • Center for Business and the Environment at Yale
  • Center for Environmental Law and Policy
  • Center for Green Chemistry & Green Engineering at Yale
  • Center for Industrial Ecology
  • Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry
  • Hixon Center for Urban Ecology
  • Tropical Resources Institute
  • The Yale Program on Climate Communication
  • Urban Resources Initiative
  • The Forests Dialogue
  • Governance, Environment and Markets Initiative
  • High Plains Stewardship Initiative (UCROSS)
  • Environmental Leadership and Training Initiative
  • Yale Climate Connections

School forest

The school owns and manages 10,880 acres (44 km2) of forestland in Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Vermont. The Yale Myers Forest, in Union, Connecticut, donated to Yale in 1930 by alumnus George Hewitt Myers, is managed by the school as a multiple-use working forest. Yale-Toumey Forest, near Keene, New Hampshire, was set up by James W. Toumey (a former dean of the school) in 1913. Other Yale forestlands include Goss Woods, Crowell Forest, Cross Woods, Bowen Forest, and Crowell Ravine. A three-alarm fire burned several buildings within the Yale Myers Forest Camp on May 28, 2016.[13] The damaged camp buildings and a new research center were rebuilt in 2017.

Student life

YSE graduates with decorated caps, 2019

The school has an active tradition of student involvement in academic and extracurricular life. Many students take part in student interest groups, which organize events around environmental issues of interest to them. These groups range in interest from Conservation Finance and International Development, to the Built Environment and “Fresh & Salty: The Society for Marine and Coastal systems”. There are also social and recreational groups, such as the Forestry Club, which every Friday organizes themed “TGIF” (“Thank-God-I’m-a-Forester”) happy hours and school parties; the Polar Bear club, which swims monthly in Long Island Sound under the full moon (year-round); Veggie Dinner, which is a weekly vegetarian dinner club; the Loggerrhythms, an a cappella singing group; and the student-run BYO Café in Kroon Hall opened in 2010. A notable YSE tradition is the extravagant environmentally inspired decoration of graduation caps in preparation for commencement.

Ingalls Field Ecology Program | Yale Forests

Yale School Of The Environment Alumni

  • Alphonse “Buddy” Fletcher Jr., class of 2004[17]
  • Frances Beinecke, President, Natural Resources Defense Council; member, National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling (2010)
  • Richard M. Brett, conservationist
  • Ian Cheney, Emmy-nominated filmmaker
  • William Wallace Covington, Regents’ Professor, Northern Arizona University
  • Emanuel Fritz, professor known as “Mr. Redwood”
  • William B. Greeley, Chief, U.S. Forest Service, 1920–1928
  • Christopher T. Hanson, Chairman, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 2021–
  • Stuart L. Hart, academic addressing global poverty and economic development, professor emeritus at Cornell University
  • Phillip Hoose, author
  • Ralph Hosmer, pioneering Hawaiian forester
  • Edward M. Kennedy Jr., 1991, attorney and Connecticut state senator
  • Aldo Leopold, 1908, conservationist and author of A Sand County Almanac
  • H. R. MacMillan, forester and industrialist
  • John R. McGuire, Chief, U.S. Forest Service, 1972–1979
  • Thornton T. Munger, pioneering U.S. Forest Service researcher; civic activist who helped create Portland, Oregon’s Forest Park
  • Mark Plotkin, ethnobotanist, explorer, and activist
  • Robert Michael Pyle, lepidopterist and John-Burroughs-Medal–winning author
  • Samuel J. Record, botanist
  • Ferdinand A. Silcox, Chief, U.S. Forest Service, 1933–1939
  • David Martyn Smith, forester and educator, author of The Practice of Silviculture
  • Robert Y. Stuart, Chief, U.S. Forest Service, 1928–1933
  • Dorceta E. Taylor, environmental sociologist, Yale University
Bonding through hiking < Yale School of Medicine

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