Towson University Psychology Graduate Program

Last Updated on March 7, 2023 by

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About Towson University Counseling Psychology

Psychology (M.A.)
Gain an in-depth understanding of the principles of psychology and human behavior with a global perspective on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of mental health concerns.

This master’s program equips you with the knowledge and research experience to pursue careers in human services, education, or in a variety of professional settings. If you are seeking an academic career, you will be fully prepared to continue your education in a doctoral program.

Admission Requirements & Deadlines | Towson University

Program Concentrations
Choose from four program concentrations:

Clinical Psychology Concentration — Prepare to apply for admission to a doctoral program in clinical psychology (PsyD or PhD), to work as a psychometrician or behavioral specialist, to serve as a project director on applied research studies, or to become a licensed clinical professional counselor.

Counseling Psychology Concentration — Work toward licensure as a professional counselor in community health centers, psychiatric hospitals, group homes, rehabilitation centers, university counseling centers, career centers, substance abuse center or other settings. The program also prepares you to continue your education. Choose from the practitioner or research track.

Experimental Psychology Concentration — Gain research training in any area of psychology and prepare to enroll in a PhD program, or work in the public and private sectors, such as the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Army Research Labs.

School Psychology Concentration — Provide consultations to teachers and families to help prevent behavioral and academic difficulties in school settings; provide early intervention to address difficulties; and conduct comprehensive psychological evaluations to assess student learning and social/emotional needs. You will be recognized as a nationally certified school psychologist upon successful completion of the national exam in school psychology.

WHY TOWSON?
Experienced Faculty
Receive extensive training in research design and analysis. The program’s diverse and experienced faculty demonstrate strengths in biological, cognitive and social psychology.

Computer Lab Support
Enjoy access to the psychology computer lab, which includes the latest research and statistical programs.

Testing and Assessment
Build your testing capabilities through the psychology test library, a collection of psychological assessments, test protocols, reference literature and more.

The clinical psychology concentration of the Master of Arts in Psychology is ideally suited to meet the needs of individuals who want to provide clinical services at the masters’ level as a licensed clinical professional counselor (LCPC), want to work as master’s-level psychometricians or behavioral specialists, want to work as research or clinical staff on applied research studies, or are considering pursuing doctoral training in clinical psychology.

The program curriculum provides comprehensive and hands-on training in assessment, diagnosis, state-of-the-art and evidence-based treatments, as well as research methods and statistics. Courses in psychotherapy and behavior change prepare students to do intake interviews and case conceptualizations and to provide evidence-based individual therapy. Advanced seminars in legal, ethical, and professional issues in psychology, personality and intellectual assessment are offered regularly and prepare students for the required nine-month field placement.

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Opportunities are available for students to work on research projects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. In addition to completing a research thesis, students may also have the opportunity, depending on the faculty member, to assist in developing research conference presentations and manuscripts for publication.

A unique feature of the clinical psychology concentration is a required halftime, nine-month internship. Students may elect to complete a clinical or research internship depending upon their personal and professional goals. Students on clinical internships provide supervised psychological services to clients in an off-campus mental health setting. Students on research internships will assist an experienced scientist in conducting clinical trials research.

Clinical psychology students are encouraged to attend full time so as to complete all program requirements within four terms. Students may, however, attend part time for some or all of their degree work.

Admission Requirements
Courses in the following areas:

General Psychology (3)
Abnormal Psychology (3)
Behavioral Statistics (3) or Research Methods (3)
Personality, social, cognitive or developmental psychology (3)
Students must have earned a grade of “B” or better in all prerequisites except general psychology. These courses cannot be used to meet the formal elective requirements for the degree as defined below.

A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.00.
All GPA calculations for admission are based upon the last 60 units of undergraduate and post-baccalaureate studies
GRE Scores are not required and will not be considered for the 2022 admissions cycle.

Two letters of recommendation are required. Letters from experiential placements/internships/fieldwork and from academic sources (e.g., professors) are preferred. Please do not send personal reference letters (e.g., letters from parents, friends, family, employers/supervisors from a non-psychology related job, etc.)

A personal statement. Applicants are required to submit with their applications a personal statement (no longer than 3 pages double-spaced) indicating why they are interested in pursuing a graduate degree in clinical psychology, their area of clinical and/or research interests, and their professional goals. As described at our website, we have two training options within the clinical psychology master’s program: the practitioner option and the researcher option. Please indicate which option you wish to pursue; if you choose the researcher option, please browse the list of faculty in the psychology department (https://www.towson.edu/cla/departments/psychology/facultystaff/) and indicate at least 1-3 specific faculty members with whom you would be interested in working and why you are interested in working with them. Also, students should include in their statement a discussion of what they see as their greatest strength and weakness as an aspiring graduate student in clinical psychology.

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A resume or vita highlighting research and clinical experiences in psychology or related disciplines.

Applicants must complete the online application and include the required materials.
Admissions Interview
Applicants who meet our minimum academic requirements and are considered a good fit for the program will be invited to interview with the clinical psychology program admissions committee. The interview is a required part of the admissions process.

Admissions Timeline
Students are admitted to the Clinical Psychology program for the fall term only. Those wishing to begin graduate work in the fall must have their completed application and all admission credentials submitted to University Admissions by January 15. Application materials will be reviewed between January 15 and February 1. Interviews will be scheduled during the third and fourth week in February and first week in March. Offers of admission will be sent from the beginning to the middle of March with an expected acceptance date of April 15. (Please note that this timeline is tentative and subject to change). Admission is granted on a competitive, space-available basis.

Prospective applicants are encouraged to visit the clinical psychology website.

Non-immigrant International Students
Program Enrollment: F-1 and J-1 students are required to be enrolled full-time. The majority of their classes must be in-person and on campus. See the list of programs that satisfy these requirements, and contact the International Student and Scholars Office with questions.

Admission Procedures: See additional information regarding Graduate Admission policies and International Graduate Application online.

Degree Requirements
Students may choose between the Researcher and Practitioner options. Students pursuing either option must complete 48 units of required and elective coursework including a research project (see below for details) and a two-term, 500-hour field placement. Students may need to take summer courses to meet the program requirements.

Researcher vs. Practitioner Options
Students in both options must complete the 36 units of required coursework. Additional requirements for each of the options are noted below.

Researcher Option

Students electing to pursue the Researcher option will work with a faculty member to complete an empirical thesis. Students must take a total of 6 units of thesis credits; students may either take PSYC 897 for 6 units in one term or PSYC 898 for 3 units over two terms. Students must also take 6 units of elective credit.

NOTE: Students must remain continuously enrolled in a Thesis course until all thesis requirements have been completed and must be enrolled in thesis credits during the term in which they plan to graduate. Students who have taken all 6 units of thesis credit and who have not completed the thesis requirements must take PSYC 899 (Thesis Continuum) for 1-unit during each subsequent term until the thesis requirements are complete.

Practitioner Option

Students electing to pursue the Practitioner option will work with the program director and internship coordinator to complete a capstone clinical presentation integrating theory, evidence based research, and clinical intervention techniques that they have learned and used with one client during their clinical internship year. These presentations will be open to students and faculty within the program and will be evaluated on a pass/fail basis by the program director and internship coordinator. Students will have one opportunity to re-do their presentation if it was not acceptable the first time. In addition, students in the practitioner option will be required to take PSYC 730, Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy. Students must also take 9 units of elective credit.

Electives
Elective course work is chosen by the student from within or outside the field of psychology. These courses are expected to complement the program of study and require prior written consent of the program director.

Field Placement Requirement
The practicum and internship carry with them a residency requirement of two terms. The student must be available for a 16-hour per week placement in a clinical or research setting. All students must obtain the grade of “B” or better in Practicum in Clinical Psychology (PSYC 697) and Internship in Clinical Psychology (PSYC 797). Students earning a grade lower than “B” in either course may repeat the entire sequence no more than one time. Failure to earn a “B” or higher in both courses will result in dismissal from the program.

The Master of Arts in Psychology has four concentrations:

Clinical Psychology:
Program Director: Dr. Jonathan Mattanah
Phone: 410-704-3208
Email: [email protected]
Counseling Psychology:
Program Director: Dr. Christa K. Schmidt
Phone: 410-704-3063
Email: [email protected]
Experimental Psychology:
Program Director: Dr. Justin Buckingham
Phone: 410-704-3214
Email: [email protected]
School Psychology:
Program Director: Dr. Craig Rush
Phone: 410-704-3263
Email: [email protected]
Each concentration is described on its own page in detail with reference to objectives and requirements. All listed prerequisite courses are undergraduate courses.

Please note that only one master’s degree can be awarded; students who complete more than one concentration in Psychology will not receive two different degrees. In addition, a Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) is offered in School Psychology.

The faculty in the Department of Psychology recognizes a special responsibility to the profession of psychology to ensure that all graduates of the program demonstrate attitudes and behavior consistent with the standards of the profession. The faculty of the specialization involved may recommend to the program director remedial or disciplinary action for such behavior as dishonesty, unethical conduct or other behaviors construed by the faculty as counterproductive to the field of psychology. Students have the right to appeal any action according to the procedures outlined in this catalog.

Students who complete one of the Master of Arts in Psychology concentrations are prepared to enter a variety of professions as well as pursue post-master’s and doctoral studies.

  • Courses
  • PSYC 503 INFANT AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT (3)
  • Advanced course reviewing historical and current changes in the areas of infancy and childhood. Emotional, cognitive and individual development will be covered in-depth. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis of research theory construction and methods. Prerequisite: PSYC 203; spring semester.
  • PSYC 504 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Physical, emotional and intellectual development during adolescence; social development and heterosexuality; adolescent personality; problems of adjustment; juvenile delinquency. Prerequisite: PSYC 203; fall and spring semester.
  • PSYC 511 TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS (3)
  • Psychological and educational testing and evaluation. The construction, administration, interpretation and use of the various evaluative devices of aptitude and achievement. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and PSYC 212; fall, spring and summer semester.
  • PSYC 512 PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY (3)
  • Mechanisms of drugs, their effects on behavior, and related topics. Prerequisites: 9 units of PSYC or consent of instructor; BIOL 110.
  • PSYC 515 MOTIVATION (3)
  • Interaction between physiological, neurological and pharmacological aspects of motivation with environmental influences such as culture, learning and social dynamics. Issues in human motivation and emotion that will be emphasized are aggression, sex, achievement (competence) and cognitive-social influences. Prerequisites: 6 units of psychology; PSYC 203 and junior standing recommended.
  • PSYC 517 SENSATION AND PERCEPTION (3)
  • A systematic investigation of the basic senses such as vision, audition, taste, smell and touch will be undertaken. The organization of sensory input will also be emphasized. Both human and nonhuman data will be presented. Prerequisites: 9 units of psychology or consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 519 DIVERSE PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Diverse theories and topics explored by both traditional and modern psychology, drawn from a range of philosophical and cultural perspectives: psychodynamic and behaviorist approaches, and existential, positive, transpersonal and mind-body psychology. Prerequisites: 6 units of Psychology.
  • PSYC 532 CROSS CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Comparison of psychological behavior and theory in Western and non-Western cultures. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.
  • PSYC 547 SEX DIFFERENCES: PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES (3)
  • Sex role/personality development is examined from various perspectives: social, cultural, evolutionary and biological. Changing conceptions with regard to women, their roles and self-concepts, are emphasized within the overall context of sex difference and similarities.
  • PSYC 550 PERSONALITY (3)
  • Introduction to theoretical perspectives and research aimed at understanding personality processes and individual differences in thought, emotion, and behavior. Perspectives may include psychoanalytic, dispositional, biological, learning, and humanistic. Prerequisites: 6 units of psychology; fall and spring semester.
  • PSYC 551 INTRODUCTION TO THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD (3)
  • Children with atypical physical, mental, social and emotional development, including the physically handicapped, the mentally retarded, the gifted, and emotionally disturbed children. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, PSYC 203 or PSYC 211.
  • PSYC 557 GENDER IDENTITY IN TRANSITION (3)
  • Psychological consequences of changing definitions of femininity, masculinity and personhood will be examined by using recent theories of gender identity formation. Concepts such as androgyny, sex-role transcendence and future shock will be related to psychological adaptation to change. Prerequisite: PSYC 315 or PSYC 447, or consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 560 ETHOLOGY AND COMPARATIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • A survey of the major behavioral adaptations in nonhuman and human species, within the framework of evolutionary theory, ethology and experimental psychology. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisites: 9 units of psychology or consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 561 COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Examination of human cognitive processes and theories of cognition from the perspectives of information processing theory, neuroscience and connectionism. Topics include pattern perception, attention, memory, concepts, decision making, problem solving and language. Prerequisite: PSYC 314 or consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 565 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Course is concerned with an introduction to the physiological bases of behavior. The topics to be considered are basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, sensory and motor systems, motivational systems, and higher order behavioral systems. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisites: 9 units of psychology or consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 567 MIDLIFE DEVELOPMENT (3)
  • A study of adult behavior between the ages of 18 and 60. The developmental stages of young adulthood, adulthood and middle age will be discussed along with topics pertinent to each of the levels such as leaving and becoming emancipated from the family; the transition and adjustment to marriage and work; and bridging the gap between ideals and actual fulfillment. Prerequisite: PSYC 203.
  • PSYC 570 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-3)
  • Survey and critical evaluation of modern literature pertaining to selected problems in psychology. May be repeated in a different topic for a maximum of 12 units.
  • PSYC 581 READINGS IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-2)
  • A survey of relevant research literature under the guidance of a staff member who will direct the student’s research. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 units. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: 9 units of PSYC and consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 591 INDEPENDENT INVESTIGATION IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • An opportunity for especially qualified students to undertake independent research problems according to their interest and training under the direction of a staff member. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 units, but only 6 units can apply to the major; the other 6 units will be used as general electives. Graded S/U. Prerequisite: PSYC 314 or PSYC 313, PSYC 391, and consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 594 TRAVEL AND STUDY ABROAD IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-3)
  • Study of selected topics, issues, programs, projects and/or facilities related to the field of psychology. Locations and topics to be selected by department and instructor sponsoring the program. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 605 COUNSELING TECHNIQUES (3)
  • Training the student in practical counseling skills through demonstration and role playing with feedback in behavioral performance.
  • PSYC 606 CAREER DEVELOPMENT (3)
  • Designed to familiarize students with aspects of career development, to introduce them to a variety of relevant resources and media, and to assist them in integrating this knowledge by planning a program of career development for a specific group.
  • PSYC 607 APPLIED THEORIES OF COUNSELING (3)
  • Counseling theorists whose applied methodology has been successful in the treatment of various client populations. Techniques and application of methodologies in field settings.
  • PSYC 609 ADVANCED COUNSELING TECHNIQUES (3)
  • Advanced therapeutic interventions with various client populations. Prerequisite: PSYC 605 and PSYC 607.
  • PSYC 610 ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY OF AGING (3)
  • Advanced study of the changes in learning, emotions, personality and social behavior and the impact of culture and attitudes on aging. Prerequisites: 6 units of psychology including PSYC 203. Students should be aware of how to read and understand psychology journals and how psychological research is conducted. Fall semester, evening, in alternate years.
  • PSYC 611 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Psychological structures and functions in human development across the life span. Both theoretical and research approaches are presented.
  • PSYC 612 DIAGNOSTIC INTERVIEWING AND ASSESSMENT (3)
  • Development of clinical interviewing and diagnostic assessment skills, using role plays, recorded and live interviews, and supervision. Course open only to students enrolled in the master’s program in clinical psychology. Prerequisites: program admission and approval of program director.
  • PSYC 613 COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING (3)
  • Types of community health services and the relationships between those services; the responsibility of counseling in a mental health center; and the area of mental health consultant. Emphasis will be given to the application of counseling skills in a mental health setting.
  • PSYC 615 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS IN COUNSELING (3)
  • Principal methods of behavioral research emphasizing concepts rather than statistical procedures. Preparation of counselors to evaluate methods, designs, and results of counseling research.
  • PSYC 622 ADVANCED MULTICULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Promotion of cultural awareness and understanding of relevant theories, terminology and techniques for communicating and working with individuals of diverse backgrounds. Prerequisites: Advanced standing in counseling, clinical or school psychology and permission of instructor.
  • PSYC 623 PSYCHOLOGICAL ISSUES IN THE WORKPLACE (3)
  • Psychological effects and consequences of workplace stressors on employees and their families; job lost and insecurity, workplace stress, work-life balance and employee well-being, quality of work life and diversity management, adapting to organization change and career transition, and workplace ethical issues. Integration of course concepts from the disciplines of organizational psychology, human resource management and development, counseling, clinical and occupational health psychology.
  • PSYC 624 MULTICULTURAL ISSUES IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Critical examination of multicultural issues within clinical psychology. Focus on re-conceptualizing assessment, research, and psychotherapy from a multicultural lens. Use of critical pedagogy perspectives to foster cultural awareness and humility. Open to students enrolled in the master’s program in clinical psychology with department consent. Prerequisites: program admission and approval of program director.
  • PSYC 625 FUNCTIONAL BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENT (3)
  • Application of behavioral assessment and analysis techniques in school settings. Prerequisites: 21 units in psychology, matriculation in graduate program in Psychology, consent of program director.
  • PSYC 631 ADVANCED ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Current and historical perspectives of psychopathology. Emphasis on various diagnostic approaches. Prerequisite: PSYC 361.
  • PSYC 632 ADVANCED CHILD PSYCHOPATHOLOGY (3)
  • Etiology and presentation of various behavioral and psychological disorders which begin in or are unique to childhood and adolescence. Overview of pertinent developmental information and various perspectives of psychology and how they relate to the etiology and treatment of these disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 631.
  • PSYC 637 COUNSELING STRATEGIES FOR DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE (3)
  • Understanding the basic issues of substance abuse, referrals, clinical assessments and developing counseling strategies for successful intervention.
  • PSYC 639 POSITIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY (2)
  • Exposes students to the theoretical foundations of positive psychology and apply its major tenets to the practice of psychotherapy. Prerequisite: graduate enrollment in counseling or clinical psychology, or related field.
  • PSYC 647 INDIVIDUAL APPRAISAL (3)
  • Practice in the use and analysis of techniques for understanding the individual with emphasis upon standardized procedures.
  • PSYC 651 INTERVENTIONS IN SCHOOL SETTINGS (3)
  • Group and individual intervention strategies appropriate for school settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 625.
  • PSYC 665 PSYCHOTHERAPY AND BEHAVIOR CHANGE I (3)
  • First of two-term sequence. Development of skill in theory-based and diagnostic case conceptualization and intake interviewing. Readings, lectures, and practical experiences related to intake interviewing. Dynamic, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic theoretical models as they relate to case conceptualization. Prerequisites: graduate standing in School or Clinical Psychology tracks and consent of program director.
  • PSYC 666 PSYCHOTHERAPY AND BEHAVIOR CHANGE II (3)
  • Second of two-term sequence. Development of knowledge of evidence-based practices in psychology. Readings, lectures, exercises, and practical experience to develop skill in goal setting treatment planning, and delivery of empirically supported individual therapies and treatment techniques. Prerequisites: PSYC 665 and consent of program director.
  • PSYC 672 PROSEMINAR (3)
  • Development of research proposals, including the literature review, proposed method and data analysis. Emphasis on use of appropriate format and style, both written and oral presentation of material. Prerequisite: PSYC 212 and PSYC 314.
  • PSYC 674 ADVANCED BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (4)
  • Major concepts, processes and methods in the field of biological psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 212, PSYC 314 and PSYC 672.
  • PSYC 675 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (1)
  • Preparation and presentation of first-year empirical research projects to peers and faculty. Prerequisites: PSYC 672, PSYC 687, and enrollment in the Experimental Psychology Program. Corerequiste: PSYC 691.
  • PSYC 678 SCHOOL-WIDE PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION SEMINAR (3)
  • Practical school-wide prevention and intervention approaches for various issues that impact PK-12 schools, emphasis on universal (Tier 1) level. Corequisite: PSYC 771 or PSYC 773. Prerequisite: School Psychology Program admission.
  • PSYC 679 SPECIAL TOPICS SEMINAR (1-3)
  • Topics vary according to the instructor. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 units.
  • PSYC 680 ADVANCED COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (4)
  • Study of human cognition, the cognitive perspective, and major methods of cognitive psychology. Topics will include perception, attention, memory, language, thinking, and cognitive neuroscience. The course includes reading of primary source articles and laboratory investigations of cognitive phenomena. Permit from program director required. Prerequisites: PSYC 212 and PSYC 314.
  • PSYC 682 ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Study of major theories, methods, and studies in social psychology. Course involves reading and discussion of primary research articles. Topics include social cognition, attitudes, and social influence. Permit from program director required. Prerequisites: PSYC 212, PSYC 314.
  • PSYC 685 COLLEGE TEACHING PRACTICUM (3)
  • Supervised teaching of introductory psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 684.
  • PSYC 687 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN I (3)
  • Treatment of descriptive and inferential statistical methods and design considerations. Prerequisite: PSYC 212 or equivalent.
  • PSYC 688 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN II (3)
  • Treatment of advanced analysis of variance designs and related techniques. Prerequisite: PSYC 687 or equivalent.
  • PSYC 689 MULTIVARIATE METHODS (3)
  • Multivariate statistical methods useful in behavioral scientific research. Topics: correlation, regression, factor analysis, discriminate analysis. Prerequisite: PSYC 687.
  • PSYC 691 INDEPENDENT INVESTIGATION IN PSYCHOLOGY (1-3)
  • An opportunity for graduate students to undertake research problems according to their interest and training under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units. Prerequisites: PSYC 212 and PSYC 314; instructor permit.
  • PSYC 695 INDEPENDENT STUDY (3)
  • Individual and supervised study in selected areas of psychology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 697 PRACTICUM IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (1-6)
  • Supervised experience in psychological interviewing, assessment and psychotherapy. Practicum in which students will meet for individualized supervision with the practicum instructor. Prerequisites: PSYC 620, M.A. candidacy in Clinical Psychology and consent of program director.
  • PSYC 703 PRESCHOOL ASSESSMENT (3)
  • Understanding the development of young children through formal and informal assessment. Prerequisites: PSYC 620, matriculation in School Psychology Track or consent of program director.
  • PSYC 713 ROLE OF THE SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST (3)
  • History and foundations of school psychology, ethics and standards of practice, professional trends, organization and operation of schools. Prerequisites: Matriculation in School Psychology Track and consent of program director.
  • PSYC 717 THEORIES OF FAMILY COUNSELING (3)
  • Theoretical approaches and strategic methods of evaluating and counseling disturbed families.
  • PSYC 718 TECHNIQUES OF FAMILY COUNSELING (3)
  • Identification of problems that cause families to deteriorate, diagnosis of those problems, and techniques that will help families work through their difficulties. Emphasis on development of skills essential to effective family counseling practice. Prerequisites: Must have passed the departmental advancement candidacy examination or be enrolled in the CAS Program, and consent of the course instructor.
  • PSYC 720 ASSESSMENT OF INTELLIGENCE (3)
  • Construction, standardization, administration, scoring and interpretation of tests. Prerequisites: Matriculation in Clinical or School Psychology and consent of program director. Lab/Class fee will be assessed.
  • PSYC 721 GROUP COUNSELING (3)
  • Theories, principles and techniques of group counseling. Prerequisites: Must have passed the departmental advancement to candidacy examination and have consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 722 ADVANCED MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING (3)
  • Self-awareness, theoretical, assessment and treatment issues in the areas of multicultural counseling.
  • PSYC 730 ADVANCED CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOTHERAPY (3)
  • Treatment of specific presenting problems seen in childhood and adolescence. Application of techniques in students’ field. Prerequisite: instructor approval.
  • PSYC 731 SCHOOL BASED CONSULTATION (3)
  • Theoretical and applied aspects of school consultation within framework of curricular, administrative and overall school environment. Prerequisite: Matriculation in School Psychology Track or consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 733 EXCEPTIONAL CHILD: ADVANCED ISSUES (3)
  • Identification of and planning for the students with exceptionalities in the schools. Focus of IDEA diagnostic categories and relevant new techniques. Prerequisite: Matriculation in School Psychology Track or consent of program director.
  • PSYC 735 DIRECT ASSESSMENT OF ACADEMIC SKILLS (3)
  • Direct assessment of academic skill deficits with a focus on developing technical and theoretical expertise in the area of assessment-to-intervention practices for children in academic settings. Corequisite: PSYC 773. Prerequisites: instructor approval, matriculation in the program in School Psychology, and completion of PSYC 720, PSYC 790, and PSYC 771 with a grade of B or higher.
  • PSYC 745 PRACTICUM IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY (1-3)
  • Supervised experience in educational, vocational and personal counseling. Must be taken in two separate semesters (3 credits per semester). Prerequisites: PSYC 609, PSYC 790 and must have passed the departmental advancement to candidacy examination and have consent of counseling program director.
  • PSYC 755 COGNITIVE THERAPY I (3)
  • Theory and techniques of cognitive and rational-emotive therapy, including assessment strategies and basic applications. Prerequisites: PSYC 631, PSYC 655, PSYC 665, matriculation in Clinical Psychology Program and consent of program director.
  • PSYC 761 SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIORAL ASSESSMENT (3)
  • Advanced knowledge of social/emotional and behavioral assessment. Identification and assessment of common internalizing and externalizing disorders through a variety of methods. Prerequisites: Matriculation in School Psychology Track or Clinical Psychology Program and consent of program director.
  • PSYC 765 PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Theoretical and empirical bases underlying personality assessment. Introduction to methods and instruments used in clinical evaluation. Prerequisites: Matriculation in Clinical Psychology Program and consent of program director.
  • PSYC 771 SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICUM I (3)
  • Fieldwork in a public school setting under the supervision of a certified or licensed school psychologist. Concurrent weekly class meetings. Prerequisites: PSYC 605, PSYC 651, PSYC 625, PSYC 611, PSYC 713, PSYC 733, PSYC 687, PSYC 761, PSYC 720, PSYC 790: matriculation in School Psychology Program; and consent of program director.
  • PSYC 773 SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICUM II (3)
  • Fieldwork under the supervision of a certified or licensed psychologist. Students must be available for clinic or school placement. Stress on techniques appropriate for the schools. Prerequisites: PSYC 651, PSYC 731 and PSYC 771; matriculation in School Psychology Program and consent of program director.
  • PSYC 790 ETHICAL, LEGAL AND PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Treatment of ethical, legal and professional issues related to the practice of school, clinical and counseling psychology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 791 INTERNSHIP SEMINAR IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY (1.5)
  • Seminar to accompany school psychology internship during Fall semester of the one-year internship. Focus on adaptive, ethical, and professional competence. Graded S/U. Corequisite: PSYC 794. Prerequisites: C.A.S. candidate in School Psychology track, successful completion of Masters Comprehensive Exam, completion of all coursework in the Graduate Program of School Psychology leading up to the Internship, acquisition of an internship placement, and permission of program director.
  • PSYC 792 INTERNSHIP SEMINAR IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY II (1.5)
  • Seminar to accompany school psychology internship during Spring semester of the one-year internship. Focus on adaptive, ethical, and professional competence. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: C.A.S. candidate in School Psychology track, successful completion of Masters Comprehensive Exam, completion of all coursework in the Graduate Program of School Psychology leading up to the Internship, acquisition of an internship placement, and permission of program director.
  • PSYC 793 INTERNSHIP IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY (3-9)
  • Intensive experience within a counseling facility involving exposure to the many facets of a mental health professional, including administrative and record-keeping duties; individual and group counseling observations and experiences; referral resources, etc. Prerequisites: PSYC 745 and consent of instructor.
  • PSYC 794 INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY I (4.5)
  • Full-time internship placement in a school setting. Offered Fall semester only. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: C.A.S candidate in School Psychology track, successful completion of Masters Comprehensive Exam, completion of all coursework in the Graduate Program of School Psychology leading up to the internship, acquisition of an internship placement, and permission of program director.
  • PSYC 795 INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY II (1)
  • Full-time internship placement in a school setting. Offered Winter session only. Includes on-campus seminar for interns within 50 miles of campus. Prerequisites: CAS candidate in school psychology track and permission of program director.
  • PSYC 796 INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY II (4.5)
  • Full-time internship placement in a school setting. Offered Spring semester only. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: C.A.S. candidate in School Psychology track, successful completion of Masters Comprehensive Exam, completion of all coursework in the Graduate Program of School Psychology leading up to the Internship, acquisition of an internship placement, and permission of program director.
  • PSYC 797 INTERNSHIP IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3)
  • Supervised field experience in a community mental health center, state psychiatric hospital, or other public mental health facility with exposure to the duties of a master’s level clinical psychologist including psychological assessment, psychotherapy, and report writing. Prerequisites: PSYC 697 and consent of Clinical Psychology Program director.
  • PSYC 897 PSYCHOLOGY THESIS (6)
  • Original research in psychology, using acceptable design and methodology, supervised by one or more faculty members.
  • PSYC 898 PSYCHOLOGY THESIS (3)
  • The previous course, PSYC 897, taken over two consecutive semesters.
  • PSYC 899 THESIS CONTINUUM (1)
  • Continuation of thesis research.

Psychology Minor
Complement your coursework in other disciplines by pursuing a minor in psychology, and boost your critical thinking, analytical and decision-making skills.

Psychology student
Psychology student.
Develop the intellectual skills that allow you to generate and evaluate knowledge in many areas by learning how psychologists research human thought, emotion and behavior. Gain experience in the field and earn credit through an internship placement that pairs you with a working professional in the field.

Students in the minor will develop an understanding of the history of psychology, current trends and emerging ideas in the field. The background provided will allow students to explore careers in psychology or other professions that demand as an understanding of behavior.

Minors are required to complete 26 credits in psychology with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher in each course. View degree requirements for the minor in the Undergraduate Catalog.

Research Pool
Students are encouraged to participate in research studies conducted by psychology department faculty and students. Some instructors give credit for participation, so contact your instructor for details.

Expand your knowledge of psychology and get to know your fellow students and faculty when you join the Psychology Club. Learn more about meeting times and upcoming events.

Field Experiences
Practicum
During the second year of the program, concurrent with other course work, students enroll in a full-year practicum course (fall and spring terms). The course includes a two-day per week placement in a local school system under the supervision of a certified school psychologist (arranged by the program faculty) and a weekly seminar on campus. During practicum, students engage in a carefully sequenced series of experiences suited to their level of professional training.

Internship
Following successful completion of the practicum and comprehensive examination, students are eligible to apply for internships. The 1,200-hour internship is considered a capstone experience and occurs after the completion of all course work. Internships are completed on a full-time basis over one year or on a part-time basis over two years. Students in local placements (approximately 75 percent of our students) attend a biweekly seminar on campus taught by the internship coordinator, who is a full-time school psychology faculty member.

Examinations
Comprehensive Examination
The written comprehensive exam must be completed successfully before a student begins the internship. Students have one opportunity to retake the comprehensive exam if it is not passed the first time. For candidates already possessing a master’s degree in School Psychology from another university, the requirement for the Comprehensive Exam will be determined by faculty.

Portfolio Evaluation
All C.A.S. candidates are required to submit a professional portfolio during the last term of their internship. Specific contents and standards for portfolios are provided to students by their advisers.

Praxis II Examination
Praxis II Examination in School Psychology must be taken prior to the conclusion of the internship year.

School of Graduate Psychology
School
School of Graduate Psychology (SGP) offers three terminal degree options: a master’s in applied psychological science, a PhD in clinical psychology, and a PsyD in clinical psychology.

The school also offers internship opportunities, as well as services to the public through the Pacific Psychology & Comprehensive Health Clinic in two locations. All career paths and services in SGP reflect core values of compassion, integrity, diversity, and discovery. All programs lead to meaningful careers that allow students to apply their skills and knowledge acquired in the program in work that can range from clinical service to administration to teaching to research and more. Our graduates report that they are able to establish successful and fulfilling careers that allow them to continue to grow, contribute, and make a difference.

Mission
Striving for excellence, the faculty at Pacific University’s School of Graduate Psychology prepare psychological professionals who foster collaborative relationships, have inquiring minds, create meaningful change, and dedicate themselves to models of health and well-being that support diversity and social justice.

Core Values
Compassion
Integrity
Diversity
Discovery
Professional Readiness
Practice and Scholarship
SGP provides a comprehensive and integrated educational experience that offers an extensive psychological knowledge base and fosters the development of applied clinical and research competence. SGP curricula are designed to build and integrate the many components and aspects of psychological practice. SGP emphasizes community involvement and flexible, diversity-appropriate, practical applications of scientific psychology. Depending upon the program or area of emphasis, students learn how to apply and contribute to knowledge of human behavior to resolve problems and improve conditions. The programs offer broad and general doctoral education and training that includes preparation in health service psychology. Our PsyD program places relatively greater emphasis on training for engaging in professional practice and our PhD program places relatively greater emphasis on training related to research. The PsyD program presents students with a broad range of theoretical perspectives and exposes them to assessment, intervention, research/evaluation, consultation/education, and management/supervision. Students in the PhD program are trained to integrate the science and practice of psychology by completing specific coursework, producing original empirical research, and engaging in clinical practicum placements. Graduates of each program, however, must demonstrate a fundamental understanding of and competency in both research/scholarly activities and evidence-based professional practice. The goal of the Master’s Program in Applied Psychological Science is to foster learning of and competence in skills necessary for responsible and ethical professional practice in a variety of contexts and settings.

Clinical Strength
The School of Graduate Psychology maintains two in-house psychology training clinics, which provide supervised clinical experiences for doctoral practicum students while offering a wide range of psychological services to the community. The school also has partnerships with more than 70 practicum sites, including Juvenile and County Correction Centers, Oregon State Hospital, Oregon Health & Science University and local counseling centers.

Practicum and Internship Flexibility
Doctoral and clinical Master’s students complete an internship during their last year of the program. Doctoral students complete practica throughout their second and third years in the program, with the option of a fourth-year field placement. Training helps integrate scientific knowledge with clinical application, and you will gain supervision experience with a range of client populations in a variety of clinical settings. In addition, there are dozens of practicum and internship sites where you can further develop your interests.

The school offers its own American Psychological Association-accredited internship program for doctoral internship training. We successfully place interns at approved sites across the country that match their interests, including hospitals, academic counseling centers, Veterans Administration facilities, community mental health centers and military internships that prepare you for entering with the rank of captain after graduation. During your internship, you will learn under clinical supervision and be prepared to practice, teach or conduct research upon graduation.

School Location
The School of Graduate Psychology is located on Pacific University’s Hillsboro Campus, a suburb of Portland, Oregon. Founded as the home of Pacific University’s College of Health Professions, students enjoy a close connection with students in other health programs.

The Pacific University Hillsboro Campus is ideally situated in the heart of downtown Hillsboro’s Health and Education District, creating strong partnerships with businesses and local leaders in healthcare and education. Its location right along the MAX light-rail line also makes the campus an easy commute for graduate and professional students throughout the Portland area.

Land Acknowledgement

The School of Graduate Psychology and Pacific University honor the people and acknowledge the indigenous land of the Atfalati, Clatskanie, and Kalapuya nations that our campuses occupy.

Interprofessional Learning
The School of Graduate Psychology, in Hillsboro, Oregon is proud to be one of eight schools within Pacific University’s College of Health Professions (CHP). This dynamic college provides a consortium of graduate and professional health students, creating a unique interdisciplinary environment.

Students at Pacific are engaged in interdisciplinary study in the first semester while enrolled in Foundations of Interprofessional Practice, a course designed to bring students from all CHP programs together to gain interprofessional knowledge and awareness in a team-based setting. Course topics include team building, diversity and leadership.

The College of Health Professions hosts six annual Interprofessional Case Conferences in which faculty and community health professionals present case studies on current healthcare issues. By integrating these conferences throughout the year, we give students a forum for interaction and dialogue on topics that directly affect their areas of study while learning about the perspectives of other future healthcare providers. Students also have the opportunity to engage in the practices of other university programs by using on-campus clinic services for their individual healthcare needs.

Interested in learning medical Spanish? The College of Health Professions also offers an optional medical Spanish course for all health students — yet another opportunity to develop your skills while gaining interprofessional knowledge. In addition to on-campus involvement, you can apply your Spanish across borders. Students completing the Latino Psychology Emphasis or with fluency in Spanish can travel to various parts of the Pacific Northwest for a summer experiential course to further develop their skills.


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