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UCLA Nursing Graduate Programs

Last Updated on September 1, 2021 by

Is there anything else you need to learn about UCLA Nursing Graduate Programs? If so, you need not be concerned because the following article will provide the information to answer your questions.

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In addition to the University’s minimum requirements and those listed above, all applicants are expected to submit a statement of purpose. When writing the statement of purpose, applicants should refer to the Evaluation Criteria Form on the School of Nursing website

Since written and oral communication skills are basic to the practice of nursing, it is essential that applicants read, write, and speak English well. International applicants from a country in which English is not the first language and medium of instruction, whether a licensed registered nurse in the U.S. or not, are required to submit TOEFL or IELTS scores prior to consideration for admission.

Registered nurses who are not licensed in the United States must, prior to consideration for admission, submit verification of a passing score on both the nursing and the English sections of the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) examination.

The following are also required:

M.S.N. Advanced Practice Registered Nursing: (1) Graduation from a recognized college or university having an accredited baccalaureate nursing program satisfactory to the School of Nursing and to the Graduate Division, or graduation with a baccalaureate degree in nursing from an international institution with a nursing program satisfactory to the School of Nursing and to the Graduate Division. If admitted under the latter, applicants may be required to enroll in certain undergraduate nursing courses which generally may not be applied toward requirements for advanced degrees.

Professional Development - UCLA Department of Nursing - Los Angeles, CA

(2) Status as a licensed registered nurse. At the time of the application is submitted, evidence of current licensure as a registered nurse in the State of California is mandatory.

(3) An upper division statistics course or a lower division statistics course with content equivalent to Biostatistics 100A must be completed before entering the school.

(4) An upper division nursing research course, taken at an accredited institution and equivalent to Nursing 173, must be completed before entering the school.

(5) An upper division physical assessment course, taken at an accredited institution and equivalent to Nursing 174, must be completed before entering the school(not required of applicants selecting the Nursing Administration specialty).

(6) An upper division or equivalent undergraduate physiology course equivalent to Nursing 105. This course must have been completed within the last five years (not required of students selecting the nursing administration specialty). Pathophysiology is not acceptable.

M.S.N. Master’s Entry Clinical Nursing: (1) Graduation from a recognized college or university having an accredited baccalaureate program satisfactory to the School of Nursing and to the Graduate Division, or graduation with a baccalaureate degree from an international institution with a program satisfactory to the School of Nursing and to the Graduate Division. Applicants admitted from international institutions may be required to enroll in certain undergraduate courses, which generally may not be applied toward requirements for advanced degrees.

(2) Completion of acceptable prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better in group and verbal communications, English composition (two college level writing intensive courses in the English language), human anatomy, human physiology, introductory microbiology, principles of epidemiology (if admitted, may be completed at UCLA), introductory psychology, introduction to biostatistics, and introductory inorganic, organic and biochemistry.

Management, M.B.A./Nursing, M.S.N.

The School of Nursing and the Anderson Graduate School of Management offer a concurrent degree program designed for students interested in employment in all sectors of the health care delivery system, including hospitals, corporate health care headquarters, home health care agencies, and long-term care facilities, as well as policy-making bodies and consulting firms. Applicants must apply to both the M.B.A. program and the School of Nursing.

Ph.D.: Students may enter with a bachelor’s in Nursing or Entry-Level Master’s (ELM) in Nursing or Advanced Practice (APN) in Nursing. Those admitted to doctoral study with a bachelor’s degree in nursing or ELM degree are required to make up clinical specialty deficiencies by taking courses in one of the current master’s advanced practice programs. Such courses may be taken concurrently with doctoral courses. Individuals admitted with a bachelor’s degree in nursing are required to complete selected master’s courses in nursing at UCLA as a prerequisite to entry into doctoral courses. Thus, extra coursework and additional on-campus attendance may be required of students admitted with a B.S. or ELM degree.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program must provide evidence of the following:

(1) A master’s degree in nursing; or a B.S. degree in Nursing. Degrees must be from an accredited program satisfactory to the School of Nursing and the Graduate Division. Students who are accepted with deficiencies are required to complete appropriate master’s courses.

(2) A minimum grade-point average of 3.5.

(3)A Biostistics course with content equivalent to Biostatistis 100A or Biomathematisc 170A (equivalent of four quarter units).

(4) A graduate-level nursing research course with content equivalent to Nursing 204.

(5) Examples of scholarly papers and/or creative works.

(6) A statement of educational objectives, specific focus of research, and program and career goals.

Status as a licensed registered nurse: Evidence of current licensure as a registered nurse in the U.S. or in your home country.

Nursing

School of Nursing

Graduate Degrees

The School of Nursing offers the Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) degree and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Nursing.

Master’s Degree

There are two tracks to the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree. The first track is the M.S.N.-Master’s Entry Clinical Nursing (MECN) program designed for students who have baccalaureate degrees in subjects other than Nursing. The program prepares individuals to sit for the licensing exam to become Registered Nurses (RN). The second track is the M.S.N.-Advanced Practice Registered Nursing (APRN) program intended for those with baccalaureate degrees in Nursing who wish to assume advanced practice nursing roles as Nurse Practitioners and/or Clinical Nurse Specialists.

Advising

Graduate Nursing students are assigned to a faculty adviser at the time they enter the program who will guide their course of study. MSN-APRN students are assigned to academic faculty advisers in the first year and clinical faculty advisers in the second year. All graduate students are expected to meet with their faculty advisers at least once each quarter. The faculty adviser will place documentation of each advising appointment in the student’s file. If a student has a question about a particular course, the student is advised to speak with the course instructor first. Otherwise, the faculty adviser should be the first point of contact for any student with questions or concerns about the program.

Additionally for MSN-MECN students, the School of Nursing has designated Nursing Specialty Coaches for students seeking additional help in major nursing coursework. A student who is not making satisfactory progress in a nursing course will be referred to a Nursing Specialty Coach (NSC) by a faculty member. Students may also make a self-referral. In addition to the NSC’s, there is a designated Clinical Coach in the skills lab. Clinical faculty may refer students to the Clinical Coach, or students may make a self-referral.

Areas of Study

M.S.N. Master’s Entry Clinical Nursing: The School of Nursing offers graduate studies for Master’s Entry Clinical Nursing to prepare individuals with a baccalaureate in another field who wish to become registered nurses. Students are prepared with strong leadership skills to function in health care delivery across a variety of settings in the health care system, including the acute care setting. Graduates of this program are eligible for certification as a Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL), work at the bedside, and are prepared to implement the outcomes-based practice and quality improvement in clinical settings. The program includes eligibility for Public Health Nurse Certification after passing the NCLEX.

M.S.N. Advanced Practice Nursing: Currently, the School of Nursing offers graduate studies and preparation in the Advanced Practice Nurse Practitioner role or the Clinical Nurse Specialist role. Practice is divided into four distinct population foci: Adult/Gerontology Primary Care, Adult/Gerontology Acute Care, Family, and Pediatrics. Adult/Gerontology Primary Care students and Family Nurse Practitioner students may select an additional area of concentration in Occupational and Environmental Health. Adult/Gerontology Acute Care and Pediatrics students may select either the nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist or the dual nurse practitioner/clinical nurse specialist roles. Students in the Pediatrics specialty may select primary care, acute care or dual primary and acute care. Students in the Family, Adult/ Gerontology Primary and Occupational and Environmental Health specialization are prepared in the nurse practitioner role only.

Applicants are advised to seek counseling prior to admission in order to select the population, specialty and role most appropriate to career goals, as well as to meet requirements for acceptance into the particular area of study. Certain programs of study (i.e. dual NP/CNS, MECN) will require summer coursework for degree completion. Continuation in the dual role program is based on academic performance and subject to faculty approval.

All graduates are prepared to sit for advanced practice certification in the appropriate specialty area by agencies providing national certification.

Foreign Language Requirement
None.

Course Requirements

A student is considered in good academic standing when enrolled in at least 8 units each quarter and carrying an overall cumulative GPA of at least 3.0. A student is considered to have passed a theory class when a grade of C or better is earned. A grade of B is required in a clinical course.

Students in the nursing program acquire knowledge and skills that build upon one another from quarter to quarter. Therefore, nursing courses follow a defined sequence and are usually offered once annually. It is essential that students pass all coursework in order to make satisfactory progress in the program. In the instance when a student does not earn a passing grade (defined as a C or better in a theory course, a B in a clinical course), that student may be delayed in their degree completion because many courses are pre-requisite to subsequent courses in the degree program (please consult with the graduate program for further information). Such a student will meet with the academic faculty adviser and then the Director of Student Services in order to create an alternative plan for completing the degree. An alternative plan may include coursework that may be taken subsequent to retaking the failed course, referrals to Nursing Specialty Coaches (if a MECN student), referrals to resources on campus, and other assignments that will increase the student’s chances of success.

MSN – Masters Entry Clinical Nurse (MECN) | Nursing

M.S.N. Master’s Entry Clinical Nursing (MECN): The following 25 courses are required:

In order for a MECN student to qualify for the degree and be certified to the Board of Registered Nursing as being eligible to sit the national board exam to become a Registered Nurse, the following must be successfully completed:

  • All didactic and clinical coursework prescribed in the curriculum
  • All Kaplan Examinations
  • All Objective Structured Clinical Exams (OSCE’s)
  • The Master’s Comprehensive Examination

The following 106 units (25 courses) are required:

  • Research Courses. Nursing 204
  • Nursing Core. Nursing 150A, 150B, 174, 225A, 225B, 230A, 230B, 250, 252A, 252B, 260
  • Integrated Clinical Theory and Practice Courses. Nursing 171, 461, 462, 463, 464, 465A, 465B, 465C, 467
  • Administrative/Leadership Courses. Nursing 267, 268, 269
  • Comprehensive Examination Preparation. 597

Since courses are typically offered once each year, a student out of sequence could be delayed up to a year in completing degree requirements.

Objective Structured Clinical Exams (OSCEs) test important nursing skills and are evaluated according to a standard rubric that is available to students for practice in the laboratory during Open Lab hours ahead of the OSCE testing. They are usually given at the end of each clinical course during finals week as a summative evaluation.

M.S.N. Advanced Practice Registered Nursing (APRN): Specific requirements for each area of clinical specialization are described below. A total of four units of 500-series courses may be applied toward the total course requirement for the degree. Students must earn a B or better in clinical courses.

Course requirements for the APRN vary according to role, focus, and specialty area selected. Students should see courses under each population focus and/or specialty listed below. Since courses are typically offered once each year, a student out of sequence could be delayed up to a year in completing degree requirements.

Requirements for Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Population

76-77 units (18 courses) are required to complete the Advanced Practice Nursing (APRN) Program with a specialty in Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Population. The focus for the Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner is to provide primary care to individuals across the adult age spectrum from late adolescence through older adulthood. In addition, these students are prepared to provide comprehensive end of life care to adults. Because the health care needs of adults range from wellness to complex illness care, the settings in which the Adult/Gerontology Primary Care NP delivers care are diverse. In many cases, Adult/Gerontology Primary NPs follow their patients across care settings to maintain quality and safety during care transitions.

Interdisciplinary collaboration and care management are emphasized. Required theory courses are Nursing 200, 204, 211, 224, 231, 232, 239A, 239B, 239C, 264, N597, and 3-4 units of theory elective. Required laboratory/clinical courses are N440, N439A, N439B, N439C, N439D, and N439E.

Applicants selecting the Adult/Gerontology Primary Care or Family Nurse Practitioner focus may also select an additional area of concentration: Occupational and Environmental Health. Students must meet all requirements of the Adult/Gerontology Primary Care Population or the Family Nurse Practitioner Population. Additional coursework integrates principles of occupational and environmental health assessment and care with primary ambulatory care of adults. Practitioners evaluate the individual as seen within the work setting as well as within the family and community group. Primary focus and emphasis are on health status assessment, health promotion, illness/accident prevention, hazard control, screening, surveillance, and rehabilitation of adult workers. Requirements are met through a combination of courses and experiences specific to the delivery of occupational and environmental health care services. In addition to the course requirements for the Adult/Gerontology Primary Care and Family Nurse Practitioner specialties, students seeking the subspecialty in Occupational and Environmental Health also complete the following courses: N213, and 10 units of approved Environmental Health Sciences and/or Epidemiology electives. Students pursuing the Occupational Health subspecialty do not have to take the nursing theory elective.

Requirements for Adult/Gerontology Acute Care Population

The Adult/Gerontology Acute Care population focus covers individuals from adolescence through adulthood and older age who are identified as ill and who have high intensity nursing and medical needs. Students may select the nurse practitioner role, the clinical nurse specialist role, or the dual role (NP and CNS). These patients may receive care in a wide variety of settings, from intensive care units to specialty clinics, doctor’s offices, or the home. A minimum of two years of prior experience in acute care is highly recommended. Graduates are expected to engage in research-based practice as acute care nurse practitioners and/or clinical specialists, educators, consultants, and to become leaders in both inpatient and outpatient settings.

For those students pursuing the Nurse Practitioner role, 69-70 units (19 courses) are required. The required theory courses are Nursing 200, 204, 216A, 216B, 216C, 224, 229A, 229B, 229C, 231, N597, and three to four units of theory elective. The required laboratory/clinical courses are N440, N444, N416A, N416B, N416C, N416D, and N416E.

The CNS/NP Dual program requires 92 units (22 unique courses). Students who prepare for dual certification (NP/CNS) take the required courses listed above, except for the four units of theory elective; they also take Nursing 220, 245, 269, and 445. N445 is taken in Summer A and Summer C for a total of 17 units. 416E is taken in the last quarter for 6 units rather than 8 (required of the NP’s).

Students who select the Clinical Nurse Specialist role take Nursing 200, 204, 216A, 216B, 216C, 220, 224, 229A, 229B, 229C, 231, 245, 269, N597, and a 3- or 4-unit nursing theory elective. The laboratory/clinical courses are 440 , 444 and 445. N445 is taken multiple times for a total of 28 units. The CNS role is 80-81 units (18 unique courses).

Requirements for Family Population

78-79 units (19 courses) are required to complete the Advanced Practice Nursing (APRN) Program with a specialty in Family Population. The family population (FNP) covers primary health care for individuals throughout the life span. The focus is on collaborative, interdisciplinary practice to assure comprehensive quality health care and health maintenance in outpatient, work site, home health, nursing home, and other ambulatory settings. Emphasis is on the assessment, treatment, and evaluation of the client’s responses to actual or potential health problems, which may be chronic or acute and include primary prevention and health promotion. The required theory courses are Nursing 200, 204, 211, 212, 224, 231, 236, 239A, 239B, 239C, 264, N597, and three or four units of theory elective. The required laboratory/clinical courses are N440, N429A, N429B, N429C, N429D, and N429E.

In addition to the courses above, FNP students wishing to pick up the Occupational and Environmental Health subspecialty also complete N213 and 10 units of approved Environmental Health Sciences and/or Epidemiology electives. The nursing theory elective is waived.

The pediatric population focus covers the primary health care of children from birth to adolescence. The acute care CNS and acute care NP roles covers children from birth to adolescence who are identified as ill and who have high intensity nursing and medical needs. Emphasis is on the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of children’s actual or potential health problems. Content stresses care for acute and chronic illnesses as well as primary prevention.

There are 68-69 units (17 courses) required for the Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner role. The required theory courses are Nursing 200, 204, 212, 223, 224, 231, 237A, 238A, 238B, 264, N597, and three or four units of theory elective. The required laboratory/clinical courses are N440, N437A, N438A, N438B, N438C.

There are 77-78 units (20 courses) required for the Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner role. The required theory courses are Nursing 200, 204, 212, 223, 224, 231, 237A, 237B, 238A, 238B, 264, N597, and three or four units of theory elective. The required laboratory/clinical courses are N440, N441, N437A, N437B, N437C, N438A, and N438B.

There are 75-76 units (16 unique courses) required for the Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist role. The required theory courses are 200, 204, 220, 231, 223, 224, 245, 269, 212, 264, 237A, 237B, 597 and a three- or four-unit nursing elective. The required laboratory/clinical courses are 440 and 445. 445 is taken multiple quarters.

There are 88 units (20 courses) required for the Pediatric Dual Primary and Acute Care Nurse Practitioner role. The required courses are 200, 204, 231, 223, 224, 212, 264, 238A, 238B, 237A, 237B, and N597. The required laboratory/clinical courses are 440, 441, 438A, 438B, 437A, 437B, and 437C.

There are 98 units (23 courses) required for the Pediatric Dual Clinical Nurse Specialist and Acute Care Nurse Practitioner role. The required courses are 200, 204, 220, 231, 223, 224, 238A, 238B, 245, 269, 237A, 237B, 212, 264, and 597. The required laboratory/clinical courses are 440, 441, 438A, 438B, 437A, 437B, 437C, and 445.

Teaching Experience

Capstone Plan

MSN students are advanced to candidacy in the last quarter of enrollment in the program and the successful completion of the comprehensive examination.

Successful completion of the comprehensive examination is required for all MSN students. The comprehensive examination is based on the coursework taken in the program and is given in written form during spring quarter. The comprehensive exam is read by three faculty members and is graded either Pass or Fail. In the event that a student fails the exam, a coach will be assigned to give feedback to the student based on the readers’ comments before the student is expected to resubmit the exam. Students are eligible to take the examination once they are advanced to candidacy (usually in the spring of the second year) and may repeat the examination twice within a calendar year. One retake may occur during the spring quarter. Otherwise, retakes are offered during summer sessions and fall quarter. Students must complete all requirements for the degree within one calendar year after advancement to candidacy.

Thesis Plan

None.

Time to Degree

M.S.N. Master’s Entry Clinical Nursing: Normal progress from graduate admission to conferral of degree is six academic quarters and one summer.

M.S.N. Advanced Practice Nursing: Normal progress from graduate admission to conferral of degree is six academic quarters.

DEGREENORMATIVE TIME TO ATC (Quarters)NORMATIVE TTDMAXIMUM TTD
M.S.N. Master’s Entry Clinical Nursing7710
M.S.N. Advanced Practice Nursing6610

Doctoral Degree

Advising

Upon admission, students are assigned doctoral advisers recommended by the Student Affairs Committee, in cooperation with the Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion as well as the PhD Program Director, to provide individual supervision and to guide selection of a suitable program of study. Doctoral advisers are chosen for their expertise in the student’s research area.

Students meet with their doctoral advisers at least once each quarter to determine course work for the following quarter. A student may seek the advice of the Director of Student Services at any time.

MSN – Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) | Nursing

Students’ doctoral advisers may become their dissertation mentor. Students are encouraged to identify their dissertation mentor by the time they complete required course work. The maximum number of quarters for advancement to candidacy for students with a master’s degree is 12 quarters; for students entering with a bachelor’s degree, the maximum is 15 quarters.

Major Fields or Subdisciplines

The goal of the UCLA School of Nursing (SON) Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree program is to develop the foundation of knowledge upon which the practice of the profession is based. The UCLA SON Ph.D. program aims to develop nurse scientists who can conduct research and generate theory that incorporate the influence of the biologic, psychosocial, and physical environments on health and healthcare. Areas of focus and interest include, but are not limited to: health of diverse and vulnerable populations, older adults, and persons with chronic and communicable diseases. Doctoral graduates serve as leaders who educate, influence practice, advance science, optimize healthcare delivery, and influence healthcare policy worldwide.

Foreign Language Requirement

Course Requirements

Students admitted to the Ph.D. program without an advanced practice M.S.N. may find it necessary to complete additional graduate level courses in nursing or an equivalent discipline focused on their research topic. Courses must be chosen in consultation with the student’s faculty adviser. Note that course requirements vary by the student’s research focus; thus, certain programs of study will entail longer time to completion and/or less flexibility in class scheduling than others.

Students admitted to the Ph.D. program with a Bachelors (B.S.) may petition for a Master of Science (M.S.) degree upon completion of the first two years of required course work and passing the written qualifying exam.

The following courses are required of students in the Ph.D. program:

  1. Nursing theory: Nursing 202, 206A, 206B, 210A, 210B
  2. Nursing research: Nursing 205A, 205B, 205C, 207, 208, 295A-295B, 299A-299B. Nursing 205A, 207, 208, 295A, 299A are required for all doctoral students. Students must take either of the following: Nursing 299B for quantitative research, or 205B, 205C and 299B for qualitative research (299B may be repeated). N295B is an elective. However, students must take either of the following:
    1. Nursing 299B twice for students proposing a dissertation using quantitative methods (299B may be repeated).
    2. Nursing 205B, 205C and 299B (once) for students proposing a dissertation using qualitative methods.
  3. Biostatistics: Biostatistics 100A, 100B, 201A, 201B.
  4. Professional development: Nursing 299D, 495.
  5. Cognates: Minimum of 12 units, three courses in related field relevant to area of research, outside of the School of Nursing. Cognates are to be taken for a letter grade. Biologic sciences students also must complete a faculty adviser-approved Chemistry course.
  6. Dissertation Preparation: 596 before advancing to candidacy and 599 after advancing to candidacy. Both courses may be taken multiple times.

Teaching Experience

Written and Oral Qualifying Examinations

Academic Senate regulations require all doctoral students to complete and pass university written and oral qualifying examinations prior to doctoral advancement to candidacy. Also, under Senate regulations, the University Oral Qualifying Examination is open only to the student and appointed members of the doctoral committee. In addition to university requirements, some graduate programs have other pre-candidacy examination requirements. What follows in this section is how students are required to fulfill all of these requirements for this doctoral program.

Written Qualifying Examination. The written qualifying examination is usually taken after completion of the following courses: Nursing 202, 205A, 206A, 206B, 207, 210A, 210B, , 299A, and Biostatistics 100B. The examination is submitted in July. The written qualifying examination will be graded independently by two readers. The candidate needs to receive a passing score by the two independent readers. If one score is passing and the other is failing, the exam will be scored by a third reader. Only one reexamination is permitted before the student completes their ninth quarter of study.

Oral Qualifying Examination. The University Oral Qualifying Examination, taken after completing the course requirements and successfully passing the written qualifying examination, evaluates students’ dissertation proposals. The initial step is selection of a doctoral committee. Students are responsible for obtaining the consent of four or more faculty members to serve on the committee as certifying members. Qualifications of members must be consistent with students’ area of research and special interests and also with the requirements for doctoral committees as stated in the Standards and Procedures for Graduate Study at UCLA.

Advancement to Candidacy

Students are advanced to candidacy upon successful completion of the written and oral qualifying examinations.

Doctoral Dissertation

Every doctoral degree program requires the completion of an approved dissertation that demonstrates the student’s ability to perform original, independent research and constitutes a distinct contribution to knowledge in the principal field of study.

Final Oral Examination (Defense of the Dissertation)

Required for all students in the program.

Time-to-degree

The normative time to degree (TTD) for students completing the doctoral program is 15 quarters.

DEGREENORMATIVE TIME TO ATC (Quarters)NORMATIVE TTDMAXIMUM TTD
Ph.D.81521

Academic Disqualification and Appeal of Disqualification

University Policy

A student who fails to meet the above requirements may be recommended for academic disqualification from graduate study. A graduate student may be disqualified from continuing in the graduate program for a variety of reasons. The most common is failure to maintain the minimum cumulative grade point average (3.00) required by the Academic Senate to remain in good standing (some programs require a higher grade point average). Other examples include failure of examinations, lack of timely progress toward the degree and poor performance in core courses. Probationary students (those with cumulative grade point averages below 3.00) are subject to immediate dismissal upon the recommendation of their department. University guidelines governing academic disqualification of graduate students, including the appeal procedure, are outlined in Standards and Procedures for Graduate Study at UCLA.

Special Departmental or Program Policy

Landing Your First Nursing Job after Graduation - BoardVitals Blog

Master’s

Students who do not achieve a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA each quarter will be granted one quarter of academic probation in which they will be expected to bring their cumulative GPA up to a 3.0 by the end of the designated quarter. Students on academic probation are required to meet with their faculty advisers and course faculty to develop an individualized improvement plan. Subsequently, if a student’s cumulative GPA remains below a 3.0, the student will be recommended to the Graduate Division for academic disqualification from the program. Before the student is recommended for disqualification, the student will have the opportunity to appeal to the nursing faculty on the Student Affairs Committee.

A student may earn a non-passing grade (a C- or lower, or a B- or lower in the case of clinical courses) in one nursing course throughout the program. The student would be expected to repeat that nursing course when it is next offered (usually the following academic year). Since many nursing courses are prerequisite to other nursing courses, it is likely that a student will be delayed in degree completion as a result of a non-passing grade in one class.

A student will be recommended for academic disqualification from the program, regardless of the overall cumulative GPA, in the following situations: a student fails to earn a passing grade during the second attempt at the same course, or a student earns two non-passing grades in different courses.

Doctoral

In addition to all criteria and reasons listed in the previous four paragraphs regarding minimum scholarship, a PhD student may be specifically recommended for academic disqualification for failure of the written or oral qualifying examination a second time or if three or more Unsatisfactory grades are earned in independent study course work in preparation for the dissertation. If the Oral Qualifying Examination is not passed the first time, the student may repeat the exam once on a date determined in consultation with the student’s committee.

Appendix I: MECN Prerequisite List

CourseQuarter TakenPre-requisites
N150AFall Year 1None
N150BWinter Year 1N150A
N171Spring Year 2N461, N465A, N465B, N465C, N462, N464, N463
N174Fall Year 1None
N204Spring Year 1None
N225AWinter Year 1None
N225BSpring Year 1N225A
N230AFall Year 1None
N230BWinter Year 1N230A
N250Fall Year 1None
N252AWinter Year 1None
N254BWinter Year 1N254A
N260Spring Year 1N252A, N252B
N267Spring Year 2N268, N269
N268SummerN250, 465A, 465B
N269Fall Year 2N268, N465A, N465B, N465C
N461SummerN174, N252A, N252B, N260, N465A, N465B
N462Fall Year 2N174, N260, N465A, N465B
N463Fall Year 2N174, N252A, N252B, N465A
N464Fall Year 2N174, N204, N260, N465A, N465B
N465AWinter Year 1N174, N230A, N254A
N465BSpring Year 1N174, N230B, N254B, N465A
N465CSummerN174, N204, N260, N465A, N465B
N467Winter Year 2N174, N268, N461, N462, N463, N464, N465A, N465B, N465C
N597Spring Year 2For comp exam: N268, N461, N462, N463, N464, N465A, N465B, N465C

Appendix II: APRN Prerequisite List

CourseQuarter TakenPre-requisites
N200Fall Year 1None
N204Fall Year 1None
N211Winter Year 1None
N212Fall Year 2None
N213SummerNone
N216AWinter Year 1N200, N231, co-requisites: N224, N416A
N216BSpring Year 1N200, N231, N216A, co-requisite: N416B
N216CFall Year 2N200, N231, N216A, N216B, co-requisite: N416C
N220Fall Year 1None
N223Winter Year 1None
N224Winter Year 1N231
N229AFall Year 2N416B
N229BWinter Year 2N229A
N229CWinter Year 2N229A
N231Fall Year 1None
N232Winter Year 2None
N236Spring Year 1None
N237AFall Year 2N200, N231
N237BWinter Year 2N237A
N238AWinter Year 1N200
N238BSpring Year 1N238A
N239AWinter Year 1N200, N231
N239BSpring Year 1N239A
N239CFall Year 2N239B
N245Spring Year 1N200
N264Winter Year 2N418A, or N438A, or N429A, or N439A
N267Spring Year 2N245, N269, N445
N269Spring Year 1None
N416AWinter Year 1N200, N440, co-requisite N216A
N416BSpring Year 1N416A, co-requisite N216B
N416CFall Year 2N416B, co-requisite N216C
N416DWinter Year 2N416C
N416ESpring Year 2N416D
N429AWinter Year 1N200, N440, co-requisite N239A
N429BSpring Year 1N429A, co-requisite N239B
N429CFall Year 2N429B, co-requisite N239C
N429DWinter Year 2N429C
N429ESpring Year 2N429D
N437AFall Year 2N200, N440, co-requisite N237A
N437BWinter Year 2N437A, co-requisite N237B
N437CSpring Year 2N437B
N438AWinter Year 1N200, N440, co-requisite N238A
N438BSpring Year 1N438A, co-requisite N238B
N438CWinter Year 2N438B, co-requisite N238C
N439AWinter Year 1N200, N440, co-requisite N239A
N439BSpring Year 1N439A, co-requisite N239B
N439CFall Year 2N439B, co-requisite N239C
N439DWinter Year 2N439C
N439ESpring Year 2N439D
N440Fall Year 1N231
N440 (Peds)Winter Year 1N231
N441Spring Year 1N440
N444Winter Year 1N440
N445VariesN220, N245
N597Spring Year 2

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